publication . Article . 2017

Sequence analysis of how disability influenced life trajectories in a past population from the nineteenth-century Sundsvall region, Sweden

Lotta Vikström; Helena Haage; Erling Häggström Lundevaller;
Open Access English
  • Published: 01 Jan 2017 Journal: Historical Life Course Studies, volume 4 (issn: 2352-6343, Copyright policy)
  • Publisher: Umeå universitet, Enheten för demografi och åldrandeforskning (CEDAR)
  • Country: Sweden
Abstract
Historically, little is known about whether and to what extent disabled people found work and formed families. To fill this gap, this study analyses the life course trajectories of both disabled and non-disabled individuals, between the ages of 15 and 33, from the Sundsvall region in Sweden during the nineteenth century. Having access to micro-data that report disabilities in a population of 8,874 individuals from the parish registers digitised by the Demographic Data Base, Umeå University, we employ sequence analysis on a series of events that are expected to occur in life of young adults: getting a job, marrying and becoming a parent, while also taking into ac...
Persistent Identifiers
Subjects
free text keywords: 19th Century, Sweden, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR), Demographic Data Base, Disability, Life trajectories, Economic theory. Demography, HB1-3840, Sequence analysis, Life course, Life trajectories, Disability, Demographic Data Base, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR), Nineteenth century, Sweden, History, Historia, Historia, Nineteenth century, Sequence analysis, History, Life course, lcsh:Economic theory. Demography, lcsh:HB1-3840
Related Organizations
Communities
Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
46 references, page 1 of 4

Abbott, A. (1990). A primer on sequence methods. Organization Science, 1(4), 375-392.

Abbott, A. (1995). Sequence analysis: new methods for old ideas. Annual Review of Sociology, 21, 93-113.

Aisenbrey, A. & Fasang, A. E. (2010). New life for old ideas: the “second wave” of sequence analysis. Bringing the “course” back Into the life course. Sociological Methods & Research, 38(3), 420-462. [OpenAIRE]

Alter, G. C. (1988). Family and the Female Life Course: The Women of Verviers, Belgium, 1849-1880. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin.

Alter, G. C., Gutmann, M. P., Leonard, S. H. & Merchant, E. R. (2012). Introduction: longitudinal analysis of historical-demographic data. Journal of Interdisciplinary History, 42(4), 503-517.

Barnes, C. & Mercer, G. (2005). Disability, work, and welfare: challenging the social exclusion of disabled people. Work, Employment and Society, 19(3), 527-545.

Bengtsson, S. (2012). Arbete för individen och samhället. In: K. Engwall & S. Larsson (Eds.), Utanförskapets historia - om funktionsnedsättning och funktionshinder. Lund: Studentlitteratur.

Bengtsson, T., Campbell, C. & Lee, J. Z. (Eds.). (2004). Life under Pressure. Mortality and Living Standards in Europe and Asia, 1700-1900. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

Bergman, M. (2010). Constructing communities: The establishment and demographic development of sawmill communities in the Sundsvall district, 1850-1890 (Doctoral dissertation). Umeå, Umeå University.

BiSOS (1907). A. Befolknings-statistik. Statistiska Central-Byråns underdåniga berättelse för år 1900. Tredje afdelningen. Stockholm: SCB.

Borsay, A. (2005). Disability and Social Policy in Britain since 1750. Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan.

Bras, H., Liefbroer, A. C. & Elzinga, C. H. (2010). Standardization of pathways to adulthood? An analysis of Dutch cohorts born between 1850 and 1900. Demography, 47(4), 1013-1034. [OpenAIRE]

Engberg, E. (2005). I fattiga omständigheter: Fattigvårdens former och understödstagare i Skellefteå socken under 1800-talet (Doctoral dissertation). Umeå, Umeå University. [OpenAIRE]

Foucault, M. (1965). Madness and Civilization: A History of Insanity in the Age of Reason. New York: Pantheon books.

Förhammar, S. (1991). Från tärande till närande: Handikapputbildningens bakgrund och socialpolitiska funktion i 1800-talets Sverige. Stockholm: Almqvist & Wiksell.

46 references, page 1 of 4
Abstract
Historically, little is known about whether and to what extent disabled people found work and formed families. To fill this gap, this study analyses the life course trajectories of both disabled and non-disabled individuals, between the ages of 15 and 33, from the Sundsvall region in Sweden during the nineteenth century. Having access to micro-data that report disabilities in a population of 8,874 individuals from the parish registers digitised by the Demographic Data Base, Umeå University, we employ sequence analysis on a series of events that are expected to occur in life of young adults: getting a job, marrying and becoming a parent, while also taking into ac...
Persistent Identifiers
Subjects
free text keywords: 19th Century, Sweden, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR), Demographic Data Base, Disability, Life trajectories, Economic theory. Demography, HB1-3840, Sequence analysis, Life course, Life trajectories, Disability, Demographic Data Base, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR), Nineteenth century, Sweden, History, Historia, Historia, Nineteenth century, Sequence analysis, History, Life course, lcsh:Economic theory. Demography, lcsh:HB1-3840
Related Organizations
Communities
Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
46 references, page 1 of 4

Abbott, A. (1990). A primer on sequence methods. Organization Science, 1(4), 375-392.

Abbott, A. (1995). Sequence analysis: new methods for old ideas. Annual Review of Sociology, 21, 93-113.

Aisenbrey, A. & Fasang, A. E. (2010). New life for old ideas: the “second wave” of sequence analysis. Bringing the “course” back Into the life course. Sociological Methods & Research, 38(3), 420-462. [OpenAIRE]

Alter, G. C. (1988). Family and the Female Life Course: The Women of Verviers, Belgium, 1849-1880. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin.

Alter, G. C., Gutmann, M. P., Leonard, S. H. & Merchant, E. R. (2012). Introduction: longitudinal analysis of historical-demographic data. Journal of Interdisciplinary History, 42(4), 503-517.

Barnes, C. & Mercer, G. (2005). Disability, work, and welfare: challenging the social exclusion of disabled people. Work, Employment and Society, 19(3), 527-545.

Bengtsson, S. (2012). Arbete för individen och samhället. In: K. Engwall & S. Larsson (Eds.), Utanförskapets historia - om funktionsnedsättning och funktionshinder. Lund: Studentlitteratur.

Bengtsson, T., Campbell, C. & Lee, J. Z. (Eds.). (2004). Life under Pressure. Mortality and Living Standards in Europe and Asia, 1700-1900. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

Bergman, M. (2010). Constructing communities: The establishment and demographic development of sawmill communities in the Sundsvall district, 1850-1890 (Doctoral dissertation). Umeå, Umeå University.

BiSOS (1907). A. Befolknings-statistik. Statistiska Central-Byråns underdåniga berättelse för år 1900. Tredje afdelningen. Stockholm: SCB.

Borsay, A. (2005). Disability and Social Policy in Britain since 1750. Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan.

Bras, H., Liefbroer, A. C. & Elzinga, C. H. (2010). Standardization of pathways to adulthood? An analysis of Dutch cohorts born between 1850 and 1900. Demography, 47(4), 1013-1034. [OpenAIRE]

Engberg, E. (2005). I fattiga omständigheter: Fattigvårdens former och understödstagare i Skellefteå socken under 1800-talet (Doctoral dissertation). Umeå, Umeå University. [OpenAIRE]

Foucault, M. (1965). Madness and Civilization: A History of Insanity in the Age of Reason. New York: Pantheon books.

Förhammar, S. (1991). Från tärande till närande: Handikapputbildningens bakgrund och socialpolitiska funktion i 1800-talets Sverige. Stockholm: Almqvist & Wiksell.

46 references, page 1 of 4
Any information missing or wrong?Report an Issue