publication . Article . 2019

‘The Golden Chain of Pious Rabbis’: the origin and development of Finnish Jewish Orthodoxy

Simo Muir; Riikka Tuori;
Open Access Danish
  • Published: 26 May 2019 Journal: Nordisk Judaistik, volume 30, issue 1 (issn: 0348-1646, eissn: 2343-4929, Copyright policy)
  • Publisher: Donner Institute
Abstract
<jats:p>This article provides the first historiographical analysis of the origins of Jewish Orthodoxy in Helsinki and describes the development of the rabbinate from the establishment of the congregation in the late 1850s up to the early 1980s. The origins of the Finnish Jewish community lies in the nineteenth-century Russian army. The majority of Jewish soldiers in Helsinki originated from the realm of Lithuanian Jewish (Litvak) culture, that is, mainly non-Hasidic Jewish Orthodoxy that emerged in the late eighteenth century. Initially, the Finnish Jewish religious establishment continued this Orthodox-Litvak tradition. After the independence of Finland, the He...
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free text keywords: Rabbis, Finland, Jewish Orthodoxy, 615 History and Archaeology, Articles, lcsh:Judaism, lcsh:BM1-990, Orthodoxy, media_common.quotation_subject, media_common, Religious studies, Judaism, History
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38 Bart Wallet, personal communication.

39 See 'Eliezer Berlinger is dead', in Jewish Telegraphic Agency, 6.11.1985.

40 At this point, Finland had signed the Moscow Armistice, and the Continuation War had ended.

37 He was a member of the Sejm between 1922-8 (Hadas 2007: 727-8).

56 Bart Wallet, personal communication.

57 Kishinev (Chișinău, the present capital of Moldova) had a Hasidic yeshivah in operation since 1860 (Moskovich 2010).

Abstract
<jats:p>This article provides the first historiographical analysis of the origins of Jewish Orthodoxy in Helsinki and describes the development of the rabbinate from the establishment of the congregation in the late 1850s up to the early 1980s. The origins of the Finnish Jewish community lies in the nineteenth-century Russian army. The majority of Jewish soldiers in Helsinki originated from the realm of Lithuanian Jewish (Litvak) culture, that is, mainly non-Hasidic Jewish Orthodoxy that emerged in the late eighteenth century. Initially, the Finnish Jewish religious establishment continued this Orthodox-Litvak tradition. After the independence of Finland, the He...
Persistent Identifiers
Subjects
free text keywords: Rabbis, Finland, Jewish Orthodoxy, 615 History and Archaeology, Articles, lcsh:Judaism, lcsh:BM1-990, Orthodoxy, media_common.quotation_subject, media_common, Religious studies, Judaism, History
Related Organizations
Communities
Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage

38 Bart Wallet, personal communication.

39 See 'Eliezer Berlinger is dead', in Jewish Telegraphic Agency, 6.11.1985.

40 At this point, Finland had signed the Moscow Armistice, and the Continuation War had ended.

37 He was a member of the Sejm between 1922-8 (Hadas 2007: 727-8).

56 Bart Wallet, personal communication.

57 Kishinev (Chișinău, the present capital of Moldova) had a Hasidic yeshivah in operation since 1860 (Moskovich 2010).

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