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Publication . Article . 2021

Cultural and creative sectors at a crossroad: from a mainstream process towards an active engagement

Christian Ost; Ruba Saleh;
Open Access
English
Published: 01 Sep 2021 Journal: Built Heritage, volume 5, issue 1, pages 1-16 (issn: 2096-3041, eissn: 2662-6802, Copyright policy )
Publisher: SpringerOpen
Abstract

AbstractThe COVID-19 pandemic has led to a current global health crisis with dreadful repercussions all over the world. A global economic recession is anticipated, with strong impacts in all economic and social sectors, including the cultural sector. Although all sub sectors will be impacted (heritage sites, theatres, museums, operas, art galleries), the cultural built heritage is particularly at stake, as it relies on multiple stakeholders through a wide range of heritage-related activities (tourism, recreation, housing, real estate, construction, craftsmanship, etc.). Sites management and heritage conservation have not only been vulnerable to strong economic and social disruptions, like most of other cultural fields, but have been greatly challenged because heritage values and the paradigm of conservation (50 years after adoption of the UNESCO convention) are being themselves revisited in the perspective of the Sustainable Development Goals. The paper aims also to consider cultural heritage as part of the Cultural and Creative Sectors (CCS) and how creativity and innovation contribute to post-COVID recoveries through Schumpeter-related creative destruction process. The current crisis might be perceived in a perspective of long wave theory of innovations and economic growth. The economic history is filled with many examples of such transition period when inventions, innovations, and growth reactivate the economic development in an upward long-term trend. In such framework, crisis can trigger innovation and creativity and can be understood as opportunity to increase the CCS resilience and sustainability, as well as harness the universality and the power of creativity. Finally, the paper aims to describe implications of such situation by providing to the CCS ways to learn and experience cultural entrepreneurship, resilient strategies, new sustainable and circular business models applied to the cultural heritage sector and its conservation.

Subjects by Vocabulary

Microsoft Academic Graph classification: Cultural heritage Political economy Tourism Sustainable development Political science Business model Recession media_common.quotation_subject media_common Entrepreneurship Sustainability Creative destruction

Subjects

Cultural and creative sectors (CCS), Cultural heritage, Cultural entrepreneurship, Long wave theory, Sustainable and circular business model, COVID-19, Architecture, NA1-9428, Ccultural and Creative Sectors, Cultural heritage, Cultural entrepreneurship, Long wave theory, Sustainable and circular business model, COVID-19, Cultural resilience, Research Article, Cultural resilience, History, Conservation

Funded by
EC| CLIC
Project
CLIC
CLIC - Circular models Leveraging Investments in Cultural heritage adaptive reuse
  • Funder: European Commission (EC)
  • Project Code: 776758
  • Funding stream: H2020 | RIA
Validated by funder
,
EC| CLIC
Project
CLIC
CLIC - Circular models Leveraging Investments in Cultural heritage adaptive reuse
  • Funder: European Commission (EC)
  • Project Code: 776758
  • Funding stream: H2020 | RIA
Validated by funder
Related to Research communities
Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
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Built Heritage
Article . 2021
Providers: PubMed Central
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