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University college Dublin

University college Dublin

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130 Projects, page 1 of 26
  • Funder: WT Project Code: 097429
    Funder Contribution: 153,367 GBP

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  • Funder: WT Project Code: 099830
    Funder Contribution: 153,645 GBP

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  • Funder: WT Project Code: 202386
    Funder Contribution: 2,028 GBP

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a disease characterized by the production of viscous mucus in the respiratory tract which results in airway obstruction and bacterial infection. When P. aeruginosa infects it becomes the predominant pathogen. Infection is usually chronic and isolates produce alginate and become mucoid. The organism is likely to live in a biofilm and be resistant to antimicrobials. The prevention of chronic P. aeruginosa infection is a cornerstone of clinical care in CF. The airway surface liquid (ASL) in the lungs of individuals with CF is more acidic than in the lungs of non CF individuals. In our laboratory we have observed that culture of some clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa at acidic pH can result in the bacteria producing a mucoid phenotype (supporting information, Figure 1). We aim to test the hypothesis that acidic pH in the lung promotes infection. Specifically an aim is to test the effect of pH on production of extracellular polysaccharides and biofim formation as both of these contribute to the problems associated with treating infections in CF. This work could provide preliminary rationale for the development of therapies aimed at increasing the pH in the lungs. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease that alters the secretions in our bodies. In CF the mucus in the lungs is very thick and becomes stagnant. Bacteria are able to infect this stagnant mucus and so CF sufferers get lots of respiratory infections. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a bacteria that causes particular problems for people with CF. The bacteria likes to live in the mucus and it forms biofilms which are clumps of bacteria encased in polysaccharide material. It is difficult to treat these infections as antibiotics cannot penetrate the material around the bacteria. The environment in the CF lung is also more acidic than the pH in the lungs of people without CF. Bacteria can alter their behavior in response to pH and the aim of this study is to test if P. aeruginosa produces more polysaccharide material and is more resistant to antibiotics at acidic pH than at neutral pH. If acidic pH makes P. aeruginosa more dangerous than therapies could be developed to increase the pH of the lung to make the bacteria less likely to cause disease and easier to treat with antibiotics.

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  • Funder: WT Project Code: 102384
    Funder Contribution: 155,242 GBP
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  • Funder: WT Project Code: 225548

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) are a group of disorders of blood cells. As a result of an acquired genetic mutation there are increased numbers of mature blood cells circulating around the body. Blood clots in the arterial and venous systems, including in the heart, brain, lungs and abdomen, occur in up to 30% of patients with MPN and represent the greatest risk to their life expectancy and quality of life. Hyperactive platelets and white cells, inflammatory cells and enhanced coagulation cascade activity all contribute to the mechanism of clotting. Platelets contain granules, the contents of which are released into the circulation upon platelet activation. Platelets are essential for blood coagulation however it is also known that via the protein signals carried in their granules they play an important role in several inflammatory conditions. We believe that characterising the protein content of platelets as well as interrogating individual aspects of the coagulation cascade in patients with MPN, we will be able to explain in greater detail the mechanisms contributing to the increased blood clotting experienced by patients. We plan to examine platelet protein content at diagnosis and at 6 months following initiation of treatment in patients with MPN versus healthy volunteers.

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