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University of Neuchâtel

Country: Switzerland

University of Neuchâtel

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64 Projects, page 1 of 13
  • Funder: SNSF Project Code: 50182
    Funder Contribution: 90,864
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  • Funder: SNSF Project Code: 178864
    Funder Contribution: 338,820
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  • Funder: EC Project Code: 283871
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  • Funder: EC Project Code: 725269
    Overall Budget: 1,997,680 EURFunder Contribution: 1,997,680 EUR

    While the crisis of the territorial nation-state in the Middle East has once again been brought to a head by the wars in Iraq and Syria, it cannot be simply understood as the logical consequence of an imported political construction. Based on two epistemological notions – borderlands as histoire-problème (history-as-problem) and the co-production of borders between state and society – this research project proposes to rethink the classical historical narrative about the emergence of the post-Ottoman Middle East. Taking its cue from trans-border phenomena and thus paying attention to the circulation of people, goods and ideas as well as to everyday encounters between local actors and state representatives, the project will be guided by four principle objectives to offer: • A socio-historical analysis of state violence in the borderlands of the Middle East; • An examination of the capacity of border populations to create the history of the borderlands, nation-states, and the region as a whole; • A study of the frontier effects based around the notions of subjectivity, space and time, and involving various levels of observation (macro, meso and micro) in order to identify the ruptures and continuities evoked by the delineation of new borderlines; and • A historical lens through which to make sense of current events in Syria and Iraq, and possibly orient conflict-resolution practitioners. Through the exploitation of a wide range of sources (diplomatic, administrative and military records, missionary documents, newspapers) and by looking at the social construction of international frontiers at the borderlands located between Turkey, Iraq and Syria in the interwar era, the research project will provide a much more holistic yet finely-grained understanding of the formation of the territorial state in the region in the aftermath of the First World War as well as a historical perspective on the on-going armed conflicts.

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  • Funder: EC Project Code: 838237
    Overall Budget: 265,606 EURFunder Contribution: 265,606 EUR

    Science is facing a reproducibility crisis, whereby many research results, including landmark studies, cannot be independently reproduced. As a consequence, scientific progress is slowed and entire research fields can be misguided. Finding a meaningful solution to this crisis requires increasing transparency and collaboration among researchers to ‘OPTIMISE’ how we conduct science. I will study the role and importance of open data as a means of achieving this goal. Making research data openly accessible to other scientists and the public has many societal benefits, including validating research results and accelerating discoveries. However, open data is controversial among researchers, mainly because of perceived individual costs. Furthermore, we lack empirical research on the efficacy of open data practices at resolving the reproducibility crisis. By combining approaches in social and natural sciences, this action will address this knowledge gap in an interdisciplinary fashion via two overarching objectives: A) Assess whether open data policies result in high-quality data sharing and reduce poor scientific practices; B) Investigate the barriers and motivations behind decisions to adopt open data practices. I will focus on the field of ecology and evolution (my background) and examine: 1) the efficacy of editorial policies mandating open data, 2) the influence of open data practices on the quality of research results, 3) challenges and solutions to sharing sensitive data, 4) barriers to good open data practices, and 5) individual motivations for sharing data. The data to answer these questions are readily collectable and reciprocal knowledge transfer will directly benefit both the hosts and the candidate. Deliverables will help elucidate the barriers and benefits of open science practices to improve research transparency, reproducibility and discovery. These goals support H2020’s objective to facilitate innovation and growth while maintaining scientific integrity.

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