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University of Reading

Country: United Kingdom

University of Reading

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1,508 Projects, page 1 of 302
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: NE/E522575/1
    Funder Contribution: 73,005 GBP

    The COAPEC (Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Processes and European Climate) programme began in 1999 and will end in 2006. It represents an investment by NERC of some £5.5million with the goal of determining the impact on climate, especially European climate, of the coupling between the Atlantic Ocean and the atmosphere. The programme has been very successful, producing many high quality publications (e.g. special issue in Journal of Climate, 19, 7, 2006). It is now important to ensure pull-through to maximise its wider impacts.A major application of COAPEC research is to seasonal climate forecasting. Seasonal forecasting is a cutting-edge technology which offers the potential to provide information about the likelihood of different weather conditions months in advance. The Met Office has been a pioneer in the development of seasonal forecasting and, in mid-2005, issued one of the first ever forecasts for European winter. This forecast attracted a great deal of interest from a wide range of users both in government (e.g. Cabinet Office, Secretary of State for Transport, Energy Minister) and in the commercial sector (especially the energy industry). This interest was a powerful demonstration of user need.The purpose of this project is to work with the Met Office to translate the outcomes of COAPEC research into specific improvements of the Met Office's seasonal forecasting system. The project, which will be 50% funded by the Met Office, will involve: evaluation of the existing forecasting system; experimentation to assess the representation of critical processes; implementation of specific changes to the system; and evaluation of the benefits gained.

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  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/S017828/1
    Funder Contribution: 100,000 GBP

    This proposal describes the University of Reading's plan for the allocation of the £100k EPSRC Capital Award emphasising support for Early Career Researchers (ECRs). The allocation will be used to put in place an internal fund into which eligible applicants will be able to bid for small items of equipment (£10,000- £50,000) to support their cutting-edge research. This fund will be targeted at ECRs, complementing the University's existing support for minor capital equipment (which is not ECR-focused). Awards will be made to ECRs proposing excellent research rooted in EPSRC remit, enabling them to stretch beyond their current research (in scope or in collaboration). We will ensure that for the capital equipment awards that are made, the University is in a position to provide ongoing logistical and technical support in line with the philosophy of the World Class Labs ecosystem.

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  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: ES/I901302/1
    Funder Contribution: 50,743 GBP

    Doctoral Training Partnerships: a range of postgraduate training is funded by the Research Councils. For information on current funding routes, see the common terminology at https://www.ukri.org/apply-for-funding/how-we-fund-studentships/. Training grants may be to one organisation or to a consortia of research organisations. This portal will show the lead organisation only.

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  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: NE/G015937/1
    Funder Contribution: 304,085 GBP

    The central Sahara has one of the most extreme climates on Earth. During the northern summer months, a large low pressure system caused by intense sunshine develops over a huge, largely uninhabited expanse of northern Mali, southern Algeria and eastern Mauritania. Temperatures in the high 40s are normal and uplift of dry air through more than 6000m of the atmosphere is routine in what is thought to be the deepest such layer on the planet. This large zone is also where the thickest layer of dust anywhere in the Earth's atmosphere is to be found. Although the central Sahara is extremely remote, it turns out to be vitally important to the world's weather and climate. The large low pressure system drives the West African Monsoon and the dry, dusty air layers are closely related to the tropical cyclones which form over the Atlantic Ocean. Likewise, the dusty air has a strong influence on the way the atmosphere is heated, a process which is poorly understood. It is not surprising that the models we use to predict weather and climate and which are a crucial tool for understanding how the atmosphere works, all have problems in dealing with the central Sahara. Insights into how the climate system works, improving the models and therefore the predictions have all been held back in the case of the Sahara by a lack of measurements of the atmosphere and the processes that make dust and extreme weather. This will always be the case until a team goes to the central Sahara and makes these measurements. A key part of this proposal aims to do just that. We want to set up an array of special instruments, at the surface in two carefully chosen places in the central Sahara, which will monitor the winds, temperatures, dust and so on for an entire year. We will add to this collection for a shorter period of even more intense measurements during the core summer month of June. We plan also to fly a instruments attached to an aeroplane overhead the surface array and across the desert so that we can get an idea of the structure of the atmosphere and how it changes through the day. To find out how dust storms work, we will leave 10 weather stations at places where we think dust storms happen frequently. Satellites play an essential role in measuring weather and climate and are especially useful in remote places. The best available information from satellites will help to quantify how weather and climate works in the Sahara. We also expect to improve the way the satellites are able to make their measurements too. Because models are so important to understanding and predicting weather, we will make heavy use of them in this work. We want to know how well the models work over the Sahara and what can be done to improve them. We are especially interested in seeing whether the models work better if we allow them to deal with small parts of the climate system or whether we can still represent extreme places in the Sahara by ignoring these details in the models.

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  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: NE/G523947/1
    Funder Contribution: 68,543 GBP

    Doctoral Training Partnerships: a range of postgraduate training is funded by the Research Councils. For information on current funding routes, see the common terminology at https://www.ukri.org/apply-for-funding/how-we-fund-studentships/. Training grants may be to one organisation or to a consortia of research organisations. This portal will show the lead organisation only.

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