Powered by OpenAIRE graph
Found an issue? Give us feedback

University of London

Country: United Kingdom

University of London

Funder
Top 100 values are shown in the filters
Results number
arrow_drop_down
6,641 Projects, page 1 of 1,329
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: 2236043

    Manam is one of Papua New Guinea's most frequently active volcanoes. Manam is capable of a full spectrum of volcanic hazards including pyroclastic flows, lava flows and tephra deposition. As such this volcano poses significant risk to communities living close by and further afield as well as to air traffic. The installation of monitoring equipment has been impeded by social-economic factors and by the altitude and topography of the summit vents which make proximal measurements extremely challenging. This project proposes a systematic assessment of volcanic hazard at Manam with the aim to produce comprehensive hazard maps and protocols for different eruptive scenarios. Crucially, a component of this project will include novel methods for volcanic hazard communication and planning with consultation with the local communities and accessible outputs for these communities and policy makers in Papua New Guinea. Field research will include assessments of vulnerability and local volcanic hazard perceptions. Volcanic gas measurements, seismology and satellite observations methods will be used in order to establish baseline activity, identify any eruptive precursor signals and the cascading hazards. Drone-based strategies will utilised to take aerial measurements of gases and hazards contributing to technological advancement of research at remote volcanoes.

    more_vert
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: G0900098
    Funder Contribution: 422,579 GBP

    The blood delivers nutrients to the different organs of our body. The blood circulates through vessels that are lined by specialised cells called endothelial cells. These cells have a key role in maintaining the health of blood vessels. Endothelial cell function is affected in many different diseases such as diabetes, thrombosis, inflammation, atherosclerosis and cancer. Here, we propose to study the mechanisms that control endothelial cell-cell adhesion, proliferation and migration known to be dysfunctional or aberrantly activated during such pathological conditions. To understand how these different endothelial cell functions are regulated is fundamental to develop new therapeutic strategies to prevent or inhibit such conditions.

    visibility12
    visibilityviews12
    downloaddownloads50
    Powered by Usage counts
    more_vert
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: ST/X005577/1
    Funder Contribution: 318,609 GBP

    This JeS form is a resubmission of part of the UCL DiRAC Operations grant request containing only the DI posts which have been approved for funding at 100% by STFC.

    more_vert
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: NE/I020571/2
    Funder Contribution: 175,399 GBP

    How does the Earth's climate recover from events of rapid and extreme global warming or cooling? Why have the huge fluctuations in atmospheric CO2 in the geological past not caused runaway climate effects, making the Earth become Venus- or Mars-like? Silicate weathering of the continents is the main CO2 removal process, and therefore a dominant long-term climate control mechanism. However the debate on what controls silicate weathering, and therefore atmospheric CO2, is still contentious and ongoing. A correct understanding of the controls on weathering, and its link to atmospheric CO2 levels is critical, because 1) it is possible that weathering is the process that has kept Earth's climate in the relatively narrow bounds required for life over the past several hundred million years; 2) it is impossible to decipher the causes and consequences of long-term climate variations through Earth's history without accurate weathering data, which in turn impacts on our understanding of current climate; 3) comprehension of climate systems leads to more accurate modelling of future climate change; 4) rapid global climate change inevitably leads to large mass extinctions. Therefore it is important to unravel the link between extinctions and the Earth's climate systems, including CO2 control. Lithium isotopes have gained much interest over the past few years because large variations in the Li isotope ratio in rivers and clays are caused by silicate weathering processes. Furthermore, unlike tracers of weathering used previously, Li isotopes also respond to the intensity of weathering, and therefore can be linked directly to weathering rates. This is critical, because for the first time is gives us a window into the variation of weathering rates through time, which in turn means we can use the Earth's past climate variations as a natural laboratory. Three of the largest climate fluctuations and mass extinctions in Earth's history will be examined and modelled, primarily using Li isotopes, but also several other tracers, which will serve to reveal information on marine and volcanic conditions at the time. These geological periods (the end-Ordovician glaciation (450 Ma (million years ago)), the Permo-Triassic event (251 Ma) and the Cenomanian-Turonian Ocean Anoxic Event (94 Ma)), represent times when rapid warming or cooling of Earth's climate occurred, resulting in the extinction of up to 90% of life on Earth. Samples from these time periods exist in the form of marine calcium carbonate. This was precipitated (either inorganically, or via various life forms) in the oceans at the time, and provides a record of ocean chemistry, which in turn is directly linked to the atmospheric conditions. Analysing Li isotopes is a complex procedure, and will be undertaken at Oxford University. Collaborations will exist with Prof. Jan Veizer (Ottawa University) and Dr. Christoph Korte (Copenhagen University), who are specialists in the studied time periods, with Prof. Andy Ridgwell (Bristol University), who is an expert climate modeller, and with Prof. David Harper, who is an expert in mass extinctions. By understanding weathering and climatic responses to periods of rapid global warming and cooling we will gain critical information on Earth's climate feedbacks, and on processes that led to the extinction of vast proportions of the biosphere.

    visibility27
    visibilityviews27
    downloaddownloads13
    Powered by Usage counts
    more_vert
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: G7908507
    Funder Contribution: 4,515,740 GBP

    Abstracts are not currently available in GtR for all funded research. This is normally because the abstract was not required at the time of proposal submission, but may be because it included sensitive information such as personal details.

    visibility2
    visibilityviews2
    downloaddownloads14
    Powered by Usage counts
    more_vert
Powered by OpenAIRE graph
Found an issue? Give us feedback

Do the share buttons not appear? Please make sure, any blocking addon is disabled, and then reload the page.

Content report
No reports available
Funder report
No option selected
arrow_drop_down

Do you wish to download a CSV file? Note that this process may take a while.

There was an error in csv downloading. Please try again later.