Powered by OpenAIRE graph
Found an issue? Give us feedback

University of Northampton

Country: United Kingdom

University of Northampton

Funder
Top 100 values are shown in the filters
Results number
arrow_drop_down
19 Projects, page 1 of 4
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: ES/S014268/1
    Funder Contribution: 35,475 GBP

    The overarching purpose of this proposal is to create a new partnership between UK and Japan-based academic and professional networks in the field of volunteering in law enforcement and public safety, form lasting links between UK and Japan and establish a foundation for collaboration beyond the project. Volunteering in law enforcement and public safety is an emergent research agenda in both the UK and Japan, yet significant opportunities exist to learn from the cultural contexts concerning how law enforcement agencies engage with the community to achieve their goals and enable citizens to protect people from harm. The applicants to the proposed project are at the forefront of recent academic enquiry into volunteering in law enforcement and public safety in the respective countries and have strong networks across academia and into different policing/volunteering contexts. They are positioned to pump-prime UK-Japan collaborations across volunteering in law enforcement and community safety, each holding significant experience, expertise and knowledge in the field which holds value to the strategic and practical development of volunteering in each site. Citizens have assumed a prominent role in the delivery of policing in the UK since before the development of organised law enforcement (Britton and Callender, 2018), with the Special Constabulary having deep historical roots. Special Constables are unpaid volunteers who, after successful completion of their training, hold the same warranted powers as 'Regular', paid police officers (Callender et al., 2018a). More recently, however, a multitude of volunteering opportunities have been created within policing for citizens to contribute to meeting policing objectives (Callender et al., 2018b) and a recent benchmarking exercise conducted across England and Wales outlined how there are over 38,000 volunteers operating within policing organisations, including 11,992 Special Constables and 8,265 Police Support Volunteers (Britton et al., 2018). There are also an estimated 40,000+ volunteers in other volunteer roles closely working with policing, including Community Speedwatch, Neighbourhood Watch, victim support services, street pastors and similar roles. In September 2003, the 'Action Plan for Realizing a Powerful Society against Crime' was launched in Japan, led by the Prime Minister. By 2014, there were some 48,000 crime prevention organisations with approximately 3 million members, meaning that 1 in 38 adults in Japan is a crime prevention volunteer (Hino, 2018). Most crime prevention volunteer organizations consist of local residents and parents of elementary school children and are independent of the police, requiring an intimate partnership between citizens and the police. To widen participation in volunteering activities, Hino (2018) advocates a 'Plus Bouhan' (Plus Crime Prevention) approach which adds aspects of crime prevention to daily activities in the community. Volunteering in law enforcement and public safety are therefore argued to be prominent in both sites, though different in the relative level of involvement of citizens at protecting people from harm. To enable the exchange of research and commercial knowledge, collaborative activities will be conducted over a one-year period. The activities conducted during the formative stages of the partnership include: - two cultural exchange trips, with academic delegations traveling between the UK and Japan; - collaborative analysis of qualitative data to explore synergies in ideologies, strategies, leadership and practices concerning volunteerism within law enforcement and public safety; - a symposium outlining the results and value of the partnership will be conducted at an international conference; and - local activities in each country in the form of presentations and briefings to local communities and police forces to embed learning and knowledge from the exchange.

    more_vert
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: AH/K003844/1
    Funder Contribution: 22,590 GBP

    Is television culture being digitally transformed? The huge range of websites dedicated to particular TV shows, the variety of television available on video-sharing sites like YouTube, and availability of recent programming on 'view on demand' (VoD) platforms suggest that the answer is yes. Advances in production, recording, and communication technologies have undeniably changed the way TV is produced, distributed, watched and discussed and a recent report suggests that we are watching more TV now than five years ago (Foster and Broughton, 2011). BBC data shows that iPlayer received 141 million requests for TV and radio programmes in April 2011 (BBC report, 2011); Foster and Broughton's analysis posits that around 5% of UK fixed broadband and mobile network income (approximately £1 billion) can be attributed to video downloads and streaming; and all major content providers have their own VoD services and make content for mobile and other media. While a drama is off the air, minisodes released through the official website keep an audience engaged. Fan forums exchange the latest news about developing storylines or cast and crew changes. Ancillary materials (DVD extras or dedicated TV documentaries like Doctor Who Confidential) discuss special effects or action for HD, or how CGI is used to create the latest spectacular creature or place. Much of this activity is a continuation from old media to new media. Cult TV scholars have experience in studying what place special effects have in television, how audiences consume their favourite show, or how TV is officially and unofficially discussed, debated and archived. The Cult TV: TV Cultures Network will bring together scholars with this experience, along with people who create and produce television, those who train the creative industries workforce, the museums and organisations charged with preserving television as part of our culture, and fan-scholars who, more unofficially, also debate, collect and archive TV culture to discuss developments in digital-era television. Representatives from these various groups will identify key areas for debate and development, discussing who 'authors' or 'owns' television content and characters now they are spread across multiple media, or analysing ways that TV culture enriches social identity. The emphasis is on pooling knowledge and approaches in order to develop new ways of cooperating to tackle problems (e.g. fulfilling the demands of new TV industry for a range of skills in its workers) or developing future strategies (e.g. for archiving TV as cultural memory). Planned activities such as workshops and symposia will encourage debate among different stakeholder groups, and some will be designed to engage the public, keeping the debates accessible. A directory of academic expertise aims to stimulate ongoing collaboration between academic researchers and anyone with an interest in producing, preserving or consuming television. An advisory paper will identify significant areas for development, and aims to shape the direction of future strategies for digital-era television. The input of non-academic participants will help ground the discussion and the network will benefit equally from academic expertise and from the mainstream address of TV fan-scholars and bloggers and other non-academic members, enabling publications arising from the network's activities to present complex ideas in language readily accessible to a general audience. The network has high potential to contribute to ongoing and vital debates about public policy on digital TV and its future development. Industry, the skills training sector, museums and archives, and the third sector will benefit from academic expertise that can enhance their own activities and planning around digital transformations. In more general terms, the project aims to draw attention to the significant place of television in society and in generational and cultural memory.

    more_vert
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: AH/I001638/1
    Funder Contribution: 63,346 GBP

    On 7 May 1915, the German submarine U20 fired a torpedo at the passenger liner Lusitania. Eighteen minutes later the pride of the Cunard fleet disappeared beneath the waves. The sinking of the Lusitania ushered in a new, more savage era in naval warfare. It was a passenger vessel struck without warning by an unseen opponent; the victims were all civilians. Thus, both in its method and in its results, this action brought the stark brutality of 'total war' to the world's oceans.\n\nFor the Royal Navy, the sinking of the Lusitania has a further significance. The demise of this ship is proof for many of the backwardness of British naval thinking. That so important a vessel could be allowed to travel alone and unprotected in dangerous waters shows that no thought had been given by those in charge of Britain's maritime defences to the peril the country faced. Had the navy been truly prepared for 'total' warfare, so the argument runs, it would have anticipated that Germany would seek to defeat Britain with an attack on its trade and measures to protect British commerce would have been developed ahead of time and put into place from the outset.\n\nThis is a compelling argument, and it is true that Britain was not prepared for unrestricted submarine warfare. Yet, ironically, the Lusitania is proof that, before the First World War, the navy had given thought to the possibility of a German assault on British trade. For the liner that succumbed so dramatically to a German torpedo in 1915 had been conceived specifically to protect British commerce. The product of an agreement between Cunard and the government, the Lusitania was meant to serve as passenger vessels in peacetime but to become an auxiliary cruiser in wartime. To this end, it was built with turbines capable of generating a high speed, large coal bunkers designed to provide endurance, and pre-established fittings for gun mountings, intended to facilitate an easy-to-install offensive capability.\n\nThe Admiralty's decision to subsidize Cunard to build fast liners reflected the navy's belief that a new and dangerous threat to British commerce was being created. The threat in question came from Germany, whose fleet of Atlantic liners were viewed with apprehension. Intelligence suggested that these ships were capable of great speed, were manned largely by reservists and always had arms on board. Thus, the moment war broke out, it was feared that they would be converted into auxiliary warships and sent to prey on the trade routes. Because of their high speed no British merchantmen would be able to escape them and no British warships would be able to catch them. They would be in a position to run amok on the sea lanes; hence the need for British liners even faster to track them down.\n\nPaying Cunard to build the Lusitania was the first step in a twelve year history of efforts to counter the threat to British commerce from Germany's transatlantic liners. These efforts included radical new warship designs; a campaign to change international law to outlaw the conversion of liners on the high seas; and the establishment of a new global intelligence network to determine the location of German liners and route British ships away from them. Finally, in 1912 the decision was taken to arm British merchant vessels for their own defence.\n\nThese efforts to defend British trade from German attack absorbed considerable resources. Yet, despite the time and money devoted to this issue, the story of the threat from Germany's 'ocean greyhounds' and the British response has never been told. This project will remedy this. Focusing on the perceived threat posed by Germany, it will examine why the British naval authorities anticipated a danger from armed German liners and will explain how they chose to meet this challenge. This will illuminate an important but unknown area of our naval history and go some way to explaining why Britiain's trade defence policy was orientated in the wrong direction in 1914

    more_vert
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: 119645/1
    Funder Contribution: 4,960 GBP

    Increased interest in Theatre for Development (TfD) has generated critical attention from practitioners and critics but this has overlooked two unfortunate factors; increased gender divide and the continuing undervaluing and marginalisation of women. This study investigates the cultural representation of women in Nigeria and how TfD can be used effectively to empower and mobilise women's participation in development and change. It investigates the growth of local NGOs and women's organisations and TfD practice in Nigeria, the challenges facing its use of indigenous performance techniques to facilitate women's participation in development at grassroots level and the possibilities of alternative models.

    more_vert
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: AH/I504818/1
    Funder Contribution: 55,050 GBP

    Doctoral Training Partnerships: a range of postgraduate training is funded by the Research Councils. For information on current funding routes, see the common terminology at https://www.ukri.org/apply-for-funding/how-we-fund-studentships/. Training grants may be to one organisation or to a consortia of research organisations. This portal will show the lead organisation only.

    more_vert
Powered by OpenAIRE graph
Found an issue? Give us feedback

Do the share buttons not appear? Please make sure, any blocking addon is disabled, and then reload the page.

Content report
No reports available
Funder report
No option selected
arrow_drop_down

Do you wish to download a CSV file? Note that this process may take a while.

There was an error in csv downloading. Please try again later.