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LiU

Linköping University
Country: Sweden
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278 Projects, page 1 of 56
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 751375
    Overall Budget: 185,857 EURFunder Contribution: 185,857 EUR

    Developing new energy sources is an urgent issue, as fossil fuels will be exhausted in near future. Solar cells system is a promising renewable energy technology that converts sunlight to electricity. Today, crystalline silicon exhibits high power conversion efficiencies (PCE) and dominates the solar panel industry. The problem of silicon solar cells is that it suffers from high production cost due to tedious processing condition. Recently, organic-lead-halide perovskites have offered the promise of a breakthrough for next-generation solar cell devices, and the PCE is up to 22.6% over the past few years. In spite of high efficiency, the presence of toxic lead (Pb) will become problematic in the future for widespread deployment of this technology. It is prospective to replace Pb with less toxic tin (Sn). However, the poor stability (the easily oxidization of Sn2+ to Sn4+ by O2) and low efficiency are two major issues of Sn-based perovskites. This proposal targets air-stable, high efficient Sn-based perovskite solar cells by developing new Sn-based perovskites and electron transporting layer to match the band energy of perovskites. The expected fruits of the project will contribute to European excellence and competiveness in renewable energy field. The successful transfer of the results will promote economic growth and job supplies. In addition to the scientific objectives, the proposal will help the fellow to new acquire knowledge and reinforce his quality as an independent researcher, such as creativity, independent thinking, leadership and transfer qualities, which are critical for the fellow to secure a long-term position in a European university/institution, and eventually become a world renowned expert in the energy research field.

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  • Funder: EC Project Code: 101024191
    Overall Budget: 191,852 EURFunder Contribution: 191,852 EUR

    The following proposal deals with the fabrication and validation of a wearable patch for continuous dopamine sensing, realized using biocompatible materials and additive manufacturing techniques, which would allow to monitor the evolution throughout the day of this hormone which is fundamental in the treatment of many neurological diseases. The candidate wants to provide a simple and non-invasive method which could potentially improve the quality of life of millions of patients and families affected by these diseases and reduce the growing social costs to treat them. The device is thought to be self-powered, using the patients’ body heat as energy source, and works by analysing the dopamine concentration in human sweat, therefore no surgical procedure is required. To detect dopamine concentration, organic electrochemical transistors are used, exploiting their amplification ability to obtain a highly sensitive monitoring device. The patch is also equipped with a radio-frequency antenna for data transmission to medical personnel monitoring real-time the dopamine evolution in the patients. Finally, the patch is designed to be conformable, lightweight and cheap to reduce the patients’ discomfort.

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  • Funder: EC Project Code: 798861
    Overall Budget: 185,857 EURFunder Contribution: 185,857 EUR

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) based on organometallic halide perovskites have attracted increasing interest due to their unique properties, such as high colour purity, easily tunable optoelectronic properties, and solution processable for low-cost and large-arear manufacturing, showing great potential in displays and lighting applications. Even though the photonic and electronic properties of perovskites are very attractive, the poor stability and relatively low photoluminescent efficiency are two major problems that limit their progress in LEDs. In this project, I aim to address these challenges and develop efficient and stable perovskite LEDs. I propose a) to design and synthesize Ruddlesden-Popper perovskite (RPP) emitters with stable crystal structures and excellent optoelectronic properties, with the help of first-principles calculations, b) to deposit high-quality RPP films using new synthetic routes, and c) to fabricate efficient and stable LEDs with performance beyond the state of the art, by coupling device engineering with device physics investigations. This project will increase the fundamental knowledge concerning RPP materials and devices. The expected outcomes are new type perovskite materials with good optoelectronic properties, as well as stable and efficient LEDs. In addition, I will be trained to develop new interdisciplinary knowledge and skills and to reach professional maturity by implementing the project. In addition to individual development, successful implementation of this project will also promote the international competitiveness of the host organization on research of perovskite optoelectronics. Potential commercialization of the new perovskite materials and LEDs products will also generate economic growth and new job opportunities for the Europe society.

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  • Funder: SNSF Project Code: 191362
    Funder Contribution: 63,700
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  • Funder: EC Project Code: 891663
    Overall Budget: 191,852 EURFunder Contribution: 191,852 EUR

    High embryonic mortality at the peri-implantation period (70%) is accounted after pig embryo transfer (ET), which is almost double than that of natural breeding or artificial insemination (AI). Since pregnancy is an interesting immunological paradox, our starting hypothesis is that the mechanisms regulating the maternal immune response to the embryos may be less efficient in the case of ET pregnancies, where the transferred embryos are allogeneic (e.g. contain paternal and maternal material unrelated to the recipient mother) than after natural breeding or AI, where only paternal material is unrelated to the mother (semi-allogeneic). This difference could be behind the increased embryonic death. The project will study transcriptomic and cytokine changes of porcine endometrial tissue in the presence of semi-allogeneic and allogeneic embryos during the peri-implantation period and also in the placenta of healthy and arrested fetuses. The results of the project will unveil mechanisms behind embryo-maternal dialogue. This fact is relevant in view of the necessary implementation of emergent breeding technologies, as embryo transfer (ET), for supporting sustainability and competitiveness of the European pig sector. EU is currently second biggest pig producer in the world and the largest exporter of antibiotic- and residue-free pig products derived from animals raised on highest welfare standards and with the highest genetic value. The understanding of embryo-maternal dialogue under allogeneic environments might be determinant to implement new strategies to increase the reproductive performance after ET not only in pigs but also, comparatively, in other livestock species and even in humans, where the use of donor oocytes for IVF is currently increasing. This project, with a focus on pregnancy immunological regulation, is of utmost interest for the EU goals, contributing to determine which factors still jeopardize full fertility and prolificacy when applying ET technology.

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