search
Include:
The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
16,164 Research products, page 1 of 1,617

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
  • 0501 psychology and cognitive sciences

10
arrow_drop_down
Relevance
arrow_drop_down
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Robert P O'Shea; Urte Roeber; Nicholas J. Wade;
    Publisher: SAGE Publications

    Gottfried Wilhelm Osann (1796–1866) was a German scientist most renowned for his work in chemistry and physics. However, inspired by Goethe’s work on color, he published a paper on simultaneous color contrast in 1833 using a method that is similar to that of later authors: reflection of an achromatic spot from an angled piece of glass. He wrote at least four more papers on color contrasts, in 1836 using essentially the same method as credited to others. We provide a description and translation of Osann’s 1833 paper and the relevant part of his 1836 paper, say why these papers are interesting and important, give some biographical information about Osann, comment on the fate of Osann’s papers, and describe Osann’s other papers on color.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Tamás Káldi; Tamás Káldi; Ágnes Szöllösi; Ágnes Szöllösi; Anna Babarczy; Anna Babarczy;
    Publisher: Frontiers Media S.A.

    The present work investigates the memory accessibility of linguistically focused elements and the representation of the alternatives for these elements (i.e., their possible replacements) in Working Memory (WM) and in delayed recognition memory in the case of the Hungarian pre-verbal focus construction (preVf). In two probe recognition experiments we presented preVf and corresponding focusless neutral sentences embedded in five-sentence stories. Stories were followed by the presentation of sentence probes in one of three conditions: (i) the probe was identical to the original sentence in the story, (ii) the focused word (i.e., target) was replaced by a semantically related word and (iii) the target word was replaced by a semantically unrelated but contextually suitable word. In Experiment 1, probes were presented immediately after the stories measuring WM performance, while in Experiment 2, blocks of six stories were presented and sentences were probed with a 2-minute delay measuring delayed recognition memory performance. Results revealed an advantage of the focused element in immediate but not in delayed retrieval. We found no effect of sentence type on the recognition of the two different probe types in WM performance. However, results pertaining to the memory accessibility of focus alternatives in delayed retrieval showed an interference effect resulting in a lower memory performance. We conclude that this effect is indirect evidence for the enhanced activation of focus alternatives. The present work is novel in two respects. First, no study has been conducted on the memory representation of focused elements and their alternatives in the case of the structurally marked Hungarian pre-verbal focus construction. Second, to our knowledge, this is the first study that investigates the focus representation accounts for WM and delayed recognition memory using the same stimuli and same measured variables. Since both experiments used exactly the same stimulus set, and they only differed in terms of the timing of recognition probes, the principle of ceteris paribus fully applied with respect to how we addressed our research question regarding the two different memory systems.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Johanna Vartiainen; Silvia Aggujaro; Minna Lehtonen; Annika Hultén; Matti Laine; Riitta Salmelin;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV

    Despite considerable research interest, it is still an open issue as to how morphologically complex words such as "car+s" are represented and processed in the brain. We studied the neural correlates of the processing of inflected nouns in the morphologically rich Finnish language. Previous behavioral studies in Finnish have yielded a robust inflectional processing cost, i.e., inflected words are harder to recognize than otherwise matched morphologically simple words. Theoretically this effect could stem either from decomposition of inflected words into a stem and a suffix at input level and/or from subsequent recombination at the semantic-syntactic level to arrive at an interpretation of the word. To shed light on this issue, we used magnetoencephalography to reveal the time course and localization of neural effects of morphological structure and frequency of written words. Ten subjects silently read high- and low-frequency Finnish words in inflected and monomorphemic form. Morphological complexity was accompanied by stronger and longer-lasting activation of the left superior temporal cortex from 200 ms onwards. Earlier effects of morphology were not found, supporting the view that the well-established behavioral processing cost for inflected words stems from the semantic-syntactic level rather than from early decomposition. Since the effect of morphology was detected throughout the range of word frequencies employed, the majority of inflected Finnish words appears to be represented in decomposed form and only very high-frequency inflected words may acquire full-form representations.

  • Authors: 
    Hannah Taylor; Jeannine A. Gailey;
    Publisher: Informa UK Limited

    ABSTRACTIn June of 2018, AMC debuted the series Dietland, a television show about a woman of size named Plum who plans to have weight loss surgery until she begins a journey of self-acceptance. Whi...

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Zuzanna Rucińska; Shaun Gallagher;
    Country: Belgium

    AbstractThis paper considers the epistemic role that embodiment plays in imagining. We focus on two aspects of embodied cognition understood in its strong sense: explicit motoric processes related to performance, and neuronal processes rooted in bodily and action processes, and describe their role in imagining. The paper argues that these two aspects of strongly embodied cognition can play distinctive and positive roles in constraining imagining, thereby complementing Amy Kind's argument for the epistemic relevance of imagination "under constraints" and Magdalena Balcerak Jackson's argument for justification by imagination.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Jonathan Judaken;
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC

    This article opens with an assessment of the narratives that emerged in the immediate wake of the Charlie Hebdo / Hyper Cacher events in January 2015. It does so by examining the differing hashtags of the moment—#jesuisCharlie, #jesuisjuif, #LassBat—and how each offered a distilled account of what the moment meant; these competing interpretations were echoed in the news coverage and the commentary that followed. The article proceeds to set out how this special issue reframes and reevaluates the recent history of relations between Jews and Muslims in France. Each author suggests that Judeophobia and Islamophobia are inextricably entangled in ways more complicated than simple formulas or hashtags can encapsulate. Taking on the suggestion that “Muslims are the new Jews” in France (or in Europe), the special issue instead urges an appreciation of the interlocked vulnerabilities and insecurities of both Jews and Muslims. Such an approach requires a recognition of the structural and institutional forces and ideologies that have shaped their interconnected destinies in the last generation.

  • Publication . Article . 1993
    Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Jock McCulloch;
    Publisher: SAGE Publications
  • Authors: 
    William Elliott;
    Publisher: Informa UK Limited

    Though studies have clearly illustrated that education is one of the primary paths to upward mobility, a growing body of research is beginning to show that the returns on education are determined m...

  • Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Brian F. O’Neill;
    Publisher: SAGE Publications

    This essay discusses the three most recent posthumous publications of French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu. With the 2019 release of Classification Struggles, coming after On the State (2014) and Manet (2017), and covering Bourdieu’s first lectures as the Chair in Sociology at the Collège de France from 1981 to 1982, this emerging oral tradition marks an opportune moment to re-examine Bourdieu’s oeuvre in light of a mode of presentation and knowledge transference that is unprecedented in scope within the sociological canon. Taken together, these series of lectures, but also notes, essays by his collaborators, and even an unfinished book length manuscript, constitute a fascinating process of analysis of the wide range of topics that Bourdieu tackled throughout his career. As such, these works lend important insights that should aid readers in re-evaluating Bourdieu’s more polished works. However, beyond the additional insights that may lead international sociologists to a more thorough understanding of Bourdieu’s best-known theories, one finds, when examined chronologically, the slow march of Bourdieu’s progress towards a fully-fledged theory of the state, a topic that he did not begin to formally analyze until he began lecturing at the Collège de France.

  • Publication . Article . 2016
    Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Donal Sarsfield;
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press (CUP)

    It is now six weeks since I stepped between the train and the platform at Frankfurt am Hain, rushing to catch the slightly delayed 17:34 train to Darmstadt Hauptbahnhof. I'm not sure why I was rushing – the first concert was not until 20:00, so I had plenty of time. My right foot fell through, and the front of my leg hit the step of the train quite hard. I thought it would bleed, but it didn't. It just turned to a very hard bruise (haematoma I was later told). You couldn't really see the raised bump with the eye, it wasn't sore, but if you ran your hand over my leg you could feel it. I had booked my train from Liverpool specifically so I could see Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker's Vortex Temporum once more. I had seen it at Sadler's Wells and had been pleased, but was lucky enough to see Rosas performing Work/Travail/Arbeid as an installation at the Turbine Hall at Tate Modern. There, it was a revelation. Whether it was the space, the extra forces, or just the freedom to walk away, I was entranced. Best of all it was free. She was there herself, making comments, keeping an eye on things.

search
Include:
The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
16,164 Research products, page 1 of 1,617
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Robert P O'Shea; Urte Roeber; Nicholas J. Wade;
    Publisher: SAGE Publications

    Gottfried Wilhelm Osann (1796–1866) was a German scientist most renowned for his work in chemistry and physics. However, inspired by Goethe’s work on color, he published a paper on simultaneous color contrast in 1833 using a method that is similar to that of later authors: reflection of an achromatic spot from an angled piece of glass. He wrote at least four more papers on color contrasts, in 1836 using essentially the same method as credited to others. We provide a description and translation of Osann’s 1833 paper and the relevant part of his 1836 paper, say why these papers are interesting and important, give some biographical information about Osann, comment on the fate of Osann’s papers, and describe Osann’s other papers on color.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Tamás Káldi; Tamás Káldi; Ágnes Szöllösi; Ágnes Szöllösi; Anna Babarczy; Anna Babarczy;
    Publisher: Frontiers Media S.A.

    The present work investigates the memory accessibility of linguistically focused elements and the representation of the alternatives for these elements (i.e., their possible replacements) in Working Memory (WM) and in delayed recognition memory in the case of the Hungarian pre-verbal focus construction (preVf). In two probe recognition experiments we presented preVf and corresponding focusless neutral sentences embedded in five-sentence stories. Stories were followed by the presentation of sentence probes in one of three conditions: (i) the probe was identical to the original sentence in the story, (ii) the focused word (i.e., target) was replaced by a semantically related word and (iii) the target word was replaced by a semantically unrelated but contextually suitable word. In Experiment 1, probes were presented immediately after the stories measuring WM performance, while in Experiment 2, blocks of six stories were presented and sentences were probed with a 2-minute delay measuring delayed recognition memory performance. Results revealed an advantage of the focused element in immediate but not in delayed retrieval. We found no effect of sentence type on the recognition of the two different probe types in WM performance. However, results pertaining to the memory accessibility of focus alternatives in delayed retrieval showed an interference effect resulting in a lower memory performance. We conclude that this effect is indirect evidence for the enhanced activation of focus alternatives. The present work is novel in two respects. First, no study has been conducted on the memory representation of focused elements and their alternatives in the case of the structurally marked Hungarian pre-verbal focus construction. Second, to our knowledge, this is the first study that investigates the focus representation accounts for WM and delayed recognition memory using the same stimuli and same measured variables. Since both experiments used exactly the same stimulus set, and they only differed in terms of the timing of recognition probes, the principle of ceteris paribus fully applied with respect to how we addressed our research question regarding the two different memory systems.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Johanna Vartiainen; Silvia Aggujaro; Minna Lehtonen; Annika Hultén; Matti Laine; Riitta Salmelin;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV

    Despite considerable research interest, it is still an open issue as to how morphologically complex words such as "car+s" are represented and processed in the brain. We studied the neural correlates of the processing of inflected nouns in the morphologically rich Finnish language. Previous behavioral studies in Finnish have yielded a robust inflectional processing cost, i.e., inflected words are harder to recognize than otherwise matched morphologically simple words. Theoretically this effect could stem either from decomposition of inflected words into a stem and a suffix at input level and/or from subsequent recombination at the semantic-syntactic level to arrive at an interpretation of the word. To shed light on this issue, we used magnetoencephalography to reveal the time course and localization of neural effects of morphological structure and frequency of written words. Ten subjects silently read high- and low-frequency Finnish words in inflected and monomorphemic form. Morphological complexity was accompanied by stronger and longer-lasting activation of the left superior temporal cortex from 200 ms onwards. Earlier effects of morphology were not found, supporting the view that the well-established behavioral processing cost for inflected words stems from the semantic-syntactic level rather than from early decomposition. Since the effect of morphology was detected throughout the range of word frequencies employed, the majority of inflected Finnish words appears to be represented in decomposed form and only very high-frequency inflected words may acquire full-form representations.

  • Authors: 
    Hannah Taylor; Jeannine A. Gailey;
    Publisher: Informa UK Limited

    ABSTRACTIn June of 2018, AMC debuted the series Dietland, a television show about a woman of size named Plum who plans to have weight loss surgery until she begins a journey of self-acceptance. Whi...

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Zuzanna Rucińska; Shaun Gallagher;
    Country: Belgium

    AbstractThis paper considers the epistemic role that embodiment plays in imagining. We focus on two aspects of embodied cognition understood in its strong sense: explicit motoric processes related to performance, and neuronal processes rooted in bodily and action processes, and describe their role in imagining. The paper argues that these two aspects of strongly embodied cognition can play distinctive and positive roles in constraining imagining, thereby complementing Amy Kind's argument for the epistemic relevance of imagination "under constraints" and Magdalena Balcerak Jackson's argument for justification by imagination.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Jonathan Judaken;
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC

    This article opens with an assessment of the narratives that emerged in the immediate wake of the Charlie Hebdo / Hyper Cacher events in January 2015. It does so by examining the differing hashtags of the moment—#jesuisCharlie, #jesuisjuif, #LassBat—and how each offered a distilled account of what the moment meant; these competing interpretations were echoed in the news coverage and the commentary that followed. The article proceeds to set out how this special issue reframes and reevaluates the recent history of relations between Jews and Muslims in France. Each author suggests that Judeophobia and Islamophobia are inextricably entangled in ways more complicated than simple formulas or hashtags can encapsulate. Taking on the suggestion that “Muslims are the new Jews” in France (or in Europe), the special issue instead urges an appreciation of the interlocked vulnerabilities and insecurities of both Jews and Muslims. Such an approach requires a recognition of the structural and institutional forces and ideologies that have shaped their interconnected destinies in the last generation.

  • Publication . Article . 1993
    Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Jock McCulloch;
    Publisher: SAGE Publications
  • Authors: 
    William Elliott;
    Publisher: Informa UK Limited

    Though studies have clearly illustrated that education is one of the primary paths to upward mobility, a growing body of research is beginning to show that the returns on education are determined m...

  • Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Brian F. O’Neill;
    Publisher: SAGE Publications

    This essay discusses the three most recent posthumous publications of French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu. With the 2019 release of Classification Struggles, coming after On the State (2014) and Manet (2017), and covering Bourdieu’s first lectures as the Chair in Sociology at the Collège de France from 1981 to 1982, this emerging oral tradition marks an opportune moment to re-examine Bourdieu’s oeuvre in light of a mode of presentation and knowledge transference that is unprecedented in scope within the sociological canon. Taken together, these series of lectures, but also notes, essays by his collaborators, and even an unfinished book length manuscript, constitute a fascinating process of analysis of the wide range of topics that Bourdieu tackled throughout his career. As such, these works lend important insights that should aid readers in re-evaluating Bourdieu’s more polished works. However, beyond the additional insights that may lead international sociologists to a more thorough understanding of Bourdieu’s best-known theories, one finds, when examined chronologically, the slow march of Bourdieu’s progress towards a fully-fledged theory of the state, a topic that he did not begin to formally analyze until he began lecturing at the Collège de France.

  • Publication . Article . 2016
    Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Donal Sarsfield;
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press (CUP)

    It is now six weeks since I stepped between the train and the platform at Frankfurt am Hain, rushing to catch the slightly delayed 17:34 train to Darmstadt Hauptbahnhof. I'm not sure why I was rushing – the first concert was not until 20:00, so I had plenty of time. My right foot fell through, and the front of my leg hit the step of the train quite hard. I thought it would bleed, but it didn't. It just turned to a very hard bruise (haematoma I was later told). You couldn't really see the raised bump with the eye, it wasn't sore, but if you ran your hand over my leg you could feel it. I had booked my train from Liverpool specifically so I could see Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker's Vortex Temporum once more. I had seen it at Sadler's Wells and had been pleased, but was lucky enough to see Rosas performing Work/Travail/Arbeid as an installation at the Turbine Hall at Tate Modern. There, it was a revelation. Whether it was the space, the extra forces, or just the freedom to walk away, I was entranced. Best of all it was free. She was there herself, making comments, keeping an eye on things.