Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
1,582 Research products, page 1 of 159

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
  • Publications
  • Research software
  • Other research products
  • 2017-2021
  • Open Access
  • NL
  • NARCIS
  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage

10
arrow_drop_down
Date (most recent)
arrow_drop_down
  • Publication . Conference object . Article . 2021
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Enrico Liscio; Michiel van der Meer; Catholijn Jonker; Pradeep Murukannaiah;
    Country: Netherlands

    Value alignment is a crucial aspect of ethical multiagent systems. An important step toward value alignment is identifying values specific to an application context. However, identifying contextspecific values is complex and cognitively demanding. To support this process, we develop a methodology and a collaborative web platform that employs AI techniques. We describe this platform, highlighting its intuitive design and implementation.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jasper Van der Steen;
    Country: Netherlands

    Abstract Owing to the prevailing definition of ‘dynasty’ as a line of succession, historians have long neglected the fundamental tensions that underlie succession, and have undervalued both the active attempts of princes to control these tensions as well as their ability to anticipate the need to adjust to changing circumstances. Yet premodern dynasties were well equipped to anticipate and develop coping mechanisms for a wide range of future challenges regarding succession, religion, marital alliances and extinction. They did so by considering alternative scenarios for the future in house regulations. Using as an example the seventeenth-century house of Nassau in the Holy Roman Empire, this article argues that even though conflict remained endemic to dynastic power, future-orientated regulations constituted a basic consensus within princely families on how to deal with conflict, which both reflected and contributed to the associative political practices that held the Holy Roman Empire together.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2021
    Open Access English

    Although a fundamentally humanistic discipline and an activity that takes its drive from human action, translation studies has only very recently started to consider complexity as a suitable paradigm. After four decades of reductionist thought, complexity signals the need for translation studies to acknowledge entropy—the tendency of the universe towards disorder—and the decentralization of translation activities as a characteristic of translation activities in more recent years. Perhaps more significantly, complexity raises the problem of new methodologies that are capable of revealing the n-dimensionality of any translation act. In this context, this chapter examines the possibilities of aligning translation studies to the latest developments in digital humanities and of seeing translation scholarship and scholarly collaboration in translation studies as profoundly non-linear.. As a case in point, I analyze the full corpus of abstracts presented at the 2019 EST congress by means of computational semantic analysis (more specifically, topic modelling and tf-idf). Capturing the multiplicity of translation discourses—in the plural—is essential for mapping out the complexity underpinning the discipline of translation studies, like many scholars before us have rightfully argued.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Michiel Van Oudheusden; Frédéric Claisse; Hans Boeykens;
    Countries: Belgium, Netherlands

    This article introduces and discusses a novel form of scholarly output, the bullshit cartoon abstract, which can be used to illustrate summaries of fictitious research papers for both scholarly and lay readers. Presenting five self-authored examples that meticulously deal with trivial research subjects, from the use of visual mnemonics in education to disaster marketing, the article classifies these abstracts along seven dimensions (analytic, aesthetic, existential, satirical, pedagogical, recreational, and opportunistic) to illuminate how bullshit is enacted in academic writing. Building on this classification, it reappraises academic bullshit(ting) as potentially generative of new and multi-textured expressions of creative scholarship. ispartof: Hyperrhiz issue:24 status: Published online

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Alisa Van de Haar;
    Country: Netherlands

    Thousands of migrants left the Low Countries in the second half of the sixteenth century for religious, political, or economic reasons. They faced many difficulties as they attempted to rebuild their lives abroad, including linguistic obstacles. Many of them moved to England, but proficiency in English was rare among the Netherlandish community. Nevertheless, as this article argues, the language differences did not only pose problems, they also offered opportunities, especially to members of the higher echelons of the Dutch diasporic community. The inhabitants of the Low Countries were widely reputed to have excellent knowledge of languages, and for good reason. This article concentrates on the linguistic strategies of three multilingual individuals who moved across the North Sea: the nobleman Jan van der Noot, the painter Lucas d’Heere, and the merchant Johannes Radermacher. It studies the ways in which they used their proficiency in multiple languages as starting capital to build new social and professional lives for themselves. For example, they used their linguistic skills to appeal to the local aristocracy in order to ensure patronage, to expand social and professional networks by frequenting particular religious language communities, and to offer language instruction. This article therefore contributes to our understanding of linguistic encounters in the everyday lives and struggles of migrants in the sixteenth century.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Marie Levant; Philippe Bourmaud; Sanchez Summerer Karène; Norig Neveu; Séverine GABRY-THIENPONT;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: France, France, France, France, Netherlands

    International audience; How was missionary knowledge received and interpreted by scholars and church historians in Europe and Russia? Many late nineteenth and early twentieth-century academics utilised knowledge production from Christian missions, notably by way of scholarly Orientalism. However, the history of this knowledge is also a history of representations: while missionary knowledge helped showcase the cultural and religious traditions of Eastern Christianity, what were the underlying motives and especially the consequences? This article examines the formulation and circulation of Eastern Christian knowledge on either side of the Mediterranean, especially on the basis of Catholic missionary archives and academic productions, the study of which is sometimes rooted in non-Anglophone academic traditions. The aim is to shed light on how knowledge relating to Eastern Christianity was assimilated in Europe, as well as the role missions played in this process, especially from the last third of the nineteenth century, when the institutions and instruments for the circulation of knowledge emerged. Another objective is to address the circulations and transformations of this knowledge on either side of the Mediterranean: collected and developed in major European libraries and universities, it was integrated by the governance structures of churches, but quite often also returned to the space it originated from, where it was reappropriated and gave rise to patrimonial processes, notably alongside the sometimes tragic experiences of certain communities during the end of the Ottoman Empire and the establishment of new states. Christian missions, at the intersection of East and West, were at the heart of this dynamic .

  • Publication . Doctoral thesis . 2021
    Open Access English

    This dissertation explores the function of architecture in the illustrated manuscripts of the erudite Spanish Benedictine scholar, artist and preacher Juan Ricci de Guevara. Among architectural historians, Ricci has become famous for his invention of the complete architectural Salomonic order, which has been discussed by modern scholars predominantly isolated from its textual context, and from a formal, aesthetic approach. The new, comprehensive approach of Ricci’s scholarship in the manuscripts shows that he referred to architecture continuously. From this starting point the hypothesis is made that architecture for Ricci was a suitable interdisciplinary agent for his innovative ideas. With architecture, he could establish connections between various sources, methods and arguments, while coincidentally maintaining the scientific level of his scholarly work. This dissertation is the first book in which Ricci’s written oeuvre (which was never published and is now kept in Madrid, El Escorial, the Vatican and Montecassino) is assessed in-depth comprehensively. It results in a detailed insight in his formulation of a pivotal role for architecture and the architectural image in seventeenth-century scholarship, as a result of Ricci’s particular fusion of scholarly, artistic and rhetorical approaches. The recognition of this mechanism results in an updated inventory of his manuscripts, a discussion of important but hitherto unknown sections of the writings in which the position of architecture is discussed and legitimized, an adjustment of the modern formal discussion of the complete Salomonic order, a new analysis of Ricci’s presentation of his ideas to Pope Alexander VII in the 1660s, and the identification of a decoration program by Ricci for the basilica of the abbey of Montecassino.

  • Publication . Article . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lin, F.;
    Country: Netherlands
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Milan Mikolaj van Lange;
    Country: Netherlands

    That World War II is connected to emotions seems self-evident. But what did this relationship entail? Did it change over time? And how can we know such things? Milan van Lange’s PhD-thesis ‘Emotional Imprints: A Computer-assisted Analysis of War-related Emotions in Dutch Parliamentary Debates, 1945–1989’ offers a creative and innovative perspective on ‘things we think we know’ regarding emotions related to the aftermath of World War II in the Netherlands. ‘Emotional Imprints’ investigates the role of emotions in the post-war political engagement with the war’s consequences. By applying text mining to identify and quantify emotional expressions in thousands of digitised historical documents, Van Lange analyses not only whether emotions were present, but also how they were expressed in parliamentary debates on people who experienced the long-term effects of the war, such as former collaborators and war criminals, the anti-Nazi resistance, and various groups of war victims. Outcomes of this investigation show how emotions were never absent in the post-war sources analysed. The thesis provides an empirically supported farewell to received wisdoms about a ‘silent’ period in the 1950s, or a strong ‘emotionalisation’ in the 1970s. Rather than emotions making history themselves, politicians gave emotions a role in discussing contemporary matters. This role evolved from ‘descriptive’ to ‘appraising’ and ultimately ‘distant’ and ‘abstract’. The thesis displays how historical research can be enhanced by (re)sources, methods, and ideas from various fields, ranging from social psychology to computer linguistics. ‘Emotional Imprints’ makes an original contribution to methodological innovation highly relevant to historical research – especially in times of mass-digitisation and an increasing availability of digital-born sources.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Mario Damen; Kim Overlaet; Duncan Hardy; Luca Zenobi; Marcus Meer; Rombert Stapel; Robert Stein; Lisa Demets; Marianne Ritsema Van Eck; Arend Elias Oostindiër; +4 more
    Publisher: Amsterdam University Press
    Country: Netherlands

    In recent political and legal history, scholars seldom specify how and why they use the concept of territory. In research on state-formation processes and nation building, for instance, the term mostly designates an enclosed geographical area ruled by a central government. Inspired by ideas from political geographers, this book explores the layered and constantly changing meanings of territory in late medieval and early modern Europe before cartography and state formation turned boundaries and territories into more fixed (but still changeable) geographical entities. Its central thesis is that assessing the notion of territory in a pre-modern setting involves analysing territorial practices: practices that relate people and power to space(s). The essays in this book not only examine the construction and spatial structure of pre-modern territories but also explore their perception and representation through the use of a broad range of sources: from administrative texts to maps, from stained-glass windows to chronicles.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
1,582 Research products, page 1 of 159
  • Publication . Conference object . Article . 2021
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Enrico Liscio; Michiel van der Meer; Catholijn Jonker; Pradeep Murukannaiah;
    Country: Netherlands

    Value alignment is a crucial aspect of ethical multiagent systems. An important step toward value alignment is identifying values specific to an application context. However, identifying contextspecific values is complex and cognitively demanding. To support this process, we develop a methodology and a collaborative web platform that employs AI techniques. We describe this platform, highlighting its intuitive design and implementation.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jasper Van der Steen;
    Country: Netherlands

    Abstract Owing to the prevailing definition of ‘dynasty’ as a line of succession, historians have long neglected the fundamental tensions that underlie succession, and have undervalued both the active attempts of princes to control these tensions as well as their ability to anticipate the need to adjust to changing circumstances. Yet premodern dynasties were well equipped to anticipate and develop coping mechanisms for a wide range of future challenges regarding succession, religion, marital alliances and extinction. They did so by considering alternative scenarios for the future in house regulations. Using as an example the seventeenth-century house of Nassau in the Holy Roman Empire, this article argues that even though conflict remained endemic to dynastic power, future-orientated regulations constituted a basic consensus within princely families on how to deal with conflict, which both reflected and contributed to the associative political practices that held the Holy Roman Empire together.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2021
    Open Access English

    Although a fundamentally humanistic discipline and an activity that takes its drive from human action, translation studies has only very recently started to consider complexity as a suitable paradigm. After four decades of reductionist thought, complexity signals the need for translation studies to acknowledge entropy—the tendency of the universe towards disorder—and the decentralization of translation activities as a characteristic of translation activities in more recent years. Perhaps more significantly, complexity raises the problem of new methodologies that are capable of revealing the n-dimensionality of any translation act. In this context, this chapter examines the possibilities of aligning translation studies to the latest developments in digital humanities and of seeing translation scholarship and scholarly collaboration in translation studies as profoundly non-linear.. As a case in point, I analyze the full corpus of abstracts presented at the 2019 EST congress by means of computational semantic analysis (more specifically, topic modelling and tf-idf). Capturing the multiplicity of translation discourses—in the plural—is essential for mapping out the complexity underpinning the discipline of translation studies, like many scholars before us have rightfully argued.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Michiel Van Oudheusden; Frédéric Claisse; Hans Boeykens;
    Countries: Belgium, Netherlands

    This article introduces and discusses a novel form of scholarly output, the bullshit cartoon abstract, which can be used to illustrate summaries of fictitious research papers for both scholarly and lay readers. Presenting five self-authored examples that meticulously deal with trivial research subjects, from the use of visual mnemonics in education to disaster marketing, the article classifies these abstracts along seven dimensions (analytic, aesthetic, existential, satirical, pedagogical, recreational, and opportunistic) to illuminate how bullshit is enacted in academic writing. Building on this classification, it reappraises academic bullshit(ting) as potentially generative of new and multi-textured expressions of creative scholarship. ispartof: Hyperrhiz issue:24 status: Published online

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Alisa Van de Haar;
    Country: Netherlands

    Thousands of migrants left the Low Countries in the second half of the sixteenth century for religious, political, or economic reasons. They faced many difficulties as they attempted to rebuild their lives abroad, including linguistic obstacles. Many of them moved to England, but proficiency in English was rare among the Netherlandish community. Nevertheless, as this article argues, the language differences did not only pose problems, they also offered opportunities, especially to members of the higher echelons of the Dutch diasporic community. The inhabitants of the Low Countries were widely reputed to have excellent knowledge of languages, and for good reason. This article concentrates on the linguistic strategies of three multilingual individuals who moved across the North Sea: the nobleman Jan van der Noot, the painter Lucas d’Heere, and the merchant Johannes Radermacher. It studies the ways in which they used their proficiency in multiple languages as starting capital to build new social and professional lives for themselves. For example, they used their linguistic skills to appeal to the local aristocracy in order to ensure patronage, to expand social and professional networks by frequenting particular religious language communities, and to offer language instruction. This article therefore contributes to our understanding of linguistic encounters in the everyday lives and struggles of migrants in the sixteenth century.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Marie Levant; Philippe Bourmaud; Sanchez Summerer Karène; Norig Neveu; Séverine GABRY-THIENPONT;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: France, France, France, France, Netherlands

    International audience; How was missionary knowledge received and interpreted by scholars and church historians in Europe and Russia? Many late nineteenth and early twentieth-century academics utilised knowledge production from Christian missions, notably by way of scholarly Orientalism. However, the history of this knowledge is also a history of representations: while missionary knowledge helped showcase the cultural and religious traditions of Eastern Christianity, what were the underlying motives and especially the consequences? This article examines the formulation and circulation of Eastern Christian knowledge on either side of the Mediterranean, especially on the basis of Catholic missionary archives and academic productions, the study of which is sometimes rooted in non-Anglophone academic traditions. The aim is to shed light on how knowledge relating to Eastern Christianity was assimilated in Europe, as well as the role missions played in this process, especially from the last third of the nineteenth century, when the institutions and instruments for the circulation of knowledge emerged. Another objective is to address the circulations and transformations of this knowledge on either side of the Mediterranean: collected and developed in major European libraries and universities, it was integrated by the governance structures of churches, but quite often also returned to the space it originated from, where it was reappropriated and gave rise to patrimonial processes, notably alongside the sometimes tragic experiences of certain communities during the end of the Ottoman Empire and the establishment of new states. Christian missions, at the intersection of East and West, were at the heart of this dynamic .

  • Publication . Doctoral thesis . 2021
    Open Access English

    This dissertation explores the function of architecture in the illustrated manuscripts of the erudite Spanish Benedictine scholar, artist and preacher Juan Ricci de Guevara. Among architectural historians, Ricci has become famous for his invention of the complete architectural Salomonic order, which has been discussed by modern scholars predominantly isolated from its textual context, and from a formal, aesthetic approach. The new, comprehensive approach of Ricci’s scholarship in the manuscripts shows that he referred to architecture continuously. From this starting point the hypothesis is made that architecture for Ricci was a suitable interdisciplinary agent for his innovative ideas. With architecture, he could establish connections between various sources, methods and arguments, while coincidentally maintaining the scientific level of his scholarly work. This dissertation is the first book in which Ricci’s written oeuvre (which was never published and is now kept in Madrid, El Escorial, the Vatican and Montecassino) is assessed in-depth comprehensively. It results in a detailed insight in his formulation of a pivotal role for architecture and the architectural image in seventeenth-century scholarship, as a result of Ricci’s particular fusion of scholarly, artistic and rhetorical approaches. The recognition of this mechanism results in an updated inventory of his manuscripts, a discussion of important but hitherto unknown sections of the writings in which the position of architecture is discussed and legitimized, an adjustment of the modern formal discussion of the complete Salomonic order, a new analysis of Ricci’s presentation of his ideas to Pope Alexander VII in the 1660s, and the identification of a decoration program by Ricci for the basilica of the abbey of Montecassino.

  • Publication . Article . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lin, F.;
    Country: Netherlands
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Milan Mikolaj van Lange;
    Country: Netherlands

    That World War II is connected to emotions seems self-evident. But what did this relationship entail? Did it change over time? And how can we know such things? Milan van Lange’s PhD-thesis ‘Emotional Imprints: A Computer-assisted Analysis of War-related Emotions in Dutch Parliamentary Debates, 1945–1989’ offers a creative and innovative perspective on ‘things we think we know’ regarding emotions related to the aftermath of World War II in the Netherlands. ‘Emotional Imprints’ investigates the role of emotions in the post-war political engagement with the war’s consequences. By applying text mining to identify and quantify emotional expressions in thousands of digitised historical documents, Van Lange analyses not only whether emotions were present, but also how they were expressed in parliamentary debates on people who experienced the long-term effects of the war, such as former collaborators and war criminals, the anti-Nazi resistance, and various groups of war victims. Outcomes of this investigation show how emotions were never absent in the post-war sources analysed. The thesis provides an empirically supported farewell to received wisdoms about a ‘silent’ period in the 1950s, or a strong ‘emotionalisation’ in the 1970s. Rather than emotions making history themselves, politicians gave emotions a role in discussing contemporary matters. This role evolved from ‘descriptive’ to ‘appraising’ and ultimately ‘distant’ and ‘abstract’. The thesis displays how historical research can be enhanced by (re)sources, methods, and ideas from various fields, ranging from social psychology to computer linguistics. ‘Emotional Imprints’ makes an original contribution to methodological innovation highly relevant to historical research – especially in times of mass-digitisation and an increasing availability of digital-born sources.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Mario Damen; Kim Overlaet; Duncan Hardy; Luca Zenobi; Marcus Meer; Rombert Stapel; Robert Stein; Lisa Demets; Marianne Ritsema Van Eck; Arend Elias Oostindiër; +4 more
    Publisher: Amsterdam University Press
    Country: Netherlands

    In recent political and legal history, scholars seldom specify how and why they use the concept of territory. In research on state-formation processes and nation building, for instance, the term mostly designates an enclosed geographical area ruled by a central government. Inspired by ideas from political geographers, this book explores the layered and constantly changing meanings of territory in late medieval and early modern Europe before cartography and state formation turned boundaries and territories into more fixed (but still changeable) geographical entities. Its central thesis is that assessing the notion of territory in a pre-modern setting involves analysing territorial practices: practices that relate people and power to space(s). The essays in this book not only examine the construction and spatial structure of pre-modern territories but also explore their perception and representation through the use of a broad range of sources: from administrative texts to maps, from stained-glass windows to chronicles.