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  • Publication . Review . 2021
    Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Rattenborg, Rune;
    Publisher: Uppsala universitet, Institutionen för lingvistik och filologi
    Country: Sweden

    Titele in WoS: The metropolises of the Middle East

  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Pontus Rudberg;
    Publisher: Donner Institute
    Country: Sweden

    Slutreplik till Malin Thor Tureby om svensk-judisk historieforskning (se Vol. 31 nr 1 och 2).

  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Wienberg, Jes;
    Publisher: Jysk Arkæologisk Selskab
    Country: Sweden
  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Wienberg, Jes;
    Publisher: Jysk Arkæologisk Selskab
    Country: Sweden

    At the 100 years anniversary in 2020 of the Reunion around 650 memorials have been protected. The memorials are to be found all over Denmark, where they constitute the largest group. The time of their erection, the localization, design, inscriptions, pictures and initiators are relatively well known. The article investigates two main questions. Firstly, why have so many memorials for the Reunion been erected – the very first in 1919, by far most in 1920 and the years immediately afterwards and the last one as late as 2010? Has it been an expression of national joy, as it was been claimed the and even later until today, or might there be other explanations? Alternative perspectives are presented, which call into question both the Reunion as a concept and the joy. The memorials are interpreted as an effort to create a community of remembrance. The Reunion was highly disputed and a few of the memorials even express discontent. Thus, the memorials of the Reunion might also be interpreted as expression of a crisis. Secondly, the article looks into the present preservation of what might be called a modern heritage. There is nothing unique in protecting modern remains seen in a global perspective. The memorials had in many cases become “invisible”, e.g. neglected or forgotten. Some had been moved and others had disappeared. The protection was also motivated with reference to their unique Danish character, being evidence of local urge and sense of community. Still, I wonder if also the present, just as the age of the Reunion, is a period of crisis in need of an anniversary and acts of protection to divert attention.Added to the article is an appendix with a catalogue of 642 known memorials of the Reunion 1919–2020 presented by the year of erection and/ or inauguration. And the article is illustrated with five figures showings examples of memorials: The memorial column at Skamlingsbanken built in 1863 and blown up in 1864, not being a memorial of the Reunion, but an example of the harsh treatment of memorials in the borderland between Denmark and Germany (fig. 1); the very first memorial of the Reunion built in Tarm in 1919 (fig. 2); a memorial at the location where the king Christian X started his ride over the old border (fig. 3); a memorial erected in 2020 at the church of Rømø (fig. 4); and finally, the Reunion Tower at Ejer Bavnehøj built in 1924 (fig 5).

  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Håkan Bengtsson;
    Publisher: Donner Institute
    Country: Sweden

    This article addresses the issue of teaching Judaism for students in the teacher-trainingprogramme and those training to become clergy in a Swedish milieu. A major challenge in thesecular post-Protestant setting is to pinpoint and challenge the negative presuppositions of Judaismas a religion of legalism, whereas the student’s own assumption is that she or he is neutral. Even ifthe older paradigms of anti-Jewish stereotypes are somewhat distant, there are further patterns ofthought which depict Judaism as a ‘strange’ and ‘legalistic’ religion. Students in the teacher-trainingprogramme for teaching religion in schools can in class react negatively to concepts like kosherslaughter, circumcision and the Shabbat lift. Even if the explanatory motives vary, there is nonethelessa tendency common to ordination students, relating to a Protestant notion of the Jewish Torah,commonly rendered as ‘Law’ or ‘legalism’. This notion of ‘the Law’ as a means of self-redemptioncan, it is argued in the article, be discerned specially among clergy students reading Pauline textsand theology. This analysis shows that both teacher-training and textbooks need to be updated inaccordance with modern research in order to refute older anti-Jewish patterns of thought. As forthe challenge posed by the simplistic labelling of both Judaism and Islam as religions of law, theimplementation of the teaching guidelines concerning everyday ‘lived religion’ enables and allowsthe teacher to better disclose Judaism, Christianity and Islam as piously organised living faiths ratherthan as being ruled by legalistic principles. Title in WoS: Didactic reflections on Judaism, stereotypes and thought figures

  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Lauland, Peter;
    Publisher: Umeå universitet, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier
    Country: Sweden
  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Wienberg, Jes;
    Publisher: Jysk Arkæologisk Selskab
    Country: Sweden
  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Frydendahl Larsen, Bolette;
    Publisher: Department of History, Lund university
    Country: Sweden

    Between 1908 and 1940, 431 young girls between 16 and 21 years of age were enrolled at Vejstrup Re-education Home for Girls. Through close readings of individual case records and other archival material from Vejstrup Re-education Home, this PhD thesis explores the ways in which the so-called “particularly difficult young girls” were perceived as problematic and how they were handled from 1908 to 1940. The thesis uncovers how the problematisation and handling of the girls changed as psychiatric knowledge was integrated into the field. The thesis is informed by Michel Foucault’s perspective on power and knowledge as mutually constitutive and on power as a productive force that transforms human beings into (specific kinds of) subjects. Introducing the concept of motherly caring power, the reform practices at Vejstrup Re-Education Home are analysed as a specific type of disciplinary liberal government directed at the individual’s will and emotions. The central technique used to re-educate the young girls was the relationship between the headmistress and each individual girl. The aim of re-education was ultimately to lead the girls to regulate themselves to become ‘good girls' and ultimately to strive for becoming servants and wives.The perception of child welfare was that every child could be re-educated, however 4.2% of the children and youth released from Danish residential care between 1905-1940 and 11.4% of the young girls released from Vejstrup Re-Education Home in the same period were released because they had been deemed incorrigible. The expulsions on the grounds of incorrigibility, led to a new problematisation and category that also comprised a new subject: The Incorrigible. During the 1920s, doctors became increasingly involved in assessing the nature of the girls at Vejstrup Re-Education Home, as well as in evaluating how they should be handled. The analysis shows that diagnoses, particularly the diagnosis psychopathy, grew intertwined with the existing category of incorrigibility. The reformulation of incorrigibility to psychopathy and other diagnoses was relevant, because the diagnoses entailed new ways of handling, as well as the anticipation of additional resources. In the 1920s the headmistress attempted to gain ressources for a closed ward at the institution, but did not succeed. In 1930 the subsequent headmistress initiated lobbying for the establishment of a psychopathic institution for girls in 1930. Though she did not succeed, doctors and politicians supported the idea, and a commission was formed to prepare a proposal for the establishment of a psychopathic institution. The thesis uncovers how the problematisation of so-called incorrigible girls as psychopaths emerged at Vejstrup Re-Education Home. Thus the thesis shows how child psychiatry was shaped and practiced within child welfare before the opening of the first Danish child psychiatric clinic in 1935 and before the 1958 establishment of a pedagogic committee in child welfare, incorporating e.g. professional knowledge from psychiatry and psychology.

  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Johan Prytz;
    Publisher: Umeå University
    Country: Sweden

    This article examines the design of the mathematics curriculum applied in Sweden between 1980 and 1995 and how this design affected student results between two international tests, SIMS1980 and TIMSS1995. During this period, the results in mathematics improved on a general level, but in some topics it did not. The results increased significantly in arithmetic, but very little in algebra. I investigate in what respect the arithmetic and algebra curricula were designed differently. The analysed materials are syllabus, commentary material, tests, and textbooks. The analysis is based on Bernstein’s theory on classification and framing. The main conclusion is that strong framing in the curriculum can be associated with better student results in TIMSS and evidence for a causal relation between these entities is presented. On the basis of my finding, I raise a critical question about the change in governing policy that took place in Sweden between 1975 and 2000.

  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Malin Thor Tureby;
    Publisher: Donner Institute
    Country: Sweden

    In a Swedish context, Jewish women’s experiences and actions have gone unrecorded and unrecognised; most narratives of Swedish Jewish history offer only a partial account of their past. Marginalised or ignored, or absorbed into universalised categories of ‘Jews’, ‘women’ or ‘survivors’, the experiences and histories of Jewish women are in general not represented in previous Swedish research on the history of the Jewish minority, the Swedish Jewish response to the Nazi terror and the Holocaust or the history of the women’s movement in general. Previous research on the Swedish Jewish response and assistance for the Jewish refugees and survivors of Nazi persecution has mainly dealt with the Jewish community in Stockholm and its relief committee, where the women were absent from leadership positions. The purpose of this study is to explore if and how the Jewish women’s club in Stockholm initiated or was involved in relief activities for and with the persecuted Jews of Europe. Specifically, this is investigated in the context of how the club was established and manifested in public by examining what questions the club raised and what activities it organised in the 1930s and 1940s.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
22 Research products, page 1 of 3
  • Publication . Review . 2021
    Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Rattenborg, Rune;
    Publisher: Uppsala universitet, Institutionen för lingvistik och filologi
    Country: Sweden

    Titele in WoS: The metropolises of the Middle East

  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Pontus Rudberg;
    Publisher: Donner Institute
    Country: Sweden

    Slutreplik till Malin Thor Tureby om svensk-judisk historieforskning (se Vol. 31 nr 1 och 2).

  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Wienberg, Jes;
    Publisher: Jysk Arkæologisk Selskab
    Country: Sweden
  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Wienberg, Jes;
    Publisher: Jysk Arkæologisk Selskab
    Country: Sweden

    At the 100 years anniversary in 2020 of the Reunion around 650 memorials have been protected. The memorials are to be found all over Denmark, where they constitute the largest group. The time of their erection, the localization, design, inscriptions, pictures and initiators are relatively well known. The article investigates two main questions. Firstly, why have so many memorials for the Reunion been erected – the very first in 1919, by far most in 1920 and the years immediately afterwards and the last one as late as 2010? Has it been an expression of national joy, as it was been claimed the and even later until today, or might there be other explanations? Alternative perspectives are presented, which call into question both the Reunion as a concept and the joy. The memorials are interpreted as an effort to create a community of remembrance. The Reunion was highly disputed and a few of the memorials even express discontent. Thus, the memorials of the Reunion might also be interpreted as expression of a crisis. Secondly, the article looks into the present preservation of what might be called a modern heritage. There is nothing unique in protecting modern remains seen in a global perspective. The memorials had in many cases become “invisible”, e.g. neglected or forgotten. Some had been moved and others had disappeared. The protection was also motivated with reference to their unique Danish character, being evidence of local urge and sense of community. Still, I wonder if also the present, just as the age of the Reunion, is a period of crisis in need of an anniversary and acts of protection to divert attention.Added to the article is an appendix with a catalogue of 642 known memorials of the Reunion 1919–2020 presented by the year of erection and/ or inauguration. And the article is illustrated with five figures showings examples of memorials: The memorial column at Skamlingsbanken built in 1863 and blown up in 1864, not being a memorial of the Reunion, but an example of the harsh treatment of memorials in the borderland between Denmark and Germany (fig. 1); the very first memorial of the Reunion built in Tarm in 1919 (fig. 2); a memorial at the location where the king Christian X started his ride over the old border (fig. 3); a memorial erected in 2020 at the church of Rømø (fig. 4); and finally, the Reunion Tower at Ejer Bavnehøj built in 1924 (fig 5).

  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Håkan Bengtsson;
    Publisher: Donner Institute
    Country: Sweden

    This article addresses the issue of teaching Judaism for students in the teacher-trainingprogramme and those training to become clergy in a Swedish milieu. A major challenge in thesecular post-Protestant setting is to pinpoint and challenge the negative presuppositions of Judaismas a religion of legalism, whereas the student’s own assumption is that she or he is neutral. Even ifthe older paradigms of anti-Jewish stereotypes are somewhat distant, there are further patterns ofthought which depict Judaism as a ‘strange’ and ‘legalistic’ religion. Students in the teacher-trainingprogramme for teaching religion in schools can in class react negatively to concepts like kosherslaughter, circumcision and the Shabbat lift. Even if the explanatory motives vary, there is nonethelessa tendency common to ordination students, relating to a Protestant notion of the Jewish Torah,commonly rendered as ‘Law’ or ‘legalism’. This notion of ‘the Law’ as a means of self-redemptioncan, it is argued in the article, be discerned specially among clergy students reading Pauline textsand theology. This analysis shows that both teacher-training and textbooks need to be updated inaccordance with modern research in order to refute older anti-Jewish patterns of thought. As forthe challenge posed by the simplistic labelling of both Judaism and Islam as religions of law, theimplementation of the teaching guidelines concerning everyday ‘lived religion’ enables and allowsthe teacher to better disclose Judaism, Christianity and Islam as piously organised living faiths ratherthan as being ruled by legalistic principles. Title in WoS: Didactic reflections on Judaism, stereotypes and thought figures

  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Lauland, Peter;
    Publisher: Umeå universitet, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier
    Country: Sweden
  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Wienberg, Jes;
    Publisher: Jysk Arkæologisk Selskab
    Country: Sweden
  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Frydendahl Larsen, Bolette;
    Publisher: Department of History, Lund university
    Country: Sweden

    Between 1908 and 1940, 431 young girls between 16 and 21 years of age were enrolled at Vejstrup Re-education Home for Girls. Through close readings of individual case records and other archival material from Vejstrup Re-education Home, this PhD thesis explores the ways in which the so-called “particularly difficult young girls” were perceived as problematic and how they were handled from 1908 to 1940. The thesis uncovers how the problematisation and handling of the girls changed as psychiatric knowledge was integrated into the field. The thesis is informed by Michel Foucault’s perspective on power and knowledge as mutually constitutive and on power as a productive force that transforms human beings into (specific kinds of) subjects. Introducing the concept of motherly caring power, the reform practices at Vejstrup Re-Education Home are analysed as a specific type of disciplinary liberal government directed at the individual’s will and emotions. The central technique used to re-educate the young girls was the relationship between the headmistress and each individual girl. The aim of re-education was ultimately to lead the girls to regulate themselves to become ‘good girls' and ultimately to strive for becoming servants and wives.The perception of child welfare was that every child could be re-educated, however 4.2% of the children and youth released from Danish residential care between 1905-1940 and 11.4% of the young girls released from Vejstrup Re-Education Home in the same period were released because they had been deemed incorrigible. The expulsions on the grounds of incorrigibility, led to a new problematisation and category that also comprised a new subject: The Incorrigible. During the 1920s, doctors became increasingly involved in assessing the nature of the girls at Vejstrup Re-Education Home, as well as in evaluating how they should be handled. The analysis shows that diagnoses, particularly the diagnosis psychopathy, grew intertwined with the existing category of incorrigibility. The reformulation of incorrigibility to psychopathy and other diagnoses was relevant, because the diagnoses entailed new ways of handling, as well as the anticipation of additional resources. In the 1920s the headmistress attempted to gain ressources for a closed ward at the institution, but did not succeed. In 1930 the subsequent headmistress initiated lobbying for the establishment of a psychopathic institution for girls in 1930. Though she did not succeed, doctors and politicians supported the idea, and a commission was formed to prepare a proposal for the establishment of a psychopathic institution. The thesis uncovers how the problematisation of so-called incorrigible girls as psychopaths emerged at Vejstrup Re-Education Home. Thus the thesis shows how child psychiatry was shaped and practiced within child welfare before the opening of the first Danish child psychiatric clinic in 1935 and before the 1958 establishment of a pedagogic committee in child welfare, incorporating e.g. professional knowledge from psychiatry and psychology.

  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Johan Prytz;
    Publisher: Umeå University
    Country: Sweden

    This article examines the design of the mathematics curriculum applied in Sweden between 1980 and 1995 and how this design affected student results between two international tests, SIMS1980 and TIMSS1995. During this period, the results in mathematics improved on a general level, but in some topics it did not. The results increased significantly in arithmetic, but very little in algebra. I investigate in what respect the arithmetic and algebra curricula were designed differently. The analysed materials are syllabus, commentary material, tests, and textbooks. The analysis is based on Bernstein’s theory on classification and framing. The main conclusion is that strong framing in the curriculum can be associated with better student results in TIMSS and evidence for a causal relation between these entities is presented. On the basis of my finding, I raise a critical question about the change in governing policy that took place in Sweden between 1975 and 2000.

  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Malin Thor Tureby;
    Publisher: Donner Institute
    Country: Sweden

    In a Swedish context, Jewish women’s experiences and actions have gone unrecorded and unrecognised; most narratives of Swedish Jewish history offer only a partial account of their past. Marginalised or ignored, or absorbed into universalised categories of ‘Jews’, ‘women’ or ‘survivors’, the experiences and histories of Jewish women are in general not represented in previous Swedish research on the history of the Jewish minority, the Swedish Jewish response to the Nazi terror and the Holocaust or the history of the women’s movement in general. Previous research on the Swedish Jewish response and assistance for the Jewish refugees and survivors of Nazi persecution has mainly dealt with the Jewish community in Stockholm and its relief committee, where the women were absent from leadership positions. The purpose of this study is to explore if and how the Jewish women’s club in Stockholm initiated or was involved in relief activities for and with the persecuted Jews of Europe. Specifically, this is investigated in the context of how the club was established and manifested in public by examining what questions the club raised and what activities it organised in the 1930s and 1940s.