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19 Research products, page 1 of 2

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
  • Publications
  • 2013-2022
  • Open Access
  • Article
  • Danish
  • Publikationer från Umeå universitet
  • Lund University Publications

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  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Wienberg, Jes;
    Publisher: Jysk Arkæologisk Selskab
    Country: Sweden

    At the 100 years anniversary in 2020 of the Reunion around 650 memorials have been protected. The memorials are to be found all over Denmark, where they constitute the largest group. The time of their erection, the localization, design, inscriptions, pictures and initiators are relatively well known. The article investigates two main questions. Firstly, why have so many memorials for the Reunion been erected – the very first in 1919, by far most in 1920 and the years immediately afterwards and the last one as late as 2010? Has it been an expression of national joy, as it was been claimed the and even later until today, or might there be other explanations? Alternative perspectives are presented, which call into question both the Reunion as a concept and the joy. The memorials are interpreted as an effort to create a community of remembrance. The Reunion was highly disputed and a few of the memorials even express discontent. Thus, the memorials of the Reunion might also be interpreted as expression of a crisis. Secondly, the article looks into the present preservation of what might be called a modern heritage. There is nothing unique in protecting modern remains seen in a global perspective. The memorials had in many cases become “invisible”, e.g. neglected or forgotten. Some had been moved and others had disappeared. The protection was also motivated with reference to their unique Danish character, being evidence of local urge and sense of community. Still, I wonder if also the present, just as the age of the Reunion, is a period of crisis in need of an anniversary and acts of protection to divert attention.Added to the article is an appendix with a catalogue of 642 known memorials of the Reunion 1919–2020 presented by the year of erection and/ or inauguration. And the article is illustrated with five figures showings examples of memorials: The memorial column at Skamlingsbanken built in 1863 and blown up in 1864, not being a memorial of the Reunion, but an example of the harsh treatment of memorials in the borderland between Denmark and Germany (fig. 1); the very first memorial of the Reunion built in Tarm in 1919 (fig. 2); a memorial at the location where the king Christian X started his ride over the old border (fig. 3); a memorial erected in 2020 at the church of Rømø (fig. 4); and finally, the Reunion Tower at Ejer Bavnehøj built in 1924 (fig 5).

  • Publication . Article . 2019
    Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Henrik Åström Elmersjö;
    Publisher: Umeå University
    Country: Sweden
  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Cecilie Boge; Anna Larsson;
    Publisher: Umeå University
    Countries: Sweden, Norway

    Around 1970, violence among pupils became conceptualised in a radically new way when the concept of “mobbing” was introduced into the Nordic school debate. The concept was immediately embraced by popular discourse with the result that significant attention and discussion followed. It was also soon picked up by researchers and became further developed within Swedish and Norwegian behavioural science. This article concerns how pupil violence in the form of bullying was understood and theorised in the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s in Sweden and Norway. It shows how certain political and intellectual conditions, and events, in both national contexts were decisive for the development of bullying theory, eventually leading up to a commercialisation of bullying theory. This development is discussed with the help of the concept “psychology-commercial complex,” derived from Pickstone’s theory of technoscience. publishedVersion

  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Tobias Karlsson; Fay Lundh Nilsson; Anders Nilsson;
    Publisher: Umeå University
    Country: Sweden

    In this article we discuss vocational education in Sweden against the backdrop of the changing nature of industrial relations in the period from ca 1910 to 1975. Drawing upon evidence from official inquiries and case studies of two industries (forest industry and shipbuilding), we show that Sweden in the 1940s and 1950s can be described as a collective skill formation system in the making, where firms, intermediary associations, and the state cooperated around vocational education and training. However, Sweden developed in a very different direction than similar countries. We argue that this remarkable change of trajectory cannot be understood without considering the simultaneous disintegration of the model of industrial relations, along with general changes in the system of education.

  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Björn Norlin;
    Publisher: Umeå University
    Country: Sweden
  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Björn Furuhagen; Janne Holmén;
    Publisher: Umeå University
    Country: Sweden

    In the 1970s, Sweden and Finland abandoned the system of seminars for folk school teachers and incorporated all teacher education into the system of higher education. The visions behind the new education, as well as the original plans for its structure, were similar in both countries, but the outcomes were different. Finland managed to a greater extent to implement an academic teacher education located at universities, while the Swedish solution was deemed unsatisfactory by many actors, leading to several new reforms in the following decades. This can be explained by the different nature of the conflicts surrounding the reforms in Sweden and Finland. In Finland, the early 1970s was a period of intense left-right polarisation, followed by attempts to depoliticise teacher education. In Sweden, the vision of an academic teacher education met successful resistance from regional actors, resulting in the preservation of much of the old seminar system under the guise of small teacher education colleges.

  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Karl Bruno;
    Publisher: Umeå University
    Country: Sweden

    Silvi-Cultural Encounters: The Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences and Higher Forestry Education in Ethiopia, 1986–2009The article discusses the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences’ support to higher forestry education in Ethiopia, which took place between 1986 and 2009 in the context of Swedish-Ethiopian development cooperation. Against a growing historical interest in transnational encounters within the field of education, it analyses how Swedish forestry experts designed educational programs and taught in new environments. The concept of “silvi-culture” is introduced to signify that the tensions that arose within this aid effort related both to the technicalities of forestry education and to diverging academic and social cultures. The article is structured around three kinds of “silvi-cultural encounters” that describe the development of the project both chronologically and thematically. These encounters are used to demonstrate how the forest as a concrete, physical place was of central importance to the Swedish experts, as well as to show how they were guided by preconceptions developed within the framework of a Swedish silvi-culture that was only partially compatible with the conditions in Ethiopia.

  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    David Willgren;
    Publisher: Ansgar Teologiske Høgskole, Örebro Teologiska Högskola, Høyskolen for Ledelse og Teologi
    Country: Sweden

    The article argues that the way Anabaptist history and theology is commonly narrated needs to be reshaped. A fundamental question is asked: Did women have positions of power in the early Anabaptist movement? Two points are considered: 1) How is power understood? and 2) On what premises can the history of Anabaptist women be written? These two points are put in relation to portraits of three women – Margret Hottinger, Helene von Freyberg, and Elisabeth Dirks – who represent three fundamental ways in which women related to power and authority in the early years of the movement. The article concludes that the way the stories of early Anabaptist women have usually been told are often both highly tendentious and failing to assess the authority of women on the basis of an Anabaptist theology of power. At the same time, the early movement employed a flat biblical hermeneutic that lead to a failure to process the subversive use of power and authority and the theological potential of the Anabaptist critique of the sword in relation to their own families and communities.

  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Christian Lundahl;
    Publisher: Umeå University
    Country: Sweden

    For many historians of education, the emergence of a modern education system after the mid-nineteenth century was a national and regional process, neatly and carefully closed off within the borders of the nation. However, these accounts have often disregarded the effects of the flows of cross-border ideas and technologies, such as international comparisons, lesson-drawing, policy diffusion and travel, as well as local adaptations and translations of education policy originating elsewhere. The purpose of this article is to shed light on the relations between Swedish education and the international scene when it comes to policy and practice formation. The field of study is the international World´s Fairs of 1862–1904. Looking at what Sweden displayed, and understanding how visitors perceived it, the article raises questions concerning how exhibitions like these worked as mediators of educational ideals. The focus will be on the dissemination of aesthetic ideals, and the article will show that the World’s Fairs were platforms for an aesthetic normativity that had governing effects locally as well as globally.

  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Sandra Hellstrand;
    Publisher: Umeå University
    Country: Sweden

    Sweden never got an apprentice law after apprenticeship was de-regulated in 1864. This has been attributed to unified opposition to legislation from industry employers and trade unions, with the craft employers as the only advocates. Analysing the pattern of agreement and disagreement in the political struggle over apprenticeship in the Swedish case in 1890–1917, it is clear that opposition was not that uniform, nor was the support from the craft employers that undivided. This article makes use of Kathleen Thelen’s model of institutional change in order to shed new light on the developments in Sweden. The model states that any apprentice law requires a coalition of two or more out of the state, the crafts and the metalworking industries – divided into employers and workers. Legislation, in turn, is a near requirement for the survival of strong apprenticeship. In this article the Swedish case will be discussed in relation to two of Thelen’s cases, Germany and Great Britain. In Germany an apprentice law was passed in 1897, while in Great Britain no modern apprentice law was ever passed. Similarities can be found between both of these cases and the Swedish case.