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46 Research products, page 1 of 5

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
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  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Barth, Theodor;
    Publisher: KMD
    Country: Norway

    Research portfolio THE PROBLEM: The collection of items available as uploads (left) are broadly concerned with a class of rhythmic events that that contain disturbing elements, or “hiccups”. Example: Firstly, secondly, weirdly and thirdly… Hiccups can occur in sequences that are either logical, procedural or both (editorial). They are e.g. relevant in connection with photogravure editions. Featuring elements that are unexplainable/irrelevant in the sequence. 1, 2, X and 3… (See Didi-Huberman for an in depth analysis of the question. Didi-Huberman, Georges. (2008). La ressemblance par contact—Archaeologie et modernité de l’empreinte. Minuit.) I am broadly scouting for ways of taking stock such odd elements to see if it is possible to intercept the weft of the passage from image- to object perception. This is done by asking a question, showing an image, and providing an answer. The images are the ones contained in the slide-show (featuring the Q&A at the end). Together, the sequence of 26 Q&As with an image, feature a matrix of the type that Christopher Alexander called a pattern (with the interception X added here). The argument for making an account and finding uses for hiccups is: if unattended they leave a long tail, a growing shadow discussed here in Goethe’s and Jung’s terms. If hiccups are understood as elements occurring in a sequence/edition for which there is no rule, nor any currently existing learning algorithm, then they will tend to aggregate. If left unaccounted and unattended they will grow on par with the power and multiplication of computers in human exchange (i.e., a long entropic tail). Hence we here have a candidate model to explain how human and environmental relations could escalate to states of exception in a variety of un/related areas. And alternatives of how to deal with them are within reach of research. A solution that eliminates the problem—or, an answer that eliminates the question—contains no knowledge. SYNOPSIS From the exhibition element shown in Gallery ROM61 at KMD, for the seminar Tracing Rhythm, a carousel of slides were slung in a spiral out of the Lineup called La Kahina. Her journey around the world as the wife of a diplomat called K, features a variety of homes: domestic interiors adapted to a variety of local circumstances and the job. On the backdrop of this adaptive enclosure the life and work of her husband: the Norwegian political positions in the global oil and gas-trade. Between them a middle zone dedicated to mundane and cultural events: La Kahina’s home is never quite private, and K’s diplomatic errands are never quite public. The middle zone is fringe-space between the private and public domains. It is compared with Goethe’s studio and Arne Næss cabin at Tvergastein (Hallingskarvet). From this an idea of a proximal space—smaller than the world but wider than the body—is connected to the come-and-go between studio-work and fieldwork. In this setting, three art works are compared in terms of how they differently combine field- and studio-work: William Kentridge, Geir Harald Samuelsen, Dragoş Gheorghiu. It is suggested that the vectorial sum of field- and studio-work are organised according to 3 material tropes (Karen Barad): entanglement, superposition and intra-action. From this it is further anticipated that complex phenomena will be composite in terms of these 3 tropes. Providing a ground work for understanding current critical turns. The two chief conversation partners are here Bruno Latour’s titles: Down to Earth (2018) and After lockdown (2021). The idea of the long-tail model above came from there. The essay (attached) was written in preparation to the seminar Tracing Rhythm to reach a ground zero from where the images could be at the forefront. The result was a hiccup: that is, it produced a phenomenological equivalent—or, the event—of Shannon’s definition of information as entropy. On account of the multiplication of images perceived owing to the many instrumental shifts in the production of a photogravure, the techniques becomes an experimental laboratory to explore image collapse into object perception. The Kahina lineup attempts to transpose the production of this transition into an exhibition space, in making the image to object perception available to the viewer in the form of a debatable proposition. However, the photogravure process also features an artistic proposition (exposition) as an active model of similar types of problem (outlined above): notably types of processes where object perception is indeterminately anticipated and proposed. Calling on a hammerbolt, or featuring a counter-beat. As an entry/exit device in working with diary materials—as is the case in the National Library residency in which the project is currently hatching—photgravure has a similar function as the wind-rose on maps. One that steers towards the hatching of an object. Most probably a book. The hosting PKU project—Matter Gesture and Soul—is one of the unique arenas where academic pursuits and research can combine with workshop premises of the art field. Matter Gesture and Soul (DIKU/KMD)

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Zubiaurre, Elena; Bele, Bolette; Simon, Veronique Karine; Reher, Guillermo S.; Rodríguez, Ana Delia; Alonso, Rodrigo; Castiglioni, Benedetta;

    The Faro Convention underlined the importance of educational initiatives related to heritage. This paper focuses on the educational dimension of landscape, as a means to better facilitate its social acceptance and hence its inclusion in planning and management processes. The relation between landscape education and social perception, through a few European examples will be analysed to ascertain whether the principles of the Convention are being complied with effectively. The authors introduce four case studies of heritage-related education carried out in three European countries (Spain, Norway and Italy). These case studies provide the possibility to coherently analyse a wide range of activities and initiatives occurring at various scales and levels: geographic, local and sectoral. In addition, they describe the pedagogical potential of cultural landscapes and cultural heritage, and highlight some of the educational strategies and measures currently used in this field.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    García-Díaz, José Antonio; Colomo-Palacios, Ricardo; Valencia-Garcia, Rafael;
    Publisher: Elsevier

    In general, people are usually more reluctant to follow advice and directions from politicians who do not have their ideology. In extreme cases, people can be heavily biased in favour of a political party at the same time that they are in sharp disagreement with others, which may lead to irrational decision making and can put people’s lives at risk by ignoring certain recommendations from the authorities. Therefore, considering political ideology as a psychographic trait can improve political micro-targeting by helping public authorities and local governments to adopt better communication policies during crises. In this work, we explore the reliability of determining psychographic traits concerning political ideology. Our contribution is twofold. On the one hand, we release the PoliCorpus-2020, a dataset composed by Spanish politicians’ tweets posted in 2020. On the other hand, we conduct two authorship analysis tasks with the aforementioned dataset: an author profiling task to extract demographic and psychographic traits, and an authorship attribution task to determine the author of an anonymous text in the political domain. Both experiments are evaluated with several neural network architectures grounded on explainable linguistic features, statistical features, and state-of-the-art transformers. In addition, we test whether the neural network models can be transferred to detect the political ideology of citizens. Our results indicate that the linguistic features are good indicators for identifying finegrained political affiliation, they boost the performance of neural network models when combined with embedding-based features, and they preserve relevant information when the models are tested with ordinary citizens. Besides, we found that lexical and morphosyntactic features are more effective on author profiling, whereas stylometric features are more effective in authorship attribution.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Von Essen, Erica; Van der Wal, René; Turnbull, Jonathon; Searle, Adam; Hofmeester, Tim R.;

    Digital surveillance technologies enable a range of publics to observe the private lives of wild animals. Publics can now encounter wildlife from their smartphones, home computers, and other digital devices. These technologies generate public-wildlife relations that produce digital intimacy, but also summon wildlife into relations of care, commodification, and control. Via three case studies, this paper examines the biopolitical implications of such technologically mediated human-animal relations, which are becoming increasingly common and complex in the Digital Anthropocene. Each of our case studies involves a different biopolitical rationale deployed by a scientific-managerial regime: (1) clampdown (wild boar); (2) care (golden eagle); and (3) control (moose). Each of these modalities of biopower, however, is entangled with the other, inaugurating complex relations between publics, scientists, and wildlife. We show how digital technologies can predetermine certain representations of wildlife by encouraging particular gazes, which can have negative repercussions for public-wildlife relations in both digital and offline spaces. However, there remains work to be done to understand the positive public-wildlife relations inaugurated by digital mediation. Here, departing from much extant literature on digital human-animal relations, we highlight some of these positive potentials, notably: voice, immediacy, and agency.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kristoffersen, Martin; Log, Torgrim;
    Publisher: Elsevier

    There is a genuine will to protect Nordic wooden towns in Norway, as they are considered national heritage and an important part of the urban identity. The fire protection of wooden heritage towns is an ongoing cooperation between private owners, who are required to keep their property up to codes, and the authorities who works to limit the residual conflagration risk. The present study systemizes national fire protection initiatives and present successes and challenges. Research literature, legal framework, and municipality fire safety site plans were analyzed. Personnel from involved municipalities, fire services and national directorates were interviewed. Compared to other countries, Norway has indeed come a long way regarding practical fire mitigating measures. In year 2000, the first fire safety plans dedicated to protecting wooden towns were developed. In 2014, 25% of the wooden towns had fire safety plans, and in 2020, 60%. Status as national heritage and thus, financial support from the Directorate of Cultural Heritage, was the most important success factor. Measures were often not evaluated prior to implementation, partly due to lack of horizontal knowledge sharing between the municipalities involved. Important lessons have thus been gained separately, and not shared. Smoke detection alarming the fire brigades directly is documented to have prevented major heritage losses. The most common firefighting challenges were related to locating and accessing fires in cavities. Through clearer wording in regulations, and better knowledge sharing, fire protection could be improved with limited additional costs.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sætra, Henrik Skaug; Danaher, John;
    Publisher: Springer

    Ethics plays a key role in the normative analysis of the impacts of technology. We know that computers in general and the processing of data, the use of artificial intelligence, and the combination of computers and/or artificial intelligence with robotics are all associated with ethically relevant implications for individuals, groups, and society. In this article, we argue that while all technologies are ethically relevant, there is no need to create a separate ‘ethics of X’ or ‘X ethics’ for each and every subtype of technology or technological property—e.g. computer ethics, AI ethics, data ethics, information ethics, robot ethics, and machine ethics. Specific technologies might have specific impacts, but we argue that they are often sufficiently covered and understood through already established higher-level domains of ethics. Furthermore, the proliferation of tech ethics is problematic because (a) the conceptual boundaries between the subfields are not well-defined, (b) it leads to a duplication of effort and constant reinventing the wheel, and (c) there is danger that participants overlook or ignore more fundamental ethical insights and truths. The key to avoiding such outcomes lies in a taking the discipline of ethics seriously, and we consequently begin with a brief description of what ethics is, before presenting the main forms of technology related ethics. Through this process, we develop a hierarchy of technology ethics, which can be used by developers and engineers, researchers, or regulators who seek an understanding of the ethical implications of technology. We close by deducing two principles for positioning ethical analysis which will, in combination with the hierarchy, promote the leveraging of existing knowledge and help us to avoid an exaggerated proliferation of tech ethics.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jafri, Maryam;
    Publisher: Kunsthøgskolen i Oslo
    Country: Norway

    Fotodokumentasjon An inquiry into the limits of using images by and of other people in today’s networked, socially-mediated landscape. The project aims to situate contemporary image culture at the intersection of art, law and ethics. The point of departure is a real life incident in which the artist was accused of violating the privacy of an individual imaged in a video that was on display in her recent exhibition.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kotsadam, Andreas; Lind, Jo Thori; Modalsli, Jørgen;
    Publisher: Springer

    At the turn of the twentieth century, Norway, like many other countries, experienced a decrease in mortality and a substantial increase in the number of health personnel. In order to assess how these changes were connected, we investigate the relationship between health personnel and mortality using data at the medical district level (N=106) covering a period of 34 years. We find a large and robust effect of midwives on reduced maternal mortality in rural areas, but no effect in urban areas. No clear effect is found for other types of health personnel or on infant mortality. The results demonstrate the important role played by public health investments during the period.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nicu, Ionut Cristi; Lombardo, Luigi; Rubensdotter, Brita Lena Eleonor Fredin;

    Permafrost-dependent landslides occur in a range of sizes and are among the most dynamic landforms in the Arctic in the warming climate. Retrogressive thaw slumps (RTSs) are enlarging landslides triggered by thawing and release of excess water from permafrost ground ice, causing smaller or larger collapses of ground surface, which in turn exposes new permafrost to rapid thawing and collapse. In this study, a preliminary assessment of previous thaw slump activity in Nordenskiöld Land area of Svalbard is made based on remote sensing digitisation of 400 slump-scar features from aerial images from the Norwegian Polar Institute (NPI). RTS properties and distribution are analysed with an emphasis on their implications for the preservation of the Svalbard’s cultural heritage (CH). Our analysis shows that the areas where RTS scars and CH co-exist in Nordenskiöld Land are, at present, limited and cover mainly areas distributed along north-west (Colesbukta, Grønfjorden, Kapp Starostin), north-east (Sassendalen and Sassenfjorden) and south-west (Van Muydenbukta) coastlines. Taking into consideration the preliminary aspect of this inventory and study, it can be stated that for now, RTS and CH sites do not have a high level of co-existence, except for eight sites which are located at less than 100 m to a RTS and one site that is located inside a currently inactive slump-scar. Further mapping of RTS will be undertaken in order to have a complete picture of these climate triggered landslides potentially threatening the Arctic CH. The results of this study, even if preliminary, can be used by local authorities and stakeholders in prioritising future documentation and mitigation measures and can thus present a powerful tool in disaster risk reduction.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Barth, Theodor;
    Publisher: KHiO

    The flyer-series (dataset 1HEX) departs from the existence of mathematics in literary prose—for public exposés—in the Romantic era. And from here pursues the gross-fertilisation of group-theory in art and science. Featuring the idea of disordered systems (that comes from structural geology) and the keeping of logbooks in field studies. The flyer-set uses the same knowledge basis as Rosalind Krauss in the essay Sculpture in the Expanded Field, i.a. an article on structure in mathematics by Marc Barbut in Les Temps Modernes. The argument is merological: i.e., how we can study part-whole relations in terms of restricted, principal and expanded sets.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
46 Research products, page 1 of 5
  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Barth, Theodor;
    Publisher: KMD
    Country: Norway

    Research portfolio THE PROBLEM: The collection of items available as uploads (left) are broadly concerned with a class of rhythmic events that that contain disturbing elements, or “hiccups”. Example: Firstly, secondly, weirdly and thirdly… Hiccups can occur in sequences that are either logical, procedural or both (editorial). They are e.g. relevant in connection with photogravure editions. Featuring elements that are unexplainable/irrelevant in the sequence. 1, 2, X and 3… (See Didi-Huberman for an in depth analysis of the question. Didi-Huberman, Georges. (2008). La ressemblance par contact—Archaeologie et modernité de l’empreinte. Minuit.) I am broadly scouting for ways of taking stock such odd elements to see if it is possible to intercept the weft of the passage from image- to object perception. This is done by asking a question, showing an image, and providing an answer. The images are the ones contained in the slide-show (featuring the Q&A at the end). Together, the sequence of 26 Q&As with an image, feature a matrix of the type that Christopher Alexander called a pattern (with the interception X added here). The argument for making an account and finding uses for hiccups is: if unattended they leave a long tail, a growing shadow discussed here in Goethe’s and Jung’s terms. If hiccups are understood as elements occurring in a sequence/edition for which there is no rule, nor any currently existing learning algorithm, then they will tend to aggregate. If left unaccounted and unattended they will grow on par with the power and multiplication of computers in human exchange (i.e., a long entropic tail). Hence we here have a candidate model to explain how human and environmental relations could escalate to states of exception in a variety of un/related areas. And alternatives of how to deal with them are within reach of research. A solution that eliminates the problem—or, an answer that eliminates the question—contains no knowledge. SYNOPSIS From the exhibition element shown in Gallery ROM61 at KMD, for the seminar Tracing Rhythm, a carousel of slides were slung in a spiral out of the Lineup called La Kahina. Her journey around the world as the wife of a diplomat called K, features a variety of homes: domestic interiors adapted to a variety of local circumstances and the job. On the backdrop of this adaptive enclosure the life and work of her husband: the Norwegian political positions in the global oil and gas-trade. Between them a middle zone dedicated to mundane and cultural events: La Kahina’s home is never quite private, and K’s diplomatic errands are never quite public. The middle zone is fringe-space between the private and public domains. It is compared with Goethe’s studio and Arne Næss cabin at Tvergastein (Hallingskarvet). From this an idea of a proximal space—smaller than the world but wider than the body—is connected to the come-and-go between studio-work and fieldwork. In this setting, three art works are compared in terms of how they differently combine field- and studio-work: William Kentridge, Geir Harald Samuelsen, Dragoş Gheorghiu. It is suggested that the vectorial sum of field- and studio-work are organised according to 3 material tropes (Karen Barad): entanglement, superposition and intra-action. From this it is further anticipated that complex phenomena will be composite in terms of these 3 tropes. Providing a ground work for understanding current critical turns. The two chief conversation partners are here Bruno Latour’s titles: Down to Earth (2018) and After lockdown (2021). The idea of the long-tail model above came from there. The essay (attached) was written in preparation to the seminar Tracing Rhythm to reach a ground zero from where the images could be at the forefront. The result was a hiccup: that is, it produced a phenomenological equivalent—or, the event—of Shannon’s definition of information as entropy. On account of the multiplication of images perceived owing to the many instrumental shifts in the production of a photogravure, the techniques becomes an experimental laboratory to explore image collapse into object perception. The Kahina lineup attempts to transpose the production of this transition into an exhibition space, in making the image to object perception available to the viewer in the form of a debatable proposition. However, the photogravure process also features an artistic proposition (exposition) as an active model of similar types of problem (outlined above): notably types of processes where object perception is indeterminately anticipated and proposed. Calling on a hammerbolt, or featuring a counter-beat. As an entry/exit device in working with diary materials—as is the case in the National Library residency in which the project is currently hatching—photgravure has a similar function as the wind-rose on maps. One that steers towards the hatching of an object. Most probably a book. The hosting PKU project—Matter Gesture and Soul—is one of the unique arenas where academic pursuits and research can combine with workshop premises of the art field. Matter Gesture and Soul (DIKU/KMD)

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Zubiaurre, Elena; Bele, Bolette; Simon, Veronique Karine; Reher, Guillermo S.; Rodríguez, Ana Delia; Alonso, Rodrigo; Castiglioni, Benedetta;

    The Faro Convention underlined the importance of educational initiatives related to heritage. This paper focuses on the educational dimension of landscape, as a means to better facilitate its social acceptance and hence its inclusion in planning and management processes. The relation between landscape education and social perception, through a few European examples will be analysed to ascertain whether the principles of the Convention are being complied with effectively. The authors introduce four case studies of heritage-related education carried out in three European countries (Spain, Norway and Italy). These case studies provide the possibility to coherently analyse a wide range of activities and initiatives occurring at various scales and levels: geographic, local and sectoral. In addition, they describe the pedagogical potential of cultural landscapes and cultural heritage, and highlight some of the educational strategies and measures currently used in this field.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    García-Díaz, José Antonio; Colomo-Palacios, Ricardo; Valencia-Garcia, Rafael;
    Publisher: Elsevier

    In general, people are usually more reluctant to follow advice and directions from politicians who do not have their ideology. In extreme cases, people can be heavily biased in favour of a political party at the same time that they are in sharp disagreement with others, which may lead to irrational decision making and can put people’s lives at risk by ignoring certain recommendations from the authorities. Therefore, considering political ideology as a psychographic trait can improve political micro-targeting by helping public authorities and local governments to adopt better communication policies during crises. In this work, we explore the reliability of determining psychographic traits concerning political ideology. Our contribution is twofold. On the one hand, we release the PoliCorpus-2020, a dataset composed by Spanish politicians’ tweets posted in 2020. On the other hand, we conduct two authorship analysis tasks with the aforementioned dataset: an author profiling task to extract demographic and psychographic traits, and an authorship attribution task to determine the author of an anonymous text in the political domain. Both experiments are evaluated with several neural network architectures grounded on explainable linguistic features, statistical features, and state-of-the-art transformers. In addition, we test whether the neural network models can be transferred to detect the political ideology of citizens. Our results indicate that the linguistic features are good indicators for identifying finegrained political affiliation, they boost the performance of neural network models when combined with embedding-based features, and they preserve relevant information when the models are tested with ordinary citizens. Besides, we found that lexical and morphosyntactic features are more effective on author profiling, whereas stylometric features are more effective in authorship attribution.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Von Essen, Erica; Van der Wal, René; Turnbull, Jonathon; Searle, Adam; Hofmeester, Tim R.;

    Digital surveillance technologies enable a range of publics to observe the private lives of wild animals. Publics can now encounter wildlife from their smartphones, home computers, and other digital devices. These technologies generate public-wildlife relations that produce digital intimacy, but also summon wildlife into relations of care, commodification, and control. Via three case studies, this paper examines the biopolitical implications of such technologically mediated human-animal relations, which are becoming increasingly common and complex in the Digital Anthropocene. Each of our case studies involves a different biopolitical rationale deployed by a scientific-managerial regime: (1) clampdown (wild boar); (2) care (golden eagle); and (3) control (moose). Each of these modalities of biopower, however, is entangled with the other, inaugurating complex relations between publics, scientists, and wildlife. We show how digital technologies can predetermine certain representations of wildlife by encouraging particular gazes, which can have negative repercussions for public-wildlife relations in both digital and offline spaces. However, there remains work to be done to understand the positive public-wildlife relations inaugurated by digital mediation. Here, departing from much extant literature on digital human-animal relations, we highlight some of these positive potentials, notably: voice, immediacy, and agency.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kristoffersen, Martin; Log, Torgrim;
    Publisher: Elsevier

    There is a genuine will to protect Nordic wooden towns in Norway, as they are considered national heritage and an important part of the urban identity. The fire protection of wooden heritage towns is an ongoing cooperation between private owners, who are required to keep their property up to codes, and the authorities who works to limit the residual conflagration risk. The present study systemizes national fire protection initiatives and present successes and challenges. Research literature, legal framework, and municipality fire safety site plans were analyzed. Personnel from involved municipalities, fire services and national directorates were interviewed. Compared to other countries, Norway has indeed come a long way regarding practical fire mitigating measures. In year 2000, the first fire safety plans dedicated to protecting wooden towns were developed. In 2014, 25% of the wooden towns had fire safety plans, and in 2020, 60%. Status as national heritage and thus, financial support from the Directorate of Cultural Heritage, was the most important success factor. Measures were often not evaluated prior to implementation, partly due to lack of horizontal knowledge sharing between the municipalities involved. Important lessons have thus been gained separately, and not shared. Smoke detection alarming the fire brigades directly is documented to have prevented major heritage losses. The most common firefighting challenges were related to locating and accessing fires in cavities. Through clearer wording in regulations, and better knowledge sharing, fire protection could be improved with limited additional costs.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sætra, Henrik Skaug; Danaher, John;
    Publisher: Springer

    Ethics plays a key role in the normative analysis of the impacts of technology. We know that computers in general and the processing of data, the use of artificial intelligence, and the combination of computers and/or artificial intelligence with robotics are all associated with ethically relevant implications for individuals, groups, and society. In this article, we argue that while all technologies are ethically relevant, there is no need to create a separate ‘ethics of X’ or ‘X ethics’ for each and every subtype of technology or technological property—e.g. computer ethics, AI ethics, data ethics, information ethics, robot ethics, and machine ethics. Specific technologies might have specific impacts, but we argue that they are often sufficiently covered and understood through already established higher-level domains of ethics. Furthermore, the proliferation of tech ethics is problematic because (a) the conceptual boundaries between the subfields are not well-defined, (b) it leads to a duplication of effort and constant reinventing the wheel, and (c) there is danger that participants overlook or ignore more fundamental ethical insights and truths. The key to avoiding such outcomes lies in a taking the discipline of ethics seriously, and we consequently begin with a brief description of what ethics is, before presenting the main forms of technology related ethics. Through this process, we develop a hierarchy of technology ethics, which can be used by developers and engineers, researchers, or regulators who seek an understanding of the ethical implications of technology. We close by deducing two principles for positioning ethical analysis which will, in combination with the hierarchy, promote the leveraging of existing knowledge and help us to avoid an exaggerated proliferation of tech ethics.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jafri, Maryam;
    Publisher: Kunsthøgskolen i Oslo
    Country: Norway

    Fotodokumentasjon An inquiry into the limits of using images by and of other people in today’s networked, socially-mediated landscape. The project aims to situate contemporary image culture at the intersection of art, law and ethics. The point of departure is a real life incident in which the artist was accused of violating the privacy of an individual imaged in a video that was on display in her recent exhibition.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kotsadam, Andreas; Lind, Jo Thori; Modalsli, Jørgen;
    Publisher: Springer

    At the turn of the twentieth century, Norway, like many other countries, experienced a decrease in mortality and a substantial increase in the number of health personnel. In order to assess how these changes were connected, we investigate the relationship between health personnel and mortality using data at the medical district level (N=106) covering a period of 34 years. We find a large and robust effect of midwives on reduced maternal mortality in rural areas, but no effect in urban areas. No clear effect is found for other types of health personnel or on infant mortality. The results demonstrate the important role played by public health investments during the period.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nicu, Ionut Cristi; Lombardo, Luigi; Rubensdotter, Brita Lena Eleonor Fredin;

    Permafrost-dependent landslides occur in a range of sizes and are among the most dynamic landforms in the Arctic in the warming climate. Retrogressive thaw slumps (RTSs) are enlarging landslides triggered by thawing and release of excess water from permafrost ground ice, causing smaller or larger collapses of ground surface, which in turn exposes new permafrost to rapid thawing and collapse. In this study, a preliminary assessment of previous thaw slump activity in Nordenskiöld Land area of Svalbard is made based on remote sensing digitisation of 400 slump-scar features from aerial images from the Norwegian Polar Institute (NPI). RTS properties and distribution are analysed with an emphasis on their implications for the preservation of the Svalbard’s cultural heritage (CH). Our analysis shows that the areas where RTS scars and CH co-exist in Nordenskiöld Land are, at present, limited and cover mainly areas distributed along north-west (Colesbukta, Grønfjorden, Kapp Starostin), north-east (Sassendalen and Sassenfjorden) and south-west (Van Muydenbukta) coastlines. Taking into consideration the preliminary aspect of this inventory and study, it can be stated that for now, RTS and CH sites do not have a high level of co-existence, except for eight sites which are located at less than 100 m to a RTS and one site that is located inside a currently inactive slump-scar. Further mapping of RTS will be undertaken in order to have a complete picture of these climate triggered landslides potentially threatening the Arctic CH. The results of this study, even if preliminary, can be used by local authorities and stakeholders in prioritising future documentation and mitigation measures and can thus present a powerful tool in disaster risk reduction.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Barth, Theodor;
    Publisher: KHiO

    The flyer-series (dataset 1HEX) departs from the existence of mathematics in literary prose—for public exposés—in the Romantic era. And from here pursues the gross-fertilisation of group-theory in art and science. Featuring the idea of disordered systems (that comes from structural geology) and the keeping of logbooks in field studies. The flyer-set uses the same knowledge basis as Rosalind Krauss in the essay Sculpture in the Expanded Field, i.a. an article on structure in mathematics by Marc Barbut in Les Temps Modernes. The argument is merological: i.e., how we can study part-whole relations in terms of restricted, principal and expanded sets.