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The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
108 Research products, page 1 of 11

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
  • Publications
  • Other research products
  • 2022-2022
  • DK

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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Chen Li; Dimitrios Chrysostomou; Daniela Pinto; Andreas Kornmaaler Hansen; Simon Bøgh; Ole Madsen;
    Publisher: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
    Country: Denmark

    <p>Assisting employees in acquiring the knowledge and skills necessary to grasp and use new services and technologies on the shop floor is critical for manufacturers to adapt to Industry 4.0 successfully. In this paper, we employ a Learning, Training, Assistance (LTA) approach and propose a framework for a Language-enabled Virtual Assistant (VA) to facilitate this adaptation. In our system, the human-robot interaction is achieved through spoken natural language and a dashboard implemented as a web-based application. This type of interaction enables operators of all levels to control a collaborative robot intuitively in several industrial scenarios and use it as a complementary tool for developing their competencies. Our proposed framework has been extensively tested with 29 users who completed various tasks while interacting with the proposed VA and industrial robots. Through three different scenarios, we evaluated the usability of the system for LTA based on an established System Usability Scale and the cognitive effort required by the users based on the standardised NASA-TLX questionnaire. The qualitative and quantitative results of the study show that users of all levels found the VA user friendly with low requirements for physical and mental effort during the interaction. Additionally, the study demonstrates that the VA enables operators to streamline the learning and training phases of new tasks and improve their user experience during the assistance phase for daily tasks. The source code of the proposed VA and the supplementary material of the user study are accessible at https://bit.ly/VA_MAX to support the reproducibility of the proposed framework.</p>

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Buhl, Mie; Haïkö, Tarja; Hildén, Dan Tommi; Skov, Kirsten; Marklund, Frida; Heinonen, Mikael;
    Country: Denmark

    Research topic/aimThe project aim was to explore the learning potentials in 3D-sculpting for art teachers through identifying new image-making processes in modelling and sculpturing. The aim was further to integrate the outcome of the project in didactics and teaching activities for art education teachers connected to subject area. The project was a collaboration between universities and partners carried out between the years 2020-2022: Aalborg university and College University Copenhagen in Denmark, Umeå university and Gothenburg university in Sweden. Research questions - How does the creation process, starting with creation of a sculpture by a analogue manual mastery of a material, transform into a digital format?- How does the linear creation process, governed by material qualities, take new directions from the point where the creation of the sculpture takes place via programming and 2D testing?Theoretical frameworkThe process of sculpting can be seen as a transformation of subject-related competences, since manual aesthetic modelling skills are replaced with aesthetic coding skills, and there is no bodily contact with material (Sack, 2019). The sculpture produced by digital intervention is not a replacement of a known sculptural process, but a new image-making process. Technology creates a division between the hand, tool and material and introduces distance between bodily perceptions and the object, but it also involves a pattern of thought connected to programming skills. From a visual arts perspective, this may reinforce students’ programming skills or it allows students who are more skilled in programming than art to express themselves visually. From the perspective of technology comprehension this may meet the overall learning objectives of technological capacity building and the subject specific learning objective of programming and construction (Buhl & Skov, 2020). MethodThe project focused on 3D-modelling and explored how the use of digital technology may contribute to form new perspectives on the classical sculpture techniques of adding, carving or modelling analogue materials. The development project was primarily linked to art teacher education in the partner institutions, secondly to teaching visual arts in primary and secondary schools. The project was organized as a combination of online instructions, offline activities and online discussion forums. The theoretical framework is based on insights from studies in computational thinking in art education, and visual culture studies. Further the project was aiming at improving the participants image-making competence within sculpturing and 3D technology through the use of the program TinkerCad.Result The project contributed to enhancement of knowledge of visual 3D-modelling, photogrammetry and use of TinkerCad among art teacher educators and stimulated to 3D projects in the school subject visual arts as a platform for developing visual competence, modelling and sculpting. The project activities contributed at overcoming the focus on technological implications of the 3D practices and instead study the sculptural qualities from using the technology artistically as well as looking at the didactic implementation.Relevance for Nordic educationThe outcome of the development project will feed into a Nordic discussion about how digital technology not only adds new tools for visual arts production but may transform existing modes of visual expression and sensitive cognition.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Annette Rasmussen; Karen Egedal Andreasen;
    Country: Denmark

    Denmark underwent major changes in the 1800s and the first part of the 1900s, which affected the role of education in the lives of women. Until then, women in Denmark had primarily worked as homemakers with few academic opportunities; but from the early 1900s, home economics developed as a field of knowledge, and several schools of home economics appeared across the country. Several factors contributed to and influenced this development. Focusing on the period 1890–1940, which was particularly important to the development of this knowledge field in Denmark, we consider the interests promoting the growth of this field of knowledge, its educational content, and the contradictory meaning it had for the social status of women. On the one hand, the development of home economics contributed to turning home duties into an educational and occupational area, preparing for a welfare state making the private sphere a public matter. On the other hand, it tied women to the private sphere and prevented their influence in the public sphere.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Peter Øhrstrøm; Manuel González;
    Country: Denmark

    In his famous letter to A. N. Prior dated 3 September 1958, Saul Kripke suggested the use of branching time in temporal logic. In this paper, however, it is argued that Prior worked with an idea close to the notion of branching time (‘the big Y’) already the year before he received Kripke’s letter. It is likely that Prior’s findings based on this early study can explain why Prior so quickly accepted the idea of branching time when he received Kripke’s letter.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Marianne Kongerslev; Clara Juncker;
    Publisher: Copenhagen Business School
    Country: Denmark
  • Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Christofer Meinecke; David Joseph Wrisley; Stefan Jänicke;
    Publisher: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)

    The analysis of variance in complex text traditions is an arduous task when carried out manually. Text alignment algorithms provide domain experts with a robust alternative to such repetitive tasks. Existing white-box approaches allow the digital humanities to establish syntax-based metrics taking into account the spelling, morphology and order of words. However, they produce limited results, as semantic meanings are typically not taken into account. Our interdisciplinary collaboration between visualization and digital humanities combined a semi-supervised text alignment approach based on word embeddings that take not only syntactic but also semantic text features into account, thereby improving the overall quality of the alignment. In our collaboration, we developed different visual interfaces that communicate the word distribution in high-dimensional vector space generated by the underlying neural network for increased transparency, assessment of the tools reliability and overall improved hypothesis generation. We further offer visual means to enable the expert reader to feed domain knowledge into the system at multiple levels with the aim of improving both the product and the process of text alignment. This ultimately illustrates how visualization can engage with and augment complex modes of reading in the humanities.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Philip L. Gibbard; Andrew M. Bauer; Matt Edgeworth; William F. Ruddiman; Jacquelyn L. Gill; Dorothy J. Merritts; Stanley C. Finney; Lucy E. Edwards; Michael Walker; Mark A. Maslin; +1 more
    Publisher: International Union of Geological Sciences
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Matthew Howells; Kristen Ounanian;
    Country: Denmark
    Project: EC | PERICLES (770504)

    This paper examines the maintenance of the knowledge and practice of Nordic clinker boat building in the setting of coastal Denmark, characterized as a form of intangible cultural heritage (ICH). We explore the ‘working’ dimension of these boats as small-scale fishing vessels and the risks to this ICH as expressed in various policy, social, and economic domains. The paper centres around a working boatyard on the west coast of North Jutland, incorporating perspectives from a network of wooden boat builders, and those working in coastal and maritime cultural heritage in Denmark and the wider Nordic region. Threats to the continuation of the heritage in its ‘working’ form are explored using responses from semi-structured interviews, as well as documents related to the pan-Nordic application for the inscription of Nordic Clinker Boat Traditions on UNESCO’s Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. The case highlights the challenges specific to ‘boatbuilding for industry’ as a form of ICH and opens a discussion on which actors and institutions ought to be responsible for safeguarding, maintaining and cultivating its practice and renewal.

  • Publication . Article . 2022
    Authors: 
    Mike Belasus; Aoife Daly;
    Publisher: Informa UK Limited
    Project: EC | TIMBER (677152)
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Alexandra L. Morton-Hayward; Tim Thompson; Jane Thomas-Oates; Stephen Buckley; Axel Petzold; Abigail Ramsøe; Sonia O'Connor; Matthew J. Collins;
    Publisher: Informa UK Limited
    Countries: Netherlands, United Kingdom

    Brain tissue is ubiquitous in the archaeological record. Multiple, independent studies report the finding of black, resinous or shiny brain tissue, and Petrone et al. [2020 “Heat-induced Brain Vitrification from the Vesuvius Eruption in C.E. 79.” N Engl J Med. 382: 383–384; doi:10.1056/NEJMc1909867] raise the intriguing prospect of a role for vitrification in the preservation of ancient biomolecules. However, Petrone et al. (2020) have not made their raw data available, and no detailed laboratory or analytical methodology is offered. Issues of contamination and misinterpretation hampered a decade of research in biomolecular archaeology, such that addressing these sources of bias and facilitating validation of specious findings has become both routine and of paramount importance in the discipline. We argue that the evidence they present does not support their conclusion of heat-induced vitrification of human brain tissue, and that future studies should share palaeoproteomic data in an open access repository to facilitate comparative analysis of the recovery of ancient proteins and patterns of their degradation.

Advanced search in Research products
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arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
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arrow_drop_down
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The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
108 Research products, page 1 of 11
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Chen Li; Dimitrios Chrysostomou; Daniela Pinto; Andreas Kornmaaler Hansen; Simon Bøgh; Ole Madsen;
    Publisher: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
    Country: Denmark

    <p>Assisting employees in acquiring the knowledge and skills necessary to grasp and use new services and technologies on the shop floor is critical for manufacturers to adapt to Industry 4.0 successfully. In this paper, we employ a Learning, Training, Assistance (LTA) approach and propose a framework for a Language-enabled Virtual Assistant (VA) to facilitate this adaptation. In our system, the human-robot interaction is achieved through spoken natural language and a dashboard implemented as a web-based application. This type of interaction enables operators of all levels to control a collaborative robot intuitively in several industrial scenarios and use it as a complementary tool for developing their competencies. Our proposed framework has been extensively tested with 29 users who completed various tasks while interacting with the proposed VA and industrial robots. Through three different scenarios, we evaluated the usability of the system for LTA based on an established System Usability Scale and the cognitive effort required by the users based on the standardised NASA-TLX questionnaire. The qualitative and quantitative results of the study show that users of all levels found the VA user friendly with low requirements for physical and mental effort during the interaction. Additionally, the study demonstrates that the VA enables operators to streamline the learning and training phases of new tasks and improve their user experience during the assistance phase for daily tasks. The source code of the proposed VA and the supplementary material of the user study are accessible at https://bit.ly/VA_MAX to support the reproducibility of the proposed framework.</p>

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Buhl, Mie; Haïkö, Tarja; Hildén, Dan Tommi; Skov, Kirsten; Marklund, Frida; Heinonen, Mikael;
    Country: Denmark

    Research topic/aimThe project aim was to explore the learning potentials in 3D-sculpting for art teachers through identifying new image-making processes in modelling and sculpturing. The aim was further to integrate the outcome of the project in didactics and teaching activities for art education teachers connected to subject area. The project was a collaboration between universities and partners carried out between the years 2020-2022: Aalborg university and College University Copenhagen in Denmark, Umeå university and Gothenburg university in Sweden. Research questions - How does the creation process, starting with creation of a sculpture by a analogue manual mastery of a material, transform into a digital format?- How does the linear creation process, governed by material qualities, take new directions from the point where the creation of the sculpture takes place via programming and 2D testing?Theoretical frameworkThe process of sculpting can be seen as a transformation of subject-related competences, since manual aesthetic modelling skills are replaced with aesthetic coding skills, and there is no bodily contact with material (Sack, 2019). The sculpture produced by digital intervention is not a replacement of a known sculptural process, but a new image-making process. Technology creates a division between the hand, tool and material and introduces distance between bodily perceptions and the object, but it also involves a pattern of thought connected to programming skills. From a visual arts perspective, this may reinforce students’ programming skills or it allows students who are more skilled in programming than art to express themselves visually. From the perspective of technology comprehension this may meet the overall learning objectives of technological capacity building and the subject specific learning objective of programming and construction (Buhl & Skov, 2020). MethodThe project focused on 3D-modelling and explored how the use of digital technology may contribute to form new perspectives on the classical sculpture techniques of adding, carving or modelling analogue materials. The development project was primarily linked to art teacher education in the partner institutions, secondly to teaching visual arts in primary and secondary schools. The project was organized as a combination of online instructions, offline activities and online discussion forums. The theoretical framework is based on insights from studies in computational thinking in art education, and visual culture studies. Further the project was aiming at improving the participants image-making competence within sculpturing and 3D technology through the use of the program TinkerCad.Result The project contributed to enhancement of knowledge of visual 3D-modelling, photogrammetry and use of TinkerCad among art teacher educators and stimulated to 3D projects in the school subject visual arts as a platform for developing visual competence, modelling and sculpting. The project activities contributed at overcoming the focus on technological implications of the 3D practices and instead study the sculptural qualities from using the technology artistically as well as looking at the didactic implementation.Relevance for Nordic educationThe outcome of the development project will feed into a Nordic discussion about how digital technology not only adds new tools for visual arts production but may transform existing modes of visual expression and sensitive cognition.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Annette Rasmussen; Karen Egedal Andreasen;
    Country: Denmark

    Denmark underwent major changes in the 1800s and the first part of the 1900s, which affected the role of education in the lives of women. Until then, women in Denmark had primarily worked as homemakers with few academic opportunities; but from the early 1900s, home economics developed as a field of knowledge, and several schools of home economics appeared across the country. Several factors contributed to and influenced this development. Focusing on the period 1890–1940, which was particularly important to the development of this knowledge field in Denmark, we consider the interests promoting the growth of this field of knowledge, its educational content, and the contradictory meaning it had for the social status of women. On the one hand, the development of home economics contributed to turning home duties into an educational and occupational area, preparing for a welfare state making the private sphere a public matter. On the other hand, it tied women to the private sphere and prevented their influence in the public sphere.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Peter Øhrstrøm; Manuel González;
    Country: Denmark

    In his famous letter to A. N. Prior dated 3 September 1958, Saul Kripke suggested the use of branching time in temporal logic. In this paper, however, it is argued that Prior worked with an idea close to the notion of branching time (‘the big Y’) already the year before he received Kripke’s letter. It is likely that Prior’s findings based on this early study can explain why Prior so quickly accepted the idea of branching time when he received Kripke’s letter.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Marianne Kongerslev; Clara Juncker;
    Publisher: Copenhagen Business School
    Country: Denmark
  • Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Christofer Meinecke; David Joseph Wrisley; Stefan Jänicke;
    Publisher: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)

    The analysis of variance in complex text traditions is an arduous task when carried out manually. Text alignment algorithms provide domain experts with a robust alternative to such repetitive tasks. Existing white-box approaches allow the digital humanities to establish syntax-based metrics taking into account the spelling, morphology and order of words. However, they produce limited results, as semantic meanings are typically not taken into account. Our interdisciplinary collaboration between visualization and digital humanities combined a semi-supervised text alignment approach based on word embeddings that take not only syntactic but also semantic text features into account, thereby improving the overall quality of the alignment. In our collaboration, we developed different visual interfaces that communicate the word distribution in high-dimensional vector space generated by the underlying neural network for increased transparency, assessment of the tools reliability and overall improved hypothesis generation. We further offer visual means to enable the expert reader to feed domain knowledge into the system at multiple levels with the aim of improving both the product and the process of text alignment. This ultimately illustrates how visualization can engage with and augment complex modes of reading in the humanities.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Philip L. Gibbard; Andrew M. Bauer; Matt Edgeworth; William F. Ruddiman; Jacquelyn L. Gill; Dorothy J. Merritts; Stanley C. Finney; Lucy E. Edwards; Michael Walker; Mark A. Maslin; +1 more
    Publisher: International Union of Geological Sciences
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Matthew Howells; Kristen Ounanian;
    Country: Denmark
    Project: EC | PERICLES (770504)

    This paper examines the maintenance of the knowledge and practice of Nordic clinker boat building in the setting of coastal Denmark, characterized as a form of intangible cultural heritage (ICH). We explore the ‘working’ dimension of these boats as small-scale fishing vessels and the risks to this ICH as expressed in various policy, social, and economic domains. The paper centres around a working boatyard on the west coast of North Jutland, incorporating perspectives from a network of wooden boat builders, and those working in coastal and maritime cultural heritage in Denmark and the wider Nordic region. Threats to the continuation of the heritage in its ‘working’ form are explored using responses from semi-structured interviews, as well as documents related to the pan-Nordic application for the inscription of Nordic Clinker Boat Traditions on UNESCO’s Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. The case highlights the challenges specific to ‘boatbuilding for industry’ as a form of ICH and opens a discussion on which actors and institutions ought to be responsible for safeguarding, maintaining and cultivating its practice and renewal.

  • Publication . Article . 2022
    Authors: 
    Mike Belasus; Aoife Daly;
    Publisher: Informa UK Limited
    Project: EC | TIMBER (677152)
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Alexandra L. Morton-Hayward; Tim Thompson; Jane Thomas-Oates; Stephen Buckley; Axel Petzold; Abigail Ramsøe; Sonia O'Connor; Matthew J. Collins;
    Publisher: Informa UK Limited
    Countries: Netherlands, United Kingdom

    Brain tissue is ubiquitous in the archaeological record. Multiple, independent studies report the finding of black, resinous or shiny brain tissue, and Petrone et al. [2020 “Heat-induced Brain Vitrification from the Vesuvius Eruption in C.E. 79.” N Engl J Med. 382: 383–384; doi:10.1056/NEJMc1909867] raise the intriguing prospect of a role for vitrification in the preservation of ancient biomolecules. However, Petrone et al. (2020) have not made their raw data available, and no detailed laboratory or analytical methodology is offered. Issues of contamination and misinterpretation hampered a decade of research in biomolecular archaeology, such that addressing these sources of bias and facilitating validation of specious findings has become both routine and of paramount importance in the discipline. We argue that the evidence they present does not support their conclusion of heat-induced vitrification of human brain tissue, and that future studies should share palaeoproteomic data in an open access repository to facilitate comparative analysis of the recovery of ancient proteins and patterns of their degradation.