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4,009 Research products, page 1 of 401

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
  • Other research products
  • 2013-2022
  • English
  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Armaselu, Florentina;
    Country: Luxembourg

    Natural language processing (NLP) for detecting lexical semantic change and linguistic linked open data (LLOD) are two areas of research that have shown promising results in the latest years. However, their potential of being considered together for analysing and representing semantic change from a humanistic perspective needs further study and development. The talk will present an overview of theoretical aspects, NLP techniques and LLOD formalisms intended to this purpose, and will focus on a project developed as a humanities use case within the COST Action “Nexus Linguarum - European network for Web-centred linguistic data science.” The discussion will include preliminary thoughts on the conception of a system that combines dictionary information with corpus evidence, and provides multilingual diachronic ontologies for humanities research.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Barth, Theodor;
    Publisher: KMD
    Country: Norway

    Research portfolio THE PROBLEM: The collection of items available as uploads (left) are broadly concerned with a class of rhythmic events that that contain disturbing elements, or “hiccups”. Example: Firstly, secondly, weirdly and thirdly… Hiccups can occur in sequences that are either logical, procedural or both (editorial). They are e.g. relevant in connection with photogravure editions. Featuring elements that are unexplainable/irrelevant in the sequence. 1, 2, X and 3… (See Didi-Huberman for an in depth analysis of the question. Didi-Huberman, Georges. (2008). La ressemblance par contact—Archaeologie et modernité de l’empreinte. Minuit.) I am broadly scouting for ways of taking stock such odd elements to see if it is possible to intercept the weft of the passage from image- to object perception. This is done by asking a question, showing an image, and providing an answer. The images are the ones contained in the slide-show (featuring the Q&A at the end). Together, the sequence of 26 Q&As with an image, feature a matrix of the type that Christopher Alexander called a pattern (with the interception X added here). The argument for making an account and finding uses for hiccups is: if unattended they leave a long tail, a growing shadow discussed here in Goethe’s and Jung’s terms. If hiccups are understood as elements occurring in a sequence/edition for which there is no rule, nor any currently existing learning algorithm, then they will tend to aggregate. If left unaccounted and unattended they will grow on par with the power and multiplication of computers in human exchange (i.e., a long entropic tail). Hence we here have a candidate model to explain how human and environmental relations could escalate to states of exception in a variety of un/related areas. And alternatives of how to deal with them are within reach of research. A solution that eliminates the problem—or, an answer that eliminates the question—contains no knowledge. SYNOPSIS From the exhibition element shown in Gallery ROM61 at KMD, for the seminar Tracing Rhythm, a carousel of slides were slung in a spiral out of the Lineup called La Kahina. Her journey around the world as the wife of a diplomat called K, features a variety of homes: domestic interiors adapted to a variety of local circumstances and the job. On the backdrop of this adaptive enclosure the life and work of her husband: the Norwegian political positions in the global oil and gas-trade. Between them a middle zone dedicated to mundane and cultural events: La Kahina’s home is never quite private, and K’s diplomatic errands are never quite public. The middle zone is fringe-space between the private and public domains. It is compared with Goethe’s studio and Arne Næss cabin at Tvergastein (Hallingskarvet). From this an idea of a proximal space—smaller than the world but wider than the body—is connected to the come-and-go between studio-work and fieldwork. In this setting, three art works are compared in terms of how they differently combine field- and studio-work: William Kentridge, Geir Harald Samuelsen, Dragoş Gheorghiu. It is suggested that the vectorial sum of field- and studio-work are organised according to 3 material tropes (Karen Barad): entanglement, superposition and intra-action. From this it is further anticipated that complex phenomena will be composite in terms of these 3 tropes. Providing a ground work for understanding current critical turns. The two chief conversation partners are here Bruno Latour’s titles: Down to Earth (2018) and After lockdown (2021). The idea of the long-tail model above came from there. The essay (attached) was written in preparation to the seminar Tracing Rhythm to reach a ground zero from where the images could be at the forefront. The result was a hiccup: that is, it produced a phenomenological equivalent—or, the event—of Shannon’s definition of information as entropy. On account of the multiplication of images perceived owing to the many instrumental shifts in the production of a photogravure, the techniques becomes an experimental laboratory to explore image collapse into object perception. The Kahina lineup attempts to transpose the production of this transition into an exhibition space, in making the image to object perception available to the viewer in the form of a debatable proposition. However, the photogravure process also features an artistic proposition (exposition) as an active model of similar types of problem (outlined above): notably types of processes where object perception is indeterminately anticipated and proposed. Calling on a hammerbolt, or featuring a counter-beat. As an entry/exit device in working with diary materials—as is the case in the National Library residency in which the project is currently hatching—photgravure has a similar function as the wind-rose on maps. One that steers towards the hatching of an object. Most probably a book. The hosting PKU project—Matter Gesture and Soul—is one of the unique arenas where academic pursuits and research can combine with workshop premises of the art field. Matter Gesture and Soul (DIKU/KMD)

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dong, Ximing;
    Country: Canada

    Bi-directional Encoder Representations from Transformers (BERT) is the state-of-the-art deep learning model for pre-training natural language processing (NLP) tasks such as sentiment analysis. The BERT model dynamically generates word representations according to the context and semantics using its bi-directional and attention mechanism features. The model, although, improves precision on NLP tasks, is compute-intensive and time-consuming to deploy on mobile or smaller platforms. In this thesis, to address this issue, we use knowledge distillation (KD), a "teacher-student" training technique, to compress the model. We use the BERT model as the "teacher" model to transfer knowledge to student models, ``first-generation'' convolution neural networks, and long-short term memory with attention mechanism (LSTM-atten). We conduct various experiments on sentiment analysis benchmark data sets and show that the “student models” through knowledge distillation have better performance with 70% improvement in accuracy, precision, recall, and F1-score compared to models without KD. We also investigate the convergence rate of student models and compare the results to the existing models in the literature. Finally, we show that compared to the full-size BERT model, our RNN series models are 50 times smaller in size and retain approximately 96% performance on benchmark data sets.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lerchi, A.; Krap, T.; Eppenberger, P.; Pedergnana, A.;
    Country: Netherlands

    Residue analysis is an established area of expertise focused on detecting traces of substances found on the surface of objects. It is routinely employed in forensic casework and increasingly incorporated into archaeological investigations.In archaeology, sampling and data interpretation sometimes lacked strict standards, resulting in incorrect residue classifications. In particular, molecular signals of salts of fatty acids identified by FTIR have been, at times, interpreted as evidence for adipocere, a substance formed as a consequence of adipose tissues' degradation.This article reviews and discusses the possibilities and limitations of the analytical protocols used in residue analysis in archaeology. The focus is on three main points: (1) reviewing the decomposition processes and the chemical components of adipocere; (2) highlighting potential misidentifications of adipocere while, at the same time, addressing issues related to residue preservation and contamination; and (3) proposing new research avenues to identify adipocere on archaeological objects.(c) 2022 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Jacobs, Marc;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
    Country: Belgium

    review of Marilena Alivizatou, Intangible Heritage and Participation. Encounters with Safeguarding Practices

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rulkens, C.C.S.; Van Eyghen, Hans; Pear, Rachel; Peels, R.; Bouter, Lex; Stols-Witlox, Maartje; van den Brink, Gijsbert; Meloni, Sabrina; Buijsen, Edwin; van Woudenberg, René;
    Publisher: Center for Open Sciences
    Country: Netherlands

    At the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, we have set out to explore the strengths and limitations of replication studies in the humanities in practice. We are doing so by replicating two original studies: one in the field of art history, the other in the field of history of science and religion. In this blog, we outline the design, purposes, and aims of these projects and explore some of the challenges.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . InteractiveResource . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jana Ameye; Mario Hernandez; Tim Van de Voorde;
    Publisher: BELSPO
    Country: Belgium

    The main objective of the Belspo-funded LIMAMAL project was to support archaeologists in creating 3D terrain visualizations based on Lidar data and Pléiades stereoscopic imagery, and a combination or “fusion” thereof. A case study was developed to demonstrate the application of Pléiades imagery and light detection and ranging (lidar) technologies for prospection and visualization of the Mesoamerican archaeological landscape. Based on this case study, guidelines in English and Spanish have been developed to explain the technical processing. The project involved a stakeholder: the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH), a Mexican federal government institution responsible for research, conservation, protection and spreading of knowledge on Mexican cultural heritage. The case study and guidelines were presented to the stakeholder and other interested parties during several meetings held during a short mission to Yucatan, Mexico in the spring of 2022.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Diakonova, Marina; Ghirelli, Corinna; Molina Sánchez, Luis; Pérez García, Javier José;
    Publisher: Banco de España
    Country: Spain

    En el presente artículo se muestra como la incertidumbre política y las variables que miden el conflicto impactan sobre la actividad económica en Rusia (y en concreto sobre el PIB). Para ello se utilizan diversos indicadores que miden el conflicto, referidos a aspectos específicos de este concepto general: riesgo geopolítico, malestar social, brotes de violencia y conflicto armado interno. Para la incertidumbre sobre el curso de la política económica se emplea el habitual EPU (indicador de incertidumbre de política económica). En el artículo se utilizan dos enfoques empíricos distintos pero complementarios. El primero se basa en un modelo de predicción de frecuencia mixta de series de tiempo (MIDAS), en el que se muestra que los indicadores de conflicto aportan información útil para pronosticar el PIB a corto plazo, incluso controlando por un conjunto amplio de variables macrofinancieras. El segundo enfoque es un modelo de vectores autorregresivos estructural (SVAR), en el que se muestra que los shocks de los indicadores de conflicto generan una desaceleración de la actividad, con una caída persistente del crecimiento del PIB y un incremento efímero pero sustancial de las primas de riesgo. We show how policy uncertainty and conflict-related shocks impact the dynamics of economic activity (GDP) in Russia. We use alternative indicators of “conflict”, relating to specific aspects of this general concept: geopolitical risk, social unrest, outbreaks of political violence and escalations into internal armed conflict. For policy uncertainty we employ the workhorse economic policy uncertainty (EPU) indicator. We use two distinct but complementary empirical approaches. The first is based on a time series mixed-frequency forecasting model. We show that the indicators provide useful information for forecasting GDP in the short run, even when controlling for a comprehensive set of standard high-frequency macro-financial variables. The second approach, is a SVAR model. We show that negative shocks to the selected indicators lead to economic slowdown, with a persistent drop in GDP growth and a short-lived but large increase in country risk.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Brown, Susan; Bath, Jon; Crompton, Constance; Jenstad, Janelle; Martin, Kim; Roger, Sarah;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    The Linked Infrastructure for Networked Cultural Scholarship (LINCS) project is converting large datasets into an organized, interconnected, machine-processable set of resources for Canadian cultural research. LINCS aims to provide context for the cultural material that currently floats around online, interlink it, ground it in its sources, and help to make the World Wide Web a trusted resource for scholarly knowledge production. With a team of technical and domain experts, LINCS is allowing Canadian scholars and partner institutions to play a significant role in the developing the Semantic Web. The LINCS Project Charter sets out the project's core objectives and guides how participants in the project commit to relating to each other to achieve these outcomes.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    De Angeli, Aglaia;
    Country: United Kingdom
Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
4,009 Research products, page 1 of 401
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Armaselu, Florentina;
    Country: Luxembourg

    Natural language processing (NLP) for detecting lexical semantic change and linguistic linked open data (LLOD) are two areas of research that have shown promising results in the latest years. However, their potential of being considered together for analysing and representing semantic change from a humanistic perspective needs further study and development. The talk will present an overview of theoretical aspects, NLP techniques and LLOD formalisms intended to this purpose, and will focus on a project developed as a humanities use case within the COST Action “Nexus Linguarum - European network for Web-centred linguistic data science.” The discussion will include preliminary thoughts on the conception of a system that combines dictionary information with corpus evidence, and provides multilingual diachronic ontologies for humanities research.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Barth, Theodor;
    Publisher: KMD
    Country: Norway

    Research portfolio THE PROBLEM: The collection of items available as uploads (left) are broadly concerned with a class of rhythmic events that that contain disturbing elements, or “hiccups”. Example: Firstly, secondly, weirdly and thirdly… Hiccups can occur in sequences that are either logical, procedural or both (editorial). They are e.g. relevant in connection with photogravure editions. Featuring elements that are unexplainable/irrelevant in the sequence. 1, 2, X and 3… (See Didi-Huberman for an in depth analysis of the question. Didi-Huberman, Georges. (2008). La ressemblance par contact—Archaeologie et modernité de l’empreinte. Minuit.) I am broadly scouting for ways of taking stock such odd elements to see if it is possible to intercept the weft of the passage from image- to object perception. This is done by asking a question, showing an image, and providing an answer. The images are the ones contained in the slide-show (featuring the Q&A at the end). Together, the sequence of 26 Q&As with an image, feature a matrix of the type that Christopher Alexander called a pattern (with the interception X added here). The argument for making an account and finding uses for hiccups is: if unattended they leave a long tail, a growing shadow discussed here in Goethe’s and Jung’s terms. If hiccups are understood as elements occurring in a sequence/edition for which there is no rule, nor any currently existing learning algorithm, then they will tend to aggregate. If left unaccounted and unattended they will grow on par with the power and multiplication of computers in human exchange (i.e., a long entropic tail). Hence we here have a candidate model to explain how human and environmental relations could escalate to states of exception in a variety of un/related areas. And alternatives of how to deal with them are within reach of research. A solution that eliminates the problem—or, an answer that eliminates the question—contains no knowledge. SYNOPSIS From the exhibition element shown in Gallery ROM61 at KMD, for the seminar Tracing Rhythm, a carousel of slides were slung in a spiral out of the Lineup called La Kahina. Her journey around the world as the wife of a diplomat called K, features a variety of homes: domestic interiors adapted to a variety of local circumstances and the job. On the backdrop of this adaptive enclosure the life and work of her husband: the Norwegian political positions in the global oil and gas-trade. Between them a middle zone dedicated to mundane and cultural events: La Kahina’s home is never quite private, and K’s diplomatic errands are never quite public. The middle zone is fringe-space between the private and public domains. It is compared with Goethe’s studio and Arne Næss cabin at Tvergastein (Hallingskarvet). From this an idea of a proximal space—smaller than the world but wider than the body—is connected to the come-and-go between studio-work and fieldwork. In this setting, three art works are compared in terms of how they differently combine field- and studio-work: William Kentridge, Geir Harald Samuelsen, Dragoş Gheorghiu. It is suggested that the vectorial sum of field- and studio-work are organised according to 3 material tropes (Karen Barad): entanglement, superposition and intra-action. From this it is further anticipated that complex phenomena will be composite in terms of these 3 tropes. Providing a ground work for understanding current critical turns. The two chief conversation partners are here Bruno Latour’s titles: Down to Earth (2018) and After lockdown (2021). The idea of the long-tail model above came from there. The essay (attached) was written in preparation to the seminar Tracing Rhythm to reach a ground zero from where the images could be at the forefront. The result was a hiccup: that is, it produced a phenomenological equivalent—or, the event—of Shannon’s definition of information as entropy. On account of the multiplication of images perceived owing to the many instrumental shifts in the production of a photogravure, the techniques becomes an experimental laboratory to explore image collapse into object perception. The Kahina lineup attempts to transpose the production of this transition into an exhibition space, in making the image to object perception available to the viewer in the form of a debatable proposition. However, the photogravure process also features an artistic proposition (exposition) as an active model of similar types of problem (outlined above): notably types of processes where object perception is indeterminately anticipated and proposed. Calling on a hammerbolt, or featuring a counter-beat. As an entry/exit device in working with diary materials—as is the case in the National Library residency in which the project is currently hatching—photgravure has a similar function as the wind-rose on maps. One that steers towards the hatching of an object. Most probably a book. The hosting PKU project—Matter Gesture and Soul—is one of the unique arenas where academic pursuits and research can combine with workshop premises of the art field. Matter Gesture and Soul (DIKU/KMD)

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dong, Ximing;
    Country: Canada

    Bi-directional Encoder Representations from Transformers (BERT) is the state-of-the-art deep learning model for pre-training natural language processing (NLP) tasks such as sentiment analysis. The BERT model dynamically generates word representations according to the context and semantics using its bi-directional and attention mechanism features. The model, although, improves precision on NLP tasks, is compute-intensive and time-consuming to deploy on mobile or smaller platforms. In this thesis, to address this issue, we use knowledge distillation (KD), a "teacher-student" training technique, to compress the model. We use the BERT model as the "teacher" model to transfer knowledge to student models, ``first-generation'' convolution neural networks, and long-short term memory with attention mechanism (LSTM-atten). We conduct various experiments on sentiment analysis benchmark data sets and show that the “student models” through knowledge distillation have better performance with 70% improvement in accuracy, precision, recall, and F1-score compared to models without KD. We also investigate the convergence rate of student models and compare the results to the existing models in the literature. Finally, we show that compared to the full-size BERT model, our RNN series models are 50 times smaller in size and retain approximately 96% performance on benchmark data sets.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lerchi, A.; Krap, T.; Eppenberger, P.; Pedergnana, A.;
    Country: Netherlands

    Residue analysis is an established area of expertise focused on detecting traces of substances found on the surface of objects. It is routinely employed in forensic casework and increasingly incorporated into archaeological investigations.In archaeology, sampling and data interpretation sometimes lacked strict standards, resulting in incorrect residue classifications. In particular, molecular signals of salts of fatty acids identified by FTIR have been, at times, interpreted as evidence for adipocere, a substance formed as a consequence of adipose tissues' degradation.This article reviews and discusses the possibilities and limitations of the analytical protocols used in residue analysis in archaeology. The focus is on three main points: (1) reviewing the decomposition processes and the chemical components of adipocere; (2) highlighting potential misidentifications of adipocere while, at the same time, addressing issues related to residue preservation and contamination; and (3) proposing new research avenues to identify adipocere on archaeological objects.(c) 2022 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Jacobs, Marc;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
    Country: Belgium

    review of Marilena Alivizatou, Intangible Heritage and Participation. Encounters with Safeguarding Practices

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rulkens, C.C.S.; Van Eyghen, Hans; Pear, Rachel; Peels, R.; Bouter, Lex; Stols-Witlox, Maartje; van den Brink, Gijsbert; Meloni, Sabrina; Buijsen, Edwin; van Woudenberg, René;
    Publisher: Center for Open Sciences
    Country: Netherlands

    At the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, we have set out to explore the strengths and limitations of replication studies in the humanities in practice. We are doing so by replicating two original studies: one in the field of art history, the other in the field of history of science and religion. In this blog, we outline the design, purposes, and aims of these projects and explore some of the challenges.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . InteractiveResource . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jana Ameye; Mario Hernandez; Tim Van de Voorde;
    Publisher: BELSPO
    Country: Belgium

    The main objective of the Belspo-funded LIMAMAL project was to support archaeologists in creating 3D terrain visualizations based on Lidar data and Pléiades stereoscopic imagery, and a combination or “fusion” thereof. A case study was developed to demonstrate the application of Pléiades imagery and light detection and ranging (lidar) technologies for prospection and visualization of the Mesoamerican archaeological landscape. Based on this case study, guidelines in English and Spanish have been developed to explain the technical processing. The project involved a stakeholder: the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH), a Mexican federal government institution responsible for research, conservation, protection and spreading of knowledge on Mexican cultural heritage. The case study and guidelines were presented to the stakeholder and other interested parties during several meetings held during a short mission to Yucatan, Mexico in the spring of 2022.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Diakonova, Marina; Ghirelli, Corinna; Molina Sánchez, Luis; Pérez García, Javier José;
    Publisher: Banco de España
    Country: Spain

    En el presente artículo se muestra como la incertidumbre política y las variables que miden el conflicto impactan sobre la actividad económica en Rusia (y en concreto sobre el PIB). Para ello se utilizan diversos indicadores que miden el conflicto, referidos a aspectos específicos de este concepto general: riesgo geopolítico, malestar social, brotes de violencia y conflicto armado interno. Para la incertidumbre sobre el curso de la política económica se emplea el habitual EPU (indicador de incertidumbre de política económica). En el artículo se utilizan dos enfoques empíricos distintos pero complementarios. El primero se basa en un modelo de predicción de frecuencia mixta de series de tiempo (MIDAS), en el que se muestra que los indicadores de conflicto aportan información útil para pronosticar el PIB a corto plazo, incluso controlando por un conjunto amplio de variables macrofinancieras. El segundo enfoque es un modelo de vectores autorregresivos estructural (SVAR), en el que se muestra que los shocks de los indicadores de conflicto generan una desaceleración de la actividad, con una caída persistente del crecimiento del PIB y un incremento efímero pero sustancial de las primas de riesgo. We show how policy uncertainty and conflict-related shocks impact the dynamics of economic activity (GDP) in Russia. We use alternative indicators of “conflict”, relating to specific aspects of this general concept: geopolitical risk, social unrest, outbreaks of political violence and escalations into internal armed conflict. For policy uncertainty we employ the workhorse economic policy uncertainty (EPU) indicator. We use two distinct but complementary empirical approaches. The first is based on a time series mixed-frequency forecasting model. We show that the indicators provide useful information for forecasting GDP in the short run, even when controlling for a comprehensive set of standard high-frequency macro-financial variables. The second approach, is a SVAR model. We show that negative shocks to the selected indicators lead to economic slowdown, with a persistent drop in GDP growth and a short-lived but large increase in country risk.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Brown, Susan; Bath, Jon; Crompton, Constance; Jenstad, Janelle; Martin, Kim; Roger, Sarah;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    The Linked Infrastructure for Networked Cultural Scholarship (LINCS) project is converting large datasets into an organized, interconnected, machine-processable set of resources for Canadian cultural research. LINCS aims to provide context for the cultural material that currently floats around online, interlink it, ground it in its sources, and help to make the World Wide Web a trusted resource for scholarly knowledge production. With a team of technical and domain experts, LINCS is allowing Canadian scholars and partner institutions to play a significant role in the developing the Semantic Web. The LINCS Project Charter sets out the project's core objectives and guides how participants in the project commit to relating to each other to achieve these outcomes.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    De Angeli, Aglaia;
    Country: United Kingdom