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20 Research products, page 1 of 2

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
  • Other research products
  • 2018-2022
  • Open Access
  • NEANIAS Space Research Community

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  • Open Access Finnish
    Authors: 
    Nieminen, Topi;
    Country: Finland

    Uudet teknologiat otetaan vastaan usein tunneperäisesti, toiset ovat kiinnostuneita, toiset epäilevät. Uudet keksinnöt ja teknologiat oikein käytettyinä avaavat meille uuden maailman, tehostavat toimintoja, lisäävät luovuutta ja mahdollistavat asioita. Tämän työn tilaajat olivat sovelluskehitysyhteisö Viastar ja kulttuurialan toimija Carnivale. Tilaajia kiinnostavat uudet teknologiat kulttuuriperinnön sovelluksissa ja hankkeissa. Tämä kehittämistyö tutki ja tarkasteli, miten voimme paremmin hyödyntää uusia teknologioita sukututkimuksen apuna. Työssä tutkittiin, miten voimme yhdistää perinteisen ja DNA-analyysiin pohjautuvan sukututkimuksen. Tässä työssä käytiin myös läpi muita uusia teknologioita, joita voidaan hyödyntää sukuhistorian ja kulttuuriperinnön tallennuksessa, tutkimuksessa sekä myös yleisemmin kulttuurituotantojen tukena. Kehittämistyötä tehtiin tutkimalla ja kokeilemalla uusia teknologioita sekä käymällä läpi laajasti opinnäytetyön tekijän sukuun liittyviä sukututkimuksia ja niiden kautta esiin tullutta kulttuuriperintöä, vanhoja kuvia, karttoja ja paikkoja. Geneettisen sukututkimuksen avulla tutkittiin isä- ja äitilinjoja eri tekniikoilla ja jäljitettiin eri sukujen kulkureittejä menneiden vuosisatojen aikoina. Tässä opinnäytetyössä analysoitiin tekijän omasta suvusta teetettyjen DNA-testien tuloksia ja osoitettiin, miten ne toimivat käytännössä sukututkimuksen välineinä. Tässä työssä käsiteltyjä muita kulttuurituotannon tekniikoita olivat drone-kuvaus, lidar-kuvaus, virtuaali- ja lisätty todellisuus. Tutkimusmenetelminä käytettiin aineistotutkimusta, DNA-testejä, havainnointia, haastattelua ja kenttätyötä kokeilemalla käytännössä erilaisissä ympäristöissä uusia teknisiä välineitä. Työn tuloksina todettiin, että uudet tekniikat toimivat sukututkimuksessa ja kulttuuriperinnön tallentamisessa erittäin hyvin. Uudet tekniikat avaavat uusia sisältöjä ja osallistavat kulttuurin tuottajan sekä kuluttajan tuotantoihin syvällisesti. Toimenpide-ehdotuksena esitettiin, että sukututkimuksessa ja kulttuurituotannoissa otettaisiin rohkeasti uusia tekniikoita laajasti käyttöön toiminnan parantamiseksi ja tehostamiseksi. New technologies are often embraced emotionally: others show interest and others doubt. It is a fact that new inventions and technologies, when used properly, open up new worlds for us, streamline operations, increase creativity and enable things. This thesis was commissioned by the application development company Viastar and the cultural sector enterprise Carnivale. Both commissioners are interested in new technologies on cultural heritage applications and projects. The objective of this study was to explore and examine how new technologies can better be utilized in genealogy. The study explored how to combine traditional and genetic genealogy research. It also reviewed some other new innovative technologies that can be used on cultural heritage research and in cultural productions. The study was carried out by exploring and experimenting new technologies and going through extensive genealogy and cultural heritage materials, old images, maps, and places that have emerged through genealogy research. In terms of genetic genealogy, lineages have been studied using different DNA techniques and the pathways of different genera have been traced over the past centuries. The study analyzed the DNA research results from the author's own lineage and show how they work in practice as a tool for genealogy. Other cultural production techniques covered in this study include drone imaging, lidar imaging, as well as virtual and augmented reality. The research methods used were document analysis, observation, interview and fieldwork by experimenting new technical tools in different environments. The results indicate that the new technologies work very well in genealogy and in saving cultural heritage. New technologies open up new content and deeply involve producers, researchers and cultural consumers in productions. The thesis proposes that genealogists and cultural sector make widespread use of new technologies to improve and increase their efficiency.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Muller, Julien (AHP);
    Publisher: Université de Lorraine

    Ce jeu de données contient des données enrichies sur les membres du Bureau des longitudes, de la création de cette institution scientifique en 1795, jusqu'à 1970 (pour la dernière date d'entrée).

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rosson, Lois Ruby;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    This dissertation examines how the practice of astronomical illustration changed and expanded over the course of the twentieth century Space Age. In the United States, the post-war period transformed outer space into a geopolitically significant environment, reorienting the authoritative picturing of space from a practice housed primarily within European astronomical observatories to one with commercial viability in American science and popular culture. In the absence of cameras capable of rendering the space environment, individual illustrators filled in pictorial gaps by hand. Between the years of 1944 and 1987, illustrators developed an aesthetic of neutrality that visually signaled the scientific accuracy of their work. This aesthetic privileged a style of representation that mirrored the technical impartiality of cameras, collapsing distinctions between “most realistic” looking with “most photographic.” The visual clarity of photographic resolution became the standard for the most successful illustrations, even though most subjects depicted required a degree of artistic license to be made visible at all. This dissertation examines the visual techniques developed to reproduce photographic-looking illustrations of unphotographable places. The status of these images as utilitarian was negotiated via a complex web of group consensus and proximity to places like NASA, educational programming at planetariums, and public television. Examining midcentury astronomical illustration as a cultural product instead of neutral technical output offers a new entry point into the visual culture of the Space Age in the United States. This study underscores the way in which socially constructed expectations about the space environment were coded into objective-looking images.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    CSIC - Departamento de Comunicación;
    Publisher: Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (España)

    Head of Communication: Abel Grau; Editorial board: Esther M. García Pastor, Alejandro Parrilla García; Writers: Lucía Casas Piñeiro, Isidoro García Cano, Esther M. García Pastor, Carmen Fernández, Ana Iglesias, Mónica Lara del Vigo, Silbia López de Lacalle, Víctor Lloret Blackburn, Alejandro Parrilla García, Belén Remacha; Photography: César Hernández, Álvaro Muñoz Guzmán, Joan Costa, Artur Martínez y Pau Franch; Translation: Fabiola Barraclough. This special issue of ‘CSIC Investiga. Journal of Science’ shows the performance of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) within the EU R&D framewok programme Horizon 2020. It presents reportages on research projects about Qur’an heritage in Europe, the exploration of Mars, the new robots that assist people, more efficient parasites controls in fishery, new sustainable packaging, methods to trace asymptomatic tuberculosis transmisión, and the historic legacy of the Senegal’s region of Pathiana, among others. Peer reviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Tryfonos, George; Ioannides, Marinos; Anastasi, A. G.; Apostolou, V. A.; Pieri, P. P.; Koundouris, M. A.; Savva, F. G.;
    Country: Cyprus

    The paper presents a novel adaptive parametric documentation, modelling and sharing methodology, which aims to achieve a continuous holistic documentation, data processing and sharing process for cultural heritage community, such as architects, engineers, archaeologists, conservators, programmers, fabricators, contest creators, game developers, scholars and common citizens. Thus, the use of advance parametric and building information modelling software allows the processing and specification of all data by creating the 3D models needed for the multidisciplinary experts. Two Cypriot case studies from the medieval time period have been chosen for the development, and evaluation of our proposed methodology in order to investigate the process of modelling and sharing all the given metadata and 3D data. The first one is the Asinou Church, a UNESCO Heritage stone monument in the Troodos Mountains with a unique interior and the Kolossi Castle, a former Crusader stronghold on the west of the city of Limassol on the island of Cyprus.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lamanna, Giovanni; Bird, Ian; Petzold, Andreas; Asmi, Ari; Brus, Magdalena; Blomberg, Niklas; Räß, Michael; Dimper, Rudolf; Gotz, Andrew; Dekker, Ron;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | ESCAPE (824064), EC | PaNOSC (823852), EC | SSHOC (823782), EC | EOSC-Life (824087), EC | ENVRI-FAIR (824068)

    THE SCIENCE CLUSTERS are EU collaborative projects that were launched in 2019 to link ESFRI and other world-class Research Infrastructures (RIs) to the European Open Science Cloud (EOSC). The main impacts of the Science Clusters’ work programme concern: the improved access of researchers to data, tools and resources, leading to new insights and innovation for data-driven science both within and beyond the context of the domains in which the clusters are rooted; the creation of a cross-border open innovation environment for FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable) data management for economies of scale, to develop synergies and rise the efficiency and productivity of researchers through open-science standards and thematic services; the enhanced co-developments to foster the cross-domain interoperability central to the EOSC goal. The Science Clusters are an integral part of EOSC. Their services and outcomes are now forming the core of the emerging EOSC fabric. As important partners of EOSC, Science Clusters contribute to its development and its implementation process. Importantly, the Science Clusters form a natural collaboration between the ESFRI RIs’ management boards partners in the clusters. As EOSC matures and begins delivering data and services for European research, a discussion is needed to stimulate the Open Science practices, cross-domain interoperability and long-term coordination of the scientific communities covered by the five Science Clusters. This position paper contributes formally to explain the urgent need of EC to support a longer-term role of the five Science Clusters to provide content to the EOSC, to enhance researchers’ involvement in Open Science and to suggest potential cooperative pathways in the Horizon-Europe framework and along with the EOSC Association roadmap. This paper is aimed at highlighting: Expectations of the clusters and the concerned research communities, pointing out a common structured vision and a series of suggestions for the future. A more detailed analysis from each cluster, that is provided for completeness.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lamanna, Giovanni; Bird, Ian; Petzold, Andreas; Asmi, Ari; Brus, Magdalena; Blomberg, Niklas; Dimper, Rudolf; Gotz, Andrew; Dekker, Ron;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | EOSC-Life (824087), EC | ESCAPE (824064), EC | SSHOC (823782), EC | PaNOSC (823852), EC | ENVRI-FAIR (824068)

    THE SCIENCE CLUSTERS are EU collaborative projects that were launched in 2019 to link ESFRI and other world-class Research Infrastructures (RIs) to the European Open Science Cloud (EOSC). The main impacts of the Science Clusters’ work programme concern: the improved access of researchers to data, tools and resources, leading to new insights and innovation for data-driven science both within and beyond the context of the domains in which the clusters are rooted; the creation of a cross-border open innovation environment for FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable) data management for economies of scale, to develop synergies and rise the efficiency and productivity of researchers through open-science standards and thematic services; the enhanced co-developments to foster the cross-domain interoperability central to the EOSC goal. The Science Clusters are an integral part of EOSC. Their services and outcomes are now forming the core of the emerging EOSC fabric. As important partners of EOSC, Science Clusters contribute to its development and its implementation process. Importantly, the Science Clusters form a natural collaboration between the ESFRI RIs’ management boards partners in the clusters. As EOSC matures and begins delivering data and services for European research, a discussion is needed to stimulate the Open Science practices, cross-domain interoperability and long-term coordination of the scientific communities covered by the five Science Clusters. This position paper contributes formally to explain the urgent need of EC to support a longer-term role of the five Science Clusters to provide content to the EOSC, to enhance researchers’ involvement in Open Science and to suggest potential cooperative pathways in the Horizon-Europe framework and along with the EOSC Association roadmap. This paper is aimed at highlighting: Expectations of the clusters and the concerned research communities, pointing out a common structured vision and a series of suggestions for the future. A more detailed analysis from each cluster, that is provided for completeness.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Annola, Minna Susanna;
    Country: Finland

    Hallucinations are believed to be as old as the human’s brain. Usually, modern people relate to hallucinations in drugs or mental illness. Modern man may not think how great impact hallucinations have had on arts, religions, and folklore. The purpose of this thesis was to study how hallucinations have impacted art. This study also includes an AR installation which is based on this written part of the thesis. The data for this thesis was found from various sources such as literature, journals and researches. Art history and modern art pioneers’ work such as Wassily Kandinsky, Yves Klein and Hilma Af Klint were considered. The study also deals with hallucination studies in the 50s, cave art, and religion as a part of art. The latest research have demonstrated that hallucinations are more common than we have been suggested. Although hallucinations are still a mystery for scientists, the mechanism of hallucinations is known. Studies of hallucinations in modern art lead inevitably to artists interest in esoteric and occultism. Studies indicate that the arts role as the creator of modern spiritualism is big. Theologian Christopher Partridge has created the term “occulture” to describe this late modern era. According to Partridge, there is a process underway that traditional religions have to make room for more spiritual culture. Nowadays artists’ interest in esoteric thinking has a great impact on further, it can be found everywhere from our popular culture, and it can be seen globally. However, not all artists necessarily relate their works with esotericism, but the subconscious can also be studied from the perspective of neuroscience. Developing VR, AR, MR, and IA technology gives new tools to explore the subconscious through art.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Glover, Jeffrey B.; Moss, Jessica; Rissolo, Dominique;
    Publisher: Universität Tübingen
    Country: Germany

    complete manuscript. These proceedings represent a selection of some of the excellent papers and posters presented at the 45th annual Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA) conference which was held in Atlanta, Georgia (USA). The theme of the conference, as reflected in the title of this volume, was “Digital Archaeologies, Material Worlds (Past and Present).” We chose this theme to highlight the varying ways in which digital archaeologies are now practiced and how these practices are leading to new and exciting ways to share our data with interested publics. The papers in this volume are divided into the following themes: GIS, Education and Dissemination, Databases and Collaborative Data Management, Networks and Modelling, and Virtual and Augmented Realities.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Emanuel, Jeffrey P.;
    Publisher: Universität Tübingen
    Country: Germany

    The combination of improved methods and tools, widespread adoption, and continuously-falling barriers to entry has prompted the claim that we are currently living in a ‘golden age of digital archaeology’. This paper provides a background discussion of the use and evolution of digital methods and tools in archaeology, as well as a summary of the conference session “From Physical to Digital, from Interactive to Immersive: Uses of Three– Dimensional Representation, Mixed Reality, and More in the Sharing and Exploration of Archaeological Data,” held at the CAA 2017 conference in Atlanta.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
20 Research products, page 1 of 2
  • Open Access Finnish
    Authors: 
    Nieminen, Topi;
    Country: Finland

    Uudet teknologiat otetaan vastaan usein tunneperäisesti, toiset ovat kiinnostuneita, toiset epäilevät. Uudet keksinnöt ja teknologiat oikein käytettyinä avaavat meille uuden maailman, tehostavat toimintoja, lisäävät luovuutta ja mahdollistavat asioita. Tämän työn tilaajat olivat sovelluskehitysyhteisö Viastar ja kulttuurialan toimija Carnivale. Tilaajia kiinnostavat uudet teknologiat kulttuuriperinnön sovelluksissa ja hankkeissa. Tämä kehittämistyö tutki ja tarkasteli, miten voimme paremmin hyödyntää uusia teknologioita sukututkimuksen apuna. Työssä tutkittiin, miten voimme yhdistää perinteisen ja DNA-analyysiin pohjautuvan sukututkimuksen. Tässä työssä käytiin myös läpi muita uusia teknologioita, joita voidaan hyödyntää sukuhistorian ja kulttuuriperinnön tallennuksessa, tutkimuksessa sekä myös yleisemmin kulttuurituotantojen tukena. Kehittämistyötä tehtiin tutkimalla ja kokeilemalla uusia teknologioita sekä käymällä läpi laajasti opinnäytetyön tekijän sukuun liittyviä sukututkimuksia ja niiden kautta esiin tullutta kulttuuriperintöä, vanhoja kuvia, karttoja ja paikkoja. Geneettisen sukututkimuksen avulla tutkittiin isä- ja äitilinjoja eri tekniikoilla ja jäljitettiin eri sukujen kulkureittejä menneiden vuosisatojen aikoina. Tässä opinnäytetyössä analysoitiin tekijän omasta suvusta teetettyjen DNA-testien tuloksia ja osoitettiin, miten ne toimivat käytännössä sukututkimuksen välineinä. Tässä työssä käsiteltyjä muita kulttuurituotannon tekniikoita olivat drone-kuvaus, lidar-kuvaus, virtuaali- ja lisätty todellisuus. Tutkimusmenetelminä käytettiin aineistotutkimusta, DNA-testejä, havainnointia, haastattelua ja kenttätyötä kokeilemalla käytännössä erilaisissä ympäristöissä uusia teknisiä välineitä. Työn tuloksina todettiin, että uudet tekniikat toimivat sukututkimuksessa ja kulttuuriperinnön tallentamisessa erittäin hyvin. Uudet tekniikat avaavat uusia sisältöjä ja osallistavat kulttuurin tuottajan sekä kuluttajan tuotantoihin syvällisesti. Toimenpide-ehdotuksena esitettiin, että sukututkimuksessa ja kulttuurituotannoissa otettaisiin rohkeasti uusia tekniikoita laajasti käyttöön toiminnan parantamiseksi ja tehostamiseksi. New technologies are often embraced emotionally: others show interest and others doubt. It is a fact that new inventions and technologies, when used properly, open up new worlds for us, streamline operations, increase creativity and enable things. This thesis was commissioned by the application development company Viastar and the cultural sector enterprise Carnivale. Both commissioners are interested in new technologies on cultural heritage applications and projects. The objective of this study was to explore and examine how new technologies can better be utilized in genealogy. The study explored how to combine traditional and genetic genealogy research. It also reviewed some other new innovative technologies that can be used on cultural heritage research and in cultural productions. The study was carried out by exploring and experimenting new technologies and going through extensive genealogy and cultural heritage materials, old images, maps, and places that have emerged through genealogy research. In terms of genetic genealogy, lineages have been studied using different DNA techniques and the pathways of different genera have been traced over the past centuries. The study analyzed the DNA research results from the author's own lineage and show how they work in practice as a tool for genealogy. Other cultural production techniques covered in this study include drone imaging, lidar imaging, as well as virtual and augmented reality. The research methods used were document analysis, observation, interview and fieldwork by experimenting new technical tools in different environments. The results indicate that the new technologies work very well in genealogy and in saving cultural heritage. New technologies open up new content and deeply involve producers, researchers and cultural consumers in productions. The thesis proposes that genealogists and cultural sector make widespread use of new technologies to improve and increase their efficiency.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Muller, Julien (AHP);
    Publisher: Université de Lorraine

    Ce jeu de données contient des données enrichies sur les membres du Bureau des longitudes, de la création de cette institution scientifique en 1795, jusqu'à 1970 (pour la dernière date d'entrée).

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rosson, Lois Ruby;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    This dissertation examines how the practice of astronomical illustration changed and expanded over the course of the twentieth century Space Age. In the United States, the post-war period transformed outer space into a geopolitically significant environment, reorienting the authoritative picturing of space from a practice housed primarily within European astronomical observatories to one with commercial viability in American science and popular culture. In the absence of cameras capable of rendering the space environment, individual illustrators filled in pictorial gaps by hand. Between the years of 1944 and 1987, illustrators developed an aesthetic of neutrality that visually signaled the scientific accuracy of their work. This aesthetic privileged a style of representation that mirrored the technical impartiality of cameras, collapsing distinctions between “most realistic” looking with “most photographic.” The visual clarity of photographic resolution became the standard for the most successful illustrations, even though most subjects depicted required a degree of artistic license to be made visible at all. This dissertation examines the visual techniques developed to reproduce photographic-looking illustrations of unphotographable places. The status of these images as utilitarian was negotiated via a complex web of group consensus and proximity to places like NASA, educational programming at planetariums, and public television. Examining midcentury astronomical illustration as a cultural product instead of neutral technical output offers a new entry point into the visual culture of the Space Age in the United States. This study underscores the way in which socially constructed expectations about the space environment were coded into objective-looking images.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    CSIC - Departamento de Comunicación;
    Publisher: Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (España)

    Head of Communication: Abel Grau; Editorial board: Esther M. García Pastor, Alejandro Parrilla García; Writers: Lucía Casas Piñeiro, Isidoro García Cano, Esther M. García Pastor, Carmen Fernández, Ana Iglesias, Mónica Lara del Vigo, Silbia López de Lacalle, Víctor Lloret Blackburn, Alejandro Parrilla García, Belén Remacha; Photography: César Hernández, Álvaro Muñoz Guzmán, Joan Costa, Artur Martínez y Pau Franch; Translation: Fabiola Barraclough. This special issue of ‘CSIC Investiga. Journal of Science’ shows the performance of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) within the EU R&D framewok programme Horizon 2020. It presents reportages on research projects about Qur’an heritage in Europe, the exploration of Mars, the new robots that assist people, more efficient parasites controls in fishery, new sustainable packaging, methods to trace asymptomatic tuberculosis transmisión, and the historic legacy of the Senegal’s region of Pathiana, among others. Peer reviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Tryfonos, George; Ioannides, Marinos; Anastasi, A. G.; Apostolou, V. A.; Pieri, P. P.; Koundouris, M. A.; Savva, F. G.;
    Country: Cyprus

    The paper presents a novel adaptive parametric documentation, modelling and sharing methodology, which aims to achieve a continuous holistic documentation, data processing and sharing process for cultural heritage community, such as architects, engineers, archaeologists, conservators, programmers, fabricators, contest creators, game developers, scholars and common citizens. Thus, the use of advance parametric and building information modelling software allows the processing and specification of all data by creating the 3D models needed for the multidisciplinary experts. Two Cypriot case studies from the medieval time period have been chosen for the development, and evaluation of our proposed methodology in order to investigate the process of modelling and sharing all the given metadata and 3D data. The first one is the Asinou Church, a UNESCO Heritage stone monument in the Troodos Mountains with a unique interior and the Kolossi Castle, a former Crusader stronghold on the west of the city of Limassol on the island of Cyprus.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lamanna, Giovanni; Bird, Ian; Petzold, Andreas; Asmi, Ari; Brus, Magdalena; Blomberg, Niklas; Räß, Michael; Dimper, Rudolf; Gotz, Andrew; Dekker, Ron;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | ESCAPE (824064), EC | PaNOSC (823852), EC | SSHOC (823782), EC | EOSC-Life (824087), EC | ENVRI-FAIR (824068)

    THE SCIENCE CLUSTERS are EU collaborative projects that were launched in 2019 to link ESFRI and other world-class Research Infrastructures (RIs) to the European Open Science Cloud (EOSC). The main impacts of the Science Clusters’ work programme concern: the improved access of researchers to data, tools and resources, leading to new insights and innovation for data-driven science both within and beyond the context of the domains in which the clusters are rooted; the creation of a cross-border open innovation environment for FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable) data management for economies of scale, to develop synergies and rise the efficiency and productivity of researchers through open-science standards and thematic services; the enhanced co-developments to foster the cross-domain interoperability central to the EOSC goal. The Science Clusters are an integral part of EOSC. Their services and outcomes are now forming the core of the emerging EOSC fabric. As important partners of EOSC, Science Clusters contribute to its development and its implementation process. Importantly, the Science Clusters form a natural collaboration between the ESFRI RIs’ management boards partners in the clusters. As EOSC matures and begins delivering data and services for European research, a discussion is needed to stimulate the Open Science practices, cross-domain interoperability and long-term coordination of the scientific communities covered by the five Science Clusters. This position paper contributes formally to explain the urgent need of EC to support a longer-term role of the five Science Clusters to provide content to the EOSC, to enhance researchers’ involvement in Open Science and to suggest potential cooperative pathways in the Horizon-Europe framework and along with the EOSC Association roadmap. This paper is aimed at highlighting: Expectations of the clusters and the concerned research communities, pointing out a common structured vision and a series of suggestions for the future. A more detailed analysis from each cluster, that is provided for completeness.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lamanna, Giovanni; Bird, Ian; Petzold, Andreas; Asmi, Ari; Brus, Magdalena; Blomberg, Niklas; Dimper, Rudolf; Gotz, Andrew; Dekker, Ron;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | EOSC-Life (824087), EC | ESCAPE (824064), EC | SSHOC (823782), EC | PaNOSC (823852), EC | ENVRI-FAIR (824068)

    THE SCIENCE CLUSTERS are EU collaborative projects that were launched in 2019 to link ESFRI and other world-class Research Infrastructures (RIs) to the European Open Science Cloud (EOSC). The main impacts of the Science Clusters’ work programme concern: the improved access of researchers to data, tools and resources, leading to new insights and innovation for data-driven science both within and beyond the context of the domains in which the clusters are rooted; the creation of a cross-border open innovation environment for FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable) data management for economies of scale, to develop synergies and rise the efficiency and productivity of researchers through open-science standards and thematic services; the enhanced co-developments to foster the cross-domain interoperability central to the EOSC goal. The Science Clusters are an integral part of EOSC. Their services and outcomes are now forming the core of the emerging EOSC fabric. As important partners of EOSC, Science Clusters contribute to its development and its implementation process. Importantly, the Science Clusters form a natural collaboration between the ESFRI RIs’ management boards partners in the clusters. As EOSC matures and begins delivering data and services for European research, a discussion is needed to stimulate the Open Science practices, cross-domain interoperability and long-term coordination of the scientific communities covered by the five Science Clusters. This position paper contributes formally to explain the urgent need of EC to support a longer-term role of the five Science Clusters to provide content to the EOSC, to enhance researchers’ involvement in Open Science and to suggest potential cooperative pathways in the Horizon-Europe framework and along with the EOSC Association roadmap. This paper is aimed at highlighting: Expectations of the clusters and the concerned research communities, pointing out a common structured vision and a series of suggestions for the future. A more detailed analysis from each cluster, that is provided for completeness.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Annola, Minna Susanna;
    Country: Finland

    Hallucinations are believed to be as old as the human’s brain. Usually, modern people relate to hallucinations in drugs or mental illness. Modern man may not think how great impact hallucinations have had on arts, religions, and folklore. The purpose of this thesis was to study how hallucinations have impacted art. This study also includes an AR installation which is based on this written part of the thesis. The data for this thesis was found from various sources such as literature, journals and researches. Art history and modern art pioneers’ work such as Wassily Kandinsky, Yves Klein and Hilma Af Klint were considered. The study also deals with hallucination studies in the 50s, cave art, and religion as a part of art. The latest research have demonstrated that hallucinations are more common than we have been suggested. Although hallucinations are still a mystery for scientists, the mechanism of hallucinations is known. Studies of hallucinations in modern art lead inevitably to artists interest in esoteric and occultism. Studies indicate that the arts role as the creator of modern spiritualism is big. Theologian Christopher Partridge has created the term “occulture” to describe this late modern era. According to Partridge, there is a process underway that traditional religions have to make room for more spiritual culture. Nowadays artists’ interest in esoteric thinking has a great impact on further, it can be found everywhere from our popular culture, and it can be seen globally. However, not all artists necessarily relate their works with esotericism, but the subconscious can also be studied from the perspective of neuroscience. Developing VR, AR, MR, and IA technology gives new tools to explore the subconscious through art.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Glover, Jeffrey B.; Moss, Jessica; Rissolo, Dominique;
    Publisher: Universität Tübingen
    Country: Germany

    complete manuscript. These proceedings represent a selection of some of the excellent papers and posters presented at the 45th annual Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA) conference which was held in Atlanta, Georgia (USA). The theme of the conference, as reflected in the title of this volume, was “Digital Archaeologies, Material Worlds (Past and Present).” We chose this theme to highlight the varying ways in which digital archaeologies are now practiced and how these practices are leading to new and exciting ways to share our data with interested publics. The papers in this volume are divided into the following themes: GIS, Education and Dissemination, Databases and Collaborative Data Management, Networks and Modelling, and Virtual and Augmented Realities.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Emanuel, Jeffrey P.;
    Publisher: Universität Tübingen
    Country: Germany

    The combination of improved methods and tools, widespread adoption, and continuously-falling barriers to entry has prompted the claim that we are currently living in a ‘golden age of digital archaeology’. This paper provides a background discussion of the use and evolution of digital methods and tools in archaeology, as well as a summary of the conference session “From Physical to Digital, from Interactive to Immersive: Uses of Three– Dimensional Representation, Mixed Reality, and More in the Sharing and Exploration of Archaeological Data,” held at the CAA 2017 conference in Atlanta.