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71,832 Research products, page 1 of 7,184

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
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  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Baroncini, Sofia; Sartini, Bruno; Daquino, Marilena;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    This folder contains the documentation of the study Do we all mean the same thing? (Un)Conventional usage of symbols in the Arts submitted to the Digital Humanities Conference (2023). It is constituted by 1) one Jupyter Notebook ("UnConventionalUsageSymbolsArts.ipynb") containing the analysis conducted, and 2) the data used for the analysis, namely an RDF dataset of art interpretations ("PanofskyOnlySymbSubgraphFinal.ttl") and JSON files of symbols and symbolic meanings extracted from the Knowledge Base HyperReal.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Coussement, Alexia; van Berckel Smit, Floris;
    Publisher: ECHER Blog
    Countries: Netherlands, Belgium
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Diakonova, Marina; Molina Sánchez, Luis; Mueller, Hannes; Pérez García, Javier José; Rauh, Cristopher;
    Publisher: Banco de España
    Country: Spain

    El hecho de que los episodios de disturbios y conflictos sociales, tensiones políticas e incertidumbre sobre las políticas económicas afectan a la evolución de la economía es comúnmente aceptado en Economía. Sin embargo, la dimensión en tiempo real de tales interacciones no ha sido tan estudiada, y en concreto no está claro cómo se incorporarían dichas tensiones en los modelos de predicción al uso. Esto puede explicarse en parte por la división entre las contribuciones de la ciencia económica y la ciencia política en esta área, así como por la tradicional falta de disponibilidad de indicadores de alta frecuencia que midan tales fenómenos. Sin embargo, esta restricción se está volviendo cada vez menos limitante, gracias a la construcción de indicadores basados en análisis textuales. En este trabajo reunimos un conjunto de datos de medidas de lo que llamamos «inestabilidad institucional» para tres economías emergentes representativas: Brasil, Colombia y México. Dichos indicadores se introducen en un modelo estándar de predicciones (MIDAS) para el PIB trimestral. Los resultados muestran que la introducción de los indicadores que captan la inestabilidad institucional mejora el pronóstico del PIB trimestral respecto al uso de un conjunto amplio de indicadores estándar macroeconómicos y financieros de alta frecuencia. It is widely accepted that episodes of social unrest, conflict, political tensions and policy uncertainty affect the economy. Nevertheless, the real-time dimension of such relationships is less studied, and it remains unclear how to incorporate them in a forecasting framework. This can be partly explained by a certain divide between the economic and political science contributions in this area, as well as by the traditional lack of availability of high-frequency indicators measuring such phenomena. The latter constraint, though, is becoming less of a limiting factor through the production of text-based indicators. In this paper we assemble a dataset of such monthly measures of what we call “institutional instability”, for three representative emerging market economies: Brazil, Colombia and Mexico. We then forecast quarterly GDP by adding these new variables to a standard macro-forecasting model in a mixed-frequency MIDAS framework. Our results strongly suggest that capturing institutional instability based on a broad set of standard high-frequency indicators is useful when forecasting quarterly GDP. We also analyse the relative strengths and weaknesses of the approach.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Reyes Ayala, Brenda; Du, Qiufeng; Han, Juyi;
    Country: Canada

    Presented at the Linked Archives 2022: International Workshop on Archives and Linked Data at the 26th International Conference on Theory and Practice of Digital Libraries (TPDL2022), Padua, Italy.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Beck, Jess;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    The Iberian Copper Age is a period dominated by the emergence of early complex societies. In sharp contrast with the preceding Neolithic, the Chalcolithic is characterized by agricultural intensification, population aggregation, political centralization and the appearance of ‘mega-villages’ on the landscape. Previous research has focused on the phenomenon of collective burial to suggest that these broad-scale social processes are underwritten by a ‘communally-organized society’. However the internal organization of such communities is still poorly understood, particularly because the taphonomy and social function of such collective burials are underexplored. At 113 ha in size, Marroquíes Bajos is one of the largest settlements known for the time period, and contains evidence of four different burial programs. This project’s bioarchaeological analysis of the mortuary variability at the site will allow for the investigation of whether Iberian Copper Age societies were collectively organized, or whether significant disparities in health, diet or material culture existed among the social units being represented in these burials Through osteological analysis, isotopic analysis of diet, AMS radiocarbon dating, and an archaeological analysis of tomb form and grave goods, my investigation at Marroquíes Bajos will allow for a more nuanced reconstruction of the ways in which Copper Age societies were organized, while deepening our understanding of how and why collective burials were used by prehistoric populations.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Mao, Bolin; Chu, Chenhui; Nakashima, Yuta; Nagahara, Hajime;
    Publisher: Institute of Economic Research, Kyoto University

    The efficient market hypothesis (EMH) plays a fundamental role in modern financial theory. Previous empirical studies have tested the weak and semi-strong forms of EMH with typical financial data, such as historical stock prices and annual earnings. However, few tests have been extended to include alternative data such as tweets. In this study, we use 1) two stock tweet datasets that have different features and 2) nine natural language processing (NLP)-based deep learning models to test the semi-strong form EMH in the United States stock market. None of our experimental results show that stock tweets with NLP-based models can prominently improve the daily stock price prediction accuracy compared with random guesses. Our experiment provides evidence that the semi-strong form of EMH holds in the United States stock market on a daily basis when considering stock tweet information with the NLP-based models.

  • Other research product . 2022
    Open Access English
    Publisher: oeaw
    Country: Austria
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jordaan, Jacqueline;
    Country: Canada

    Museums are sites of representation and contestation; especially in South Africa, where the representation of African peoples’ pasts are often found in Eurocentric oriented museums. Museums, as retainers of material culture could present alternative understandings of African peoples’ pasts, one not subject to a Eurocentric valorisation of the written word as the blueprint of development and complexity. To this point, the practice of archaeology and its potential contribution to public understandings of African peoples’ pasts become critical to African centring. Framed within a larger discussion of coloniality, I use qualitative methods to assess museum display themes across KwaZulu-Natal, colonial and apartheid narratives and reframing opportunities at the KwaZulu-Natal Museum, and the museum as a teaching resource. In this dissertation, I discuss de-linking strategies, such as the use of orality and museum educator orientation, which hold potential to create a humanism that expands African peoples’ contributions to the stories of humanity.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jensby, Matthew;
    Country: Canada

    Teeth are commonly excavated items among archaeological assemblages and provide key insights to the individual from which they develop. Specifically, dental enamel registers evidence of biorhythmic growth (and disruption) within the tooth crown morphology as enamel is deposited. The present research investigates evidence of systemic growth disruption among the molars of archaeological barren-ground caribou (Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus) excavated from the LdFa-1 site in southern Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada. This study is the first to examine Rangifer crowns from the inside-out, exploring both the internal composition of enamel and surface morphology. With minimal prior data available, the overall focus of this project is to begin establishing locational patterns and frequencies of developmental disruption observed among each molar type (M1-3). Examining growth disruption at the enamel surface is accomplished by generating a profile of each tooth using laser-scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) and assessed with two recently developed overlay techniques (a 6th order polynomial trendline and a spline curve) (Cares Henriquez and Oxenham 2020; Gamble and Milne 2018). Histological thin sections are then created and observed under polarized light to identify evidence of developmental disruption among the internal enamel matrices. A disruption event is represented by a dark line (accentuated stria of Retzius) where enamel secretion experienced abnormal pause. This study finds the spline curve to be a better fit for analyzing surface profiles via LSCM compared to 6th order polynomial, but the technique produces inaccurate evidence of enamel growth disruption. However, of 39 accentuated striae of Retzius terminating at the outer enamel surface, 23 could be associated with surface defects. This suggests that an LSCM spline curve may be a useful analytical tool for future research, but should only be applied as a supplemental approach to a more established method of identifying enamel growth defects (such as scoring accentuated striae of Retzius). This study incorporates such an approach to the present data, producing initial locational frequencies of surficial developmental disruption (referred to as linear enamel hypoplasia, or LEH) among Rangifer teeth. These trends are then interpreted based on general, yet highly synchronic caribou life-history patterns with potential to result in growth disruption.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Beck, Jess;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    In US popular culture, the word “archaeology” often conjures up images of buried treasure, ancient ruins, daring adventurers, and perhaps even dinosaurs or aliens. In reality, the discipline of archaeology is the study of the material traces of the human past. These traces include everything from human-made objects such as pottery, stone tools, and architecture, to animal bones, plant remains, and human skeletons. Rather than seeking out individual artifacts because of their aesthetic or monetary value (*cough, cough* Indiana Jones, *cough, cough*), archaeologists excavate and analyze artifacts and remains because they provide evidence of how past people lived and how ancient societies were organized. Archaeology is important because it allows us to access the entire scope of human history, from the Paleolithic to the present day, providing us with an understanding of what it means to be human across space and over time. This does not, however, mean that archaeology is a value- free discipline; instead, archaeological questions are shaped by history and culture. In this course, we will critically examine how archaeologists ask and answer questions about the human past, while exploring how their research is received in popular culture.