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90 Research products, page 1 of 9

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
  • Other research products
  • 2018-2022
  • Energy Research

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Moreno Bernal, Ángel Iván; Caminero García, María Teresa;
    Publisher: Banco de España
    Country: Spain

    La divulgación de información prudencial sobre los riesgos ambientales, sociales y de gobernanza (ASG) será obligatoria, a partir de junio de 2022, para las grandes empresas con valores negociados en un mercado regulado de cualquier Estado miembro. Este artículo trata de evaluar el grado de preparación de las entidades financieras europeas para este requerimiento mediante la aplicación de técnicas de minería de textos para analizar los informes prudenciales, comúnmente denominados informes de Pilar 3, correspondientes al período 2019-2020, de la mayoría de las entidades financieras significativas que están bajo la supervisión directa del BCE, con el fin de evaluar el nivel de concienciación de estas entidades en relación con la materialidad de los riesgos ASG. Al aplicar una sencilla taxonomía de términos basada en léxicos y expresiones regulares, mediante una herramienta que hemos desarrollado, somos capaces de identificar fragmentos relevantes con un alto nivel de precisión, a partir de la búsqueda de diferentes combinaciones de conceptos dentro de la taxonomía de términos. Los resultados indican que, aunque hay un mayor conocimiento de los riesgos ASG y se aprecia un aumento significativo en las instituciones más pequeñas (aquellas con activos por debajo de 30.000 millones de euros), el nivel de detalle incluido es generalmente bajo y la introducción de las nuevas divulgaciones obligatorias ASG debería tener un impacto significativo en el nivel de divulgación de información en esta área. Disclosure of prudential information on environmental, social and governance (ESG) risks will become mandatory from June, 2022 for large institutions with securities traded on a regulated market of any Member State. This paper tries to assess how prepared European financial institutions are for this requirement and applies text mining techniques to analyse the prudential reports, commonly referred to as Pillar 3 reports, for 2019 and 2020 of most of the significant banks under the ECB direct supervision in order to evaluate the level of awareness of these institutions in relation to the materiality of ESG risks. By applying a simple taxonomy of terms based on lexicons and regular expressions using a tool that we have developed, we are able to identify relevant excerpts with a high level of precision searching for different combinations of concepts within the taxonomy of terms. The results indicate that although there is an increased awareness of the ESG risks, with a significant increase in smaller institutions (those with less tan 30 billion in assets), the level of detail included is generally low and the introduction of the new ESG mandatory disclosures should have a significant impact on the level of disclosures in this area.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Scottish Government, Communities Analysis Division;
    Publisher: UK Data Service

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner. The Scottish House Condition Survey (SHCS) is the largest single housing research project in Scotland, and the only national survey to look at the physical condition of Scotland's homes as well as the experiences of householders. The survey started in 1991 and became continuous in 2003-04. From 2012 onwards, the survey was incorporated within the Scottish Household Survey (available from the UK Data Archive under GN 33333) and became one of its modules. The SHCS consists of an interview with householders and a physical inspection of the dwelling they occupy, which provides a picture of Scotland's occupied housing stock. It covers all types of households and dwellings across the country - whether owned or rented, flats or houses. The physical data about the dwelling is recorded by surveyors trained to collect detailed information on housing characteristics. This is combined with information about the household collected through the face to face interview. The result is a unique and powerful dataset for examining the condition and characteristics of Scotland's housing stock alongside the views and experience of the people living in those dwellings. Further information about the survey series, and links to publications, can be found on the Scottish Government's Scottish House Condition Survey webpages. Main Topics: The main topics include: housingfuel povertyenergy efficiencyAn ID variable is also provided to link this data to the Scottish Household Survey (available from the UK Data Archive under GN 33333). Multi-stage stratified random sample Surveyor property inspection Other Face-to-face interview: Computer-assisted (CAPI/CAMI)

  • English
    Authors: 
    Seager, J., George Washington University; Baird, S., George Washington University;
    Publisher: UK Data Service

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.Gender and Adolescence: Global Evidence (GAGE) is a nine-year (2015-2024) research programme, funded by UK Aid from the UK Department for International Development (DFID), that seeks to combine longitudinal data collection and a mixed-methods approach to fill this information gap in sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, and the Middle East and North Africa. In particular, GAGE seeks to understand the lives of adolescents in these particularly marginalised regions of the Global South, and to uncover ‘what works’ to support the development of their capabilities over the course of the second decade of life, when many of these individuals will go through key transitions such as finishing their education, starting to work, getting married and starting to have children.GAGE undertakes longitudinal research in eight countries in Africa (Ethiopia, Rwanda), Asia (Bangladesh, India, Nepal) and the Middle East (Jordan, Lebanon, Palestine). Sampling adolescent girls and boys aged between 10‐19‐year olds, the quantitative survey follows a global total of 18,000 adolescent girls and boys, and their caregivers and explores the effects that programme have on their lives. This is substantiated by in‐depth qualitative and participatory research with adolescents and their peers. Its policy and legal analysis work stream studies the processes of policy change that influence the investment in and effectiveness of adolescent programming. In each country, there will be a baseline, midline, and endline study. For the baseline study, GAGE will administer a household questionnaire to a sample of adolescents and their female and male adult caregivers to collect information on key aspects of their lives. In addition, GAGE will administer a community questionnaire in the communities of these adolescent to understand their access to health services, education, and exposure to gender norms. The information for the household questionnaire will be obtained by approaching households and collecting detailed information from respondents. The information for the community questionnaire will be obtained by approaching a key community informant, including a Headman, health clinic worker, and primary school teacher or school administrator in the community. Currently only baseline surveys for Bangladesh (SN 8594), Ethiopia (SN 8597) and Nepal (SN 8702) are available from the UK Data Service.Further information, including publications, can be found on the Overseas Development Institute GAGE website. The main purpose of Gender and Adolescence: Global Evidence: Bangladesh Chittagong-Sylhet Cross Section, 2018 was to gather information on the lives of school-going adolescents living in nine districts across the Chittagong (Brahmnbaria, Chandpur, Chittagong, Cox's Bazar, and Rangamati districts) and Sylhet (Habiganj, Maulvibazaar, Sunamgani, and Sylhet districts) divisions of Bangladesh. The sample primarily comprised of school-going adolescents attending grade 6 in 2018, across 132 schools. This included a purposeful sample of adolescents who had dropped out of school and of adolescents with disabilities. In addition to adolescents, interviews were conducted with the adult female caregiver (1,747 surveys) and, for about a third of the adolescents, an adult male caregiver (449 surveys). Further information about the research site, sample selection, and data collection process is available in the documentation. Main Topics: The Adult Female (AF) dataset contains information about the adult female and the household, including the household roster; family background; durable goods; dwelling characteristics; household activities; investments in children and parenting; disability and functioning; time allocation; role in household decision making; access to productive capital; access to credit; financial inclusion and economic empowerment; information and communication technologies; health and nutrition; attitudes to equality; mobility; voice and agency; social inclusion; marriage and relationships; fertility; and social norms.The Core Respondent (CR) dataset contains data from the survey administered to the core respondent (school-going adolescent attending grade 6) and covers education; time allocation; paid work; health and nutrition; physical functioning; physical health; communication and comprehension; emotions, behaviour and relationships; illness and injuries; nutritional knowledge; psychosocial and mental health; mobility, voice and agency; social inclusion and economic empowerment; information and communication technologies; marriage and relationships; and fertility.The Adult Male (AM) dataset contains information on the adult male in the subset of households where surveys were conducted with adult males, covering investments in children and parenting; time allocation; information and communication technologies; health and nutrition; attitudes; social norms; and social inclusion. Simple random sample Face-to-face interview: Computer-assisted (CAPI/CAMI)

  • English
    Authors: 
    University of Essex, Institute for Social and Economic Research;
    Publisher: UK Data Service

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.Understanding Society, (UK Household Longitudinal Study), which began in 2009, is conducted by the Institute for Social and Economic Research (ISER) at the University of Essex and the survey research organisations Kantar Public and NatCen. It builds on and incorporates, the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS), which began in 1991. The Understanding Society Spending Study 2 was conducted by the Institute for Social and Economic Research (ISER) at the University of Essex. The purpose of the study was to test ways to increase participation in mobile data collection. The study comprised two separate sample groups: adult sample members of the Understanding Society Innovation Panel (see SN 6849) and members of the Lightspeed UK Online Access Panel. Respondents in both sample groups were invited to download an app on their smartphone to provide daily updates on their spending for 31 days. Those who did not download the app were invited to complete a daily browser-based online diary. Data for the Innovation Panel sample were collected between May 2018 and February 2019. Data for the Lightspeed UK Online Access Panel sample were collected between July 2018 and January 2019.Further information about the Spending Study, including links to publications and documents, can be found on the ISER Understanding household finance through better measurement webpage. Main Topics: Household expenditure; Survey methods experiment. Convenience sample Multi-stage stratified random sample Self-administered questionnaire: Web-based (CAWI) Mobile app-based data collection

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    English
    Authors: 
    Elsas, Ralf; Falck, Oliver; Winter, Joachim;
    Publisher: LMU-ifo Economics & Business Data Center (EBDC)

    Das EBDC Business Expectations Panel, BEP, besteht aus den wichtigsten Variablen des ifo Konjunkturtests und den entsprechenden Bilanzdaten aus den Unternehmensdatenbanken Amadeus (Bureau van Dijk) und Hoppenstedt (Hoppenstedt Firmeninformationen GmbH). Der ifo Konjunkturtest wird monatlich vom ifo Institut erhoben. Er setzt sich aus den EInzelerhebungen für die Sektoren Bau, Dienstleister, Handel und Verarbeitendes Gewerbe zusammen. Kern des Fragenprogramms sind qualitative Urteile zu aktuellen ökonomischen Parametern der Unternehmen wie z.B. der allgemeinen Situation, dem Umsatz, der Nachfrage, Kreditrestriktionen oder den Beschäftigten sowie Fragen zu den Entwicklungen in den kommenden Monaten, u.a. den Geschäfts-, Beschäftigten- oder Preiserwartungen. Die Bilanzdaten der Unternehmensdatenbanken wurden mit Hilfe der Programms Matching-Software MTB (Merge Toolbox), welche am „Center for quantitative Methods and Survey Research“ der Universität Konstanz entwickelt wurde dazu gespielt. The EBDC Business Expectations Panel, BEP, consists of the main variables of the ifo Business Survey and the corresponding balance sheet data from firm databases Amadeus (Bureau vanDijk) and Hoppenstedt(Hoppenstedt Information GmbH).The ifo Business Survey has been conducted by the ifo Institute on a monthly basis. The core of the questionnaire consists of qualitative assessments on the current economic parameters of companies such as, for example, the general situation, turnover, demand, credit constraints and staff numbers, as well as questions on trends in the forthcoming months in areas like business, employment and price expectations. The financial variables were merged by using the matching software MTB (Merge Toolbox) developed at the Center for Quantitative Methods and Survey Research of the University of Konstanz. Self-administered questionnaire

  • Other research product . 2022
    Authors: 
    Scottish Government, Communities Analysis Division;

    The Scottish House Condition Survey (SHCS) is the largest single housing research project in Scotland, and the only national survey to look at the physical condition of Scotland's homes as well as the experiences of householders. The survey started in 1991 and became continuous in 2003-04. From 2012 onwards, the survey was incorporated within the Scottish Household Survey (available from the UK Data Archive under GN 33333) and became one of its modules. The SHCS consists of an interview with householders and a physical inspection of the dwelling they occupy, which provides a picture of Scotland's occupied housing stock. It covers all types of households and dwellings across the country - whether owned or rented, flats or houses. The physical data about the dwelling is recorded by surveyors trained to collect detailed information on housing characteristics. This is combined with information about the household collected through the face to face interview. The result is a unique and powerful dataset for examining the condition and characteristics of Scotland's housing stock alongside the views and experience of the people living in those dwellings. Further information about the survey series, and links to publications, can be found on the Scottish Government's Scottish House Condition Survey webpages. The main topics include: housingfuel povertyenergy efficiencyAn ID variable is also provided to link this data to the Scottish Household Survey (available from the UK Data Archive under GN 33333). Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner. Main Topics:

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Davis, Scott (University of Groningen);
    Publisher: DataverseNL

    Fieldwork for Scottish Case study. Collection of in-depth interviews and accompanying participants power relation diagrams. Data related to the above publication.

  • Authors: 
    Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The English Housing Survey (EHS) is a continuous national survey commissioned by the Ministry of Housing, Community and Local Government (MHCLG) that collects information about people's housing circumstances and the condition and energy efficiency of housing in England. The EHS brings together two previous survey series into a single fieldwork operation: the English House Condition Survey (EHCS) (available from the UK Data Archive under GN 33158) and the Survey of English Housing (SEH) (available under GN 33277). The EHS covers all housing tenures. The information obtained through the survey provides an accurate picture of people living in the dwelling, and their views on housing and their neighbourhoods. The survey is also used to inform the development and monitoring of the Ministry's housing policies. Results from the survey are also used by a wide range of other users including other government departments, local authorities, housing associations, landlords, academics, construction industry professionals, consultants, and the general public. The EHS has a complex multi-stage methodology consisting of two main elements; an initial interview survey of around 12,000 households and a follow-up physical inspection. Some further elements are also periodically included in or derived from the EHS: for 2008 and 2009, a desk-based market valuation was conducted of a sub-sample of 8,000 dwellings (including vacant ones), but this was not carried out from 2010 onwards. A periodic follow-up survey of private landlords and agents (the Private Landlords Survey (PLS)) is conducted using information from the EHS interview survey. Fuel Poverty datasets are also available from 2003, created by the Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC). The EHS interview survey sample formed part of the Integrated Household Survey (IHS) (available from the Archive under GN 33420) from April 2008 to April 2011. During this period the core questions from the IHS formed part of the EHS questionnaire. End User Licence and Special Licence Versions: From 2014 data onwards, the End User Licence (EUL) versions of the EHS will only include derived variables. In addition the number of variables on the new EUL datasets has been reduced and disclosure control increased on certain remaining variables. New Special Licence versions of the EHS will be deposited later in the year, which will be of a similar nature to previous EHS EUL datasets and will include derived and raw datasets. Further information about the EHS and the latest news, reports and tables can be found on the GOV.UK English Housing Survey web pages. The EHS Housing survey consists of two components. Interview survey on the participating household - An interview is first conducted with the householder. The interview topics include: household characteristics, satisfaction with the home and the area, disability and adaptations to the home, ownership and rental details and income details. All interviewees are guaranteed confidentiality and all data is anonymised. Physical survey on the housing Stock - Where interviews were achieved (the ‘full household sample’), each year all rented properties and a sub-sample of owner occupied properties are regarded as eligible for the physical survey and the respondent’s consent is sought. A proportion of vacant properties were also sub-sampled. For all physical survey cases, a visual inspection of both the interior and exterior of the dwelling is carried out by a qualified surveyor to assess the condition and energy efficiency of the dwelling. Topics covered include whether the dwelling meets the Decent Homes Standard; cost to make the dwelling decent; existence of damp and Category 1 Hazards as measured by the Housing Health and Safety Rating System (HHSRS); Energy Efficiency Rating. This dataset contains data from the households who have taken part in both the interview and physical surveys as well as physical survey data on a random sample of vacant dwellings identified by the interviewer. Further information about the EHS 2019-2020 can be found in the GOV.UK English Housing Survey 2019 to 2020: headline report. Main Topics:

  • Authors: 
    Fouquet, R, London School of Economics and Political Science;

    CCCEP was established in October 2008 with the aim of advancing public and private action on climate change through rigorous, innovative research. There are a number of papers in this project that used or generated new data. These empirical papers are descriptive or econometric studies focusing predominantly on energy transitions and energy service consumption over the long run and use a host of economic and historical data.CCCEP was established in October 2008 with the aim of advancing public and private action on climate change through rigorous, innovative research. Even though much of our research is ongoing, we have made several major academic contributions: - Improving understanding of the uncertainties in climate models, developing state-of-the-art economic models of decision-making under uncertainty and applying them to climate change, and pursuing novel methods of participatory assessment/modelling. - Exploring different routes to a global climate agreement and alternatives to state-based governance, all the time emphasising the role of institutions. - Advancing knowledge on the potential for climate-friendly forms of development, and development-friendly forms of adaptation. We have advanced new integrated methodologies for identifying adaptation priorities, including 'vulnerability hotspots'. - Conducting interdisciplinary research on interventions towards a low-carbon economy, including robust econometric evaluation of the impacts of existing policies, analysis of carbon markets that bridges theory and practice, and an examination of the roles of states and markets. - Developing new methodologies bridging the gap between macro-scale simulation modelling and micro-scale, context-specific approaches. To build research capacity, we have strengthened the links between key disciplines and the climate debate, trained over 50 PhD students and provided new university courses at all levels. We have actively engaged with key decision-makers at all stages of the research process, influencing the UN climate negotiations at a high level, working closely with the World Bank and other international organisations, engaging heavily in UK climate policy on critical issues such as the fourth statutory carbon budget, impacting on policy-making in many other countries and engaging with private decision-makers, e.g. through our collaboration with Munich Re. We have also secured c. £28 millon in leveraged funding. Extensive consultations have highlighted the need to address the financial crisis/downturn, the continuing absence of a comprehensive international climate treaty, and recent controversies on climate science. They have stressed the need for more integrated approaches to climate research, to continue making a distinctive contribution in the context of other climate research, and to contribute to ESRC Strategic Priorities. Our five research themes for Phase Two are: 1. Understanding green growth and climate-compatible development: what could constitute green growth or climate-compatible development in industrialised and developing countries? 2. Advancing climate finance and investment: how can we unlock major flows of finance into both adaptation and mitigation in different contexts? What are the implications of such flows? 3. Evaluating the performance of climate policies: how can we assess the performance of different climate policies and how can we understand the scope for policy learning? 4. Managing climate risks and uncertainties and strengthening climate services: how can we promote new approaches to the assessment, management and communication of climate risks/uncertainties? 5. Enabling rapid transitions in mitigation and adaptation: how can we understand the scope for rapid transitions to dramatically cut emissions and adapt to significant climate change? Beyond the planned scientific programme, we propose to a CCCEP Innovation Fund with the aim of stimulating, developing and disseminating innovative ideas from both the academic and practitioner communities. Our plans for Phase Two build on the solid institutional foundations of Phase One, including CCCEP's position at LSE/Leeds, its management structure and its key staff. However, we also plan to refresh the team. We will continue to engage with key stakeholders throughout the research process and to exploit a range of pathways to impact.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Fouquet, R, London School of Economics and Political Science;
    Publisher: UK Data Service

    CCCEP was established in October 2008 with the aim of advancing public and private action on climate change through rigorous, innovative research. There are a number of papers in this project that used or generated new data. These empirical papers are descriptive or econometric studies focusing predominantly on energy transitions and energy service consumption over the long run and use a host of economic and historical data.CCCEP was established in October 2008 with the aim of advancing public and private action on climate change through rigorous, innovative research. Even though much of our research is ongoing, we have made several major academic contributions: - Improving understanding of the uncertainties in climate models, developing state-of-the-art economic models of decision-making under uncertainty and applying them to climate change, and pursuing novel methods of participatory assessment/modelling. - Exploring different routes to a global climate agreement and alternatives to state-based governance, all the time emphasising the role of institutions. - Advancing knowledge on the potential for climate-friendly forms of development, and development-friendly forms of adaptation. We have advanced new integrated methodologies for identifying adaptation priorities, including 'vulnerability hotspots'. - Conducting interdisciplinary research on interventions towards a low-carbon economy, including robust econometric evaluation of the impacts of existing policies, analysis of carbon markets that bridges theory and practice, and an examination of the roles of states and markets. - Developing new methodologies bridging the gap between macro-scale simulation modelling and micro-scale, context-specific approaches. To build research capacity, we have strengthened the links between key disciplines and the climate debate, trained over 50 PhD students and provided new university courses at all levels. We have actively engaged with key decision-makers at all stages of the research process, influencing the UN climate negotiations at a high level, working closely with the World Bank and other international organisations, engaging heavily in UK climate policy on critical issues such as the fourth statutory carbon budget, impacting on policy-making in many other countries and engaging with private decision-makers, e.g. through our collaboration with Munich Re. We have also secured c. £28 millon in leveraged funding. Extensive consultations have highlighted the need to address the financial crisis/downturn, the continuing absence of a comprehensive international climate treaty, and recent controversies on climate science. They have stressed the need for more integrated approaches to climate research, to continue making a distinctive contribution in the context of other climate research, and to contribute to ESRC Strategic Priorities. Our five research themes for Phase Two are: 1. Understanding green growth and climate-compatible development: what could constitute green growth or climate-compatible development in industrialised and developing countries? 2. Advancing climate finance and investment: how can we unlock major flows of finance into both adaptation and mitigation in different contexts? What are the implications of such flows? 3. Evaluating the performance of climate policies: how can we assess the performance of different climate policies and how can we understand the scope for policy learning? 4. Managing climate risks and uncertainties and strengthening climate services: how can we promote new approaches to the assessment, management and communication of climate risks/uncertainties? 5. Enabling rapid transitions in mitigation and adaptation: how can we understand the scope for rapid transitions to dramatically cut emissions and adapt to significant climate change? Beyond the planned scientific programme, we propose to a CCCEP Innovation Fund with the aim of stimulating, developing and disseminating innovative ideas from both the academic and practitioner communities. Our plans for Phase Two build on the solid institutional foundations of Phase One, including CCCEP's position at LSE/Leeds, its management structure and its key staff. However, we also plan to refresh the team. We will continue to engage with key stakeholders throughout the research process and to exploit a range of pathways to impact. These empirical papers are descriptive or econometric studies focusing predominantly on energy transitions and energy service consumption over the long run and use a host of economic and historical data.