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  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Trentacoste, A; Lodwick, L;
    Publisher: University of Oxford
    Country: United Kingdom

    Supplemental tables to Trentacoste, A. and Lodwick, L. (2023) Towards an agroecology of the Roman expansion: Republican agriculture and animal husbandry in context. In S. Bernard, L. Mignone and D. Padilla Peralta (eds), Making the Middle Republic: New Approaches to Rome and Italy, 400-200 BCE. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. The above chapter argues for the importance of farming regimes as a force that shaped Roman social and economic history, and it provides a first step towards an agroecology of the Roman expansion. It presents a new synthesis of archaeobotanical and zooarchaeological data from first-millennium BC Italy integrated with wider evidence for agricultural processing and rural production. Results indicate that production was motivated more by regional trajectories than by Roman political annexation, and that rural settlement changes did not have a major immediate impact on the bioarchaeological data considered. The paper discusses the socio-economic implications of these conclusions. Lastly, the chapter highlights key points of change alongside pathways for future research. The data analysed in the paper are contained in the attached supplemental tables, which summarise archaeobotanical and zooarchaeological data collected from published sources. Bibliographic details are included in the supplements. SuppTable01_Archbot: Supplemental Table 1, Archaeobotanical remains - presence/absence of archaeobotanical remains by site. Tenth century BC to first century AD. SuppTable02_Zooarch: Supplemental Table 2, Zooarchaeological remains - relative percentages of cattle, sheep/goat, and pigs by site. Quantified using NISP (Number of identified specimens). Middle Bronze Age to first century AD. This data is published open access to facilitate re-use. Please cite the chapter and the dataset if you use this data.

  • Research data . Image . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Fort, Molly; Gibson, Adam;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | IPERION HS (871034), UKRI | Multimodal hyperspectral,... (2579355)

    The following data sets were collected to support the potential uses of opensource data in the context of digital humanities and heritage sciences. Photographs X-Ray Fluorescence Hyperspectral Imaging Multispectral Imaging This proposed experiment is conducted by the UCL Institute for Sustainable Heritage in collaboration with the Centre for Digital Humanities. Imaging methods including Photography, Multispectral Imaging, Hyperspectral Imaging and Xray Fluorescence Mapping have been collected along with the complete readout metadata of the instrumentation. We have collected this as an example of typical, unprocessed imaging datasets that would be found in standard image conditions. This data is not optimized, nor do we claim it to be perfect quality, our aim is to provide users with access to a range of imaging data sets. We have included the data with minimum processing, as it is read straight from our systems, with the accompanying metadata provided from capture alone. We hope that you find the data helpful, and we welcome you to use the data in any way you wish, for all and any analysis development purposes. For us to build upon this research, we ask that in return you would be willing to share in some regard your experiences in using open-source data, using our data, successes and issues. If you would be willing to engage with us in this endeavor, please feel free to contact us so that we may be able to follow up with you. E: molly.fort.21@ucl.ac.uk Object Paradata; Postcard – c. Early 1900's Language – Eng. Materials – colour print on card, metallic leafing. Front transcription - ‘Greetings’ ‘May your Birthday bring you Peace & perfect Happiness, Golden hopes & Love of Friends, And every Happiness this world can send.’ Object Dimensions – 138mm X 88mm The postcard is an item of ephemera donated to the UCLDH Digitisation Suite by Prof Melissa Terras, for teaching and training purposes in 2015.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Trentacoste, A;
    Publisher: University of Oxford
    Country: United Kingdom

    This dataset contains Online Supplements with zooarchaeological data from The Place of Palms at Aphrodisias. It supports the chapter: Trentacoste, A. (forthcoming) Faunal Remains from the Late Antique to Ottoman Periods. In Wilson, A. I. and Russell, B., The ‘Place of Palms’: An Urban Park at Aphrodisias. Results of The Mica and Ahmet Ertegün South Agora Pool Project. Reichert Verlag, Wiesbaden. The above chapter presents a zooarchaeological analysis of the faunal material from The Place of Palms, including figures, tables, discussion, and regional contextualisation. This online dataset contains supplemental materials relevant to this study: a full description of the recording methodology, the recorded faunal assemblage data, and summary tables with information on skeletal element abundance (quantified through the minimum number of elements (MNE) / minimum animal units (MAU)) and bone fusion. Full details on the recording methodology are given in Supplement 1, which also contains a description of the organisation of the data table containing the recorded faunal assemblage. Supplement 2 contains the complete faunal assemblage in tabular format, including measurements. Body part distribution for the main taxa with MNE and MAU counts is presented in Supplements 3–5. Bone fusion is quantified in Supplements 6–9. These tables are presented online to save space in the printed volume and to facilitate re-use. About zooarchaeological analysis at Aphrodisias: Faunal remains were excavated between 2012 and 2017 from ‘The Place of Palms’, an area within the urban centre of Aphrodisias, defined by a massive monumental pool. The pool functioned from its construction in the first century AD into Late Antiquity. With the decline of the late antique city, the pool was no longer maintained, and, from the seventh century AD, its basin progressively became filled by dumped materials and sedimentation. By the fifteenth century AD the basin of the pool was completely covered by siltation and sediment run-off, and an Ottoman village came to occupy the site. Animal remains were recovered from throughout this chronology, from Imperial Roman to modern times. As the first systemic analysis of faunal material from Aphrodisias for the Late Antique and later periods, this zooarchaeologial study focused on general patterns of animal exploitation over the long chronology of the assemblage. Faunal material was hand collected, save for a few contexts which were subject to flotation. The majority of the material came from Ottoman deposits (c. 1500 specimens identified to taxon and element). Late Antique contexts were also well represented (c. 600 specimens identified to taxon and element). The total number of quantified specimens (identified to taxon and element) was just over 2400. In addition to new data on the Ottoman period, notable finds include the disarticulated remains of at least seven Late Antique equids, an abundance of turtles (Mauremys sp.) found in Byzantine pool deposits, a series of rough Late Antique bone tools, possibly used as scrapers, and evidence for suid – especially wild boar – consumption in Ottoman times. For further details see the volume and chapter cited above. Links and related references: - http://aphrodisias.classics.ox.ac.uk/excsouthagora.html - Wilson, A., Russell, B., and Ward, A. 2016. ‘Excavations in an urban park (“South Agora”), 2012’ in R.R.R. Smith, J. Lenaghan, A. Sokolicek and K. Welch (eds.), Aphrodisias Papers 5: Excavation and Research at Aphrodisias, 2006-2012, Portsmouth, RI: Journal of Roman Archaeology Supplement 103, 77-90. - Robinson, M. 2016. 'The environmental archaeology of the South Agora Pool, Aphrodisias' in Smith R.R.R. Smith, J. Lenaghan, A. Sokolicek and K. Welch (eds) Aphrodisias Papers 5: Excavation and Research at Aphrodisias, 2006-2012, Portsmouth, RI: Journal of Roman Archaeology Supplement 103, 91-99 - Wilson, A. (2019). ‘Aphrodisias in the long sixth century’, in I. Jacobs and H. Elton (eds), Asia Minor in the Long Sixth Century: Current Research and Future Directions. Oxford: Oxbow Books, 197–221.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Arana-Catania, Miguel; Kochkina, Elena; Zubiaga, Arkaitz; Liakata, Maria; Procter, Rob; He, Yulan;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: UKRI | Learning from COVID-19: A... (EP/V048597/1)

    The peer-reviewed publication for this dataset has been presented in the 2022 Annual Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics (NAACL), and can be accessed here: https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.02596. Please cite this when using the dataset. This dataset contains a heterogeneous set of True and False COVID claims and online sources of information for each claim. The claims have been obtained from online fact-checking sources, existing datasets and research challenges. It combines different data sources with different foci, thus enabling a comprehensive approach that combines different media (Twitter, Facebook, general websites, academia), information domains (health, scholar, media), information types (news, claims) and applications (information retrieval, veracity evaluation). The processing of the claims included an extensive de-duplication process eliminating repeated or very similar claims. The dataset is presented in a LARGE and a SMALL version, accounting for different degrees of similarity between the remaining claims (excluding respectively claims with a 90% and 99% probability of being similar, as obtained through the MonoT5 model). The similarity of claims was analysed using BM25 (Robertson et al., 1995; Crestani et al., 1998; Robertson and Zaragoza, 2009) with MonoT5 re-ranking (Nogueira et al., 2020), and BERTScore (Zhang et al., 2019). The processing of the content also involved removing claims making only a direct reference to existing content in other media (audio, video, photos); automatically obtained content not representing claims; and entries with claims or fact-checking sources in languages other than English. The claims were analysed to identify types of claims that may be of particular interest, either for inclusion or exclusion depending on the type of analysis. The following types were identified: (1) Multimodal; (2) Social media references; (3) Claims including questions; (4) Claims including numerical content; (5) Named entities, including: PERSON − People, including fictional; ORGANIZATION − Companies, agencies, institutions, etc.; GPE − Countries, cities, states; FACILITY − Buildings, highways, etc. These entities have been detected using a RoBERTa base English model (Liu et al., 2019) trained on the OntoNotes Release 5.0 dataset (Weischedel et al., 2013) using Spacy. The original labels for the claims have been reviewed and homogenised from the different criteria used by each original fact-checker into the final True and False labels. The data sources used are: - The CoronaVirusFacts/DatosCoronaVirus Alliance Database. https://www.poynter.org/ifcn-covid-19-misinformation/ - CoAID dataset (Cui and Lee, 2020) https://github.com/cuilimeng/CoAID - MM-COVID (Li et al., 2020) https://github.com/bigheiniu/MM-COVID - CovidLies (Hossain et al., 2020) https://github.com/ucinlp/covid19-data - TREC Health Misinformation track https://trec-health-misinfo.github.io/ - TREC COVID challenge (Voorhees et al., 2021; Roberts et al., 2020) https://ir.nist.gov/covidSubmit/data.html The LARGE dataset contains 5,143 claims (1,810 False and 3,333 True), and the SMALL version 1,709 claims (477 False and 1,232 True). The entries in the dataset contain the following information: - Claim. Text of the claim. - Claim label. The labels are: False, and True. - Claim source. The sources include mostly fact-checking websites, health information websites, health clinics, public institutions sites, and peer-reviewed scientific journals. - Original information source. Information about which general information source was used to obtain the claim. - Claim type. The different types, previously explained, are: Multimodal, Social Media, Questions, Numerical, and Named Entities. Funding. This work was supported by the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (grant no. EP/V048597/1, EP/T017112/1). ML and YH are supported by Turing AI Fellowships funded by the UK Research and Innovation (grant no. EP/V030302/1, EP/V020579/1). References - Arana-Catania M., Kochkina E., Zubiaga A., Liakata M., Procter R., He Y.. Natural Language Inference with Self-Attention for Veracity Assessment of Pandemic Claims. NAACL 2022 https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.02596 - Stephen E Robertson, Steve Walker, Susan Jones, Micheline M Hancock-Beaulieu, Mike Gatford, et al. 1995. Okapi at trec-3. Nist Special Publication Sp,109:109. - Fabio Crestani, Mounia Lalmas, Cornelis J Van Rijsbergen, and Iain Campbell. 1998. “is this document relevant?. . . probably” a survey of probabilistic models in information retrieval. ACM Computing Surveys (CSUR), 30(4):528–552. - Stephen Robertson and Hugo Zaragoza. 2009. The probabilistic relevance framework: BM25 and beyond. Now Publishers Inc. - Rodrigo Nogueira, Zhiying Jiang, Ronak Pradeep, and Jimmy Lin. 2020. Document ranking with a pre-trained sequence-to-sequence model. In Proceedings of the 2020 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing: Findings, pages 708–718. - Tianyi Zhang, Varsha Kishore, Felix Wu, Kilian Q Weinberger, and Yoav Artzi. 2019. Bertscore: Evaluating text generation with bert. In International Conference on Learning Representations. - Yinhan Liu, Myle Ott, Naman Goyal, Jingfei Du, Mandar Joshi, Danqi Chen, Omer Levy, Mike Lewis, Luke Zettlemoyer, and Veselin Stoyanov. 2019. Roberta: A robustly optimized bert pretraining approach. arXiv preprint arXiv:1907.11692. - Ralph Weischedel, Martha Palmer, Mitchell Marcus, Eduard Hovy, Sameer Pradhan, Lance Ramshaw, Nianwen Xue, Ann Taylor, Jeff Kaufman, Michelle Franchini, et al. 2013. Ontonotes release 5.0 ldc2013t19. Linguistic Data Consortium, Philadelphia, PA, 23. - Limeng Cui and Dongwon Lee. 2020. Coaid: Covid-19 healthcare misinformation dataset. arXiv preprint arXiv:2006.00885. - Yichuan Li, Bohan Jiang, Kai Shu, and Huan Liu. 2020. Mm-covid: A multilingual and multimodal data repository for combating covid-19 disinformation. - Tamanna Hossain, Robert L. Logan IV, Arjuna Ugarte, Yoshitomo Matsubara, Sean Young, and Sameer Singh. 2020. COVIDLies: Detecting COVID-19 misinformation on social media. In Proceedings of the 1st Workshop on NLP for COVID-19 (Part 2) at EMNLP 2020, Online. Association for Computational Linguistics. - Ellen Voorhees, Tasmeer Alam, Steven Bedrick, Dina Demner-Fushman, William R Hersh, Kyle Lo, Kirk Roberts, Ian Soboroff, and Lucy Lu Wang. 2021. Trec-covid: constructing a pandemic information retrieval test collection. In ACM SIGIR Forum, volume 54, pages 1–12. ACM New York, NY, USA.

  • Research data . 2022
    Open Access Divehi
    Authors: 
    Feener, R M; Daly, P; Ishikawa, N;
    Publisher: University of Oxford
    Country: United Kingdom

    The Maritime Asia Heritage Survey works to systematically inventory and document endangered tangible cultural heritage in the Maldives and Indonesia – including historical structures, archaeological sites, manuscripts and physical objects. The documentation produced in the course of our work includes site, feature, and object records with geospatial data, digital photography, LiDAR point clouds, orthophotomaps, 3D models, CAD site plans and architectural elevations, IIIF digitized manuscripts, and oral history video interviews The materials documented through this work are critically endangered, facing both natural and human threats. Our work thus creates a digital archive of multimedia source material for the history of the Indian Ocean world. All data is also made open-access available on our project website: https://maritimeasiaheritage.cseas.kyoto-u.ac.jp The Maritime Asia Heritage Survey is based at Kyoto University’s Center for Southeast Asian Studies. It is led by Prof. R. Michael Feener (PI and Director), together with Dr Patrick Daly (Co-PI) and Prof. Noboru Ishikawa (Co-PI). The project is financially supported by the Arcadia Fund, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin (project number 4309). The MAHS Digital Heritage Documentation Lab is hosted by the Kyoto University Center for Southeast Asian Studies. Work in the Maldives is done in partnership with the Maldives National Center for Cultural Heritage, Ministry of Arts, Culture and Heritage, and in Indonesia with the Directorate General of Culture, Ministry of Education, Culture, Research and Technology.

  • Research data . 2022
    Open Access Divehi
    Authors: 
    Feener, R M;
    Publisher: University of Oxford
    Country: United Kingdom

    The Maldives Heritage Survey aims to systematically inventory and document endangered tangible cultural heritage in the Maldives – including mosques, cemeteries, Buddhist temple ruins, and other historical structures and physical objects – through digital photography, laser scanning, 3D modelling, and GIS to create an open-access resource website and heritage database. The materials documented through this work are critically endangered, facing both natural and human threats that jeopardize the survival and accessibility of historical information for this vital node in pre-modern global economic and religious networks at the cross-roads of an interconnected Indian Ocean world. The project was led by Dr R. Michael Feener (Faculty of History / Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies) The Maldives Heritage Survey aims to systematically inventory and document endangered tangible cultural heritage in the Maldives – including mosques, cemeteries, Buddhist temple ruins, and other historical structures and physical objects – through digital photography, laser scanning, 3D modelling, and GIS to create an open-access resource website and heritage database. The materials documented through this work are critically endangered, facing both natural and human threats that jeopardize the survival and accessibility of historical information for this vital node in pre-modern global economic and religious networks at the cross-roads of an interconnected Indian Ocean world.

  • Authors: 
    Coulter, Matthew;
    Country: United Kingdom

    This dataset contains files supporting the figures published in the article 'Patterns of Communication during the 1241 Mongol Invasion of Europe: Insights from the Ottobeuren Collection'. The purpose of these figures is to provide network visualizations of the connections found in 1) the Ottobeuren letter collection (Innsbruck, Universitäts- und Landesbibliothek Tirol, Cod. 187, ff. 1v–8v), and 2) communication between actors involved in planning the defence of the Holy Roman Empire against the Mongols between approximately March and July 1241. The fileset includes the Gephi master file used to create the figures, CSV files containing raw data, and a README file. The data supporting these figures was compiled by the author first between September and November 2019, and then between March and November 2020, concurrently with the production of the article draft. It was revised in March 2021. This research was supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council under grant number 2280801, and by Masters funding from the Isaac Newton Trust and St John’s College, University of Cambridge.

  • Authors: 
    Ferraby, Rose; Millett, Martin; Dunbar, E; Evans, Jerry; Giorgi, John; Lucas, Jason; Mills, Phillip; Monteil, Gwladys; Powlesland, Dominic; Rackham, James; +3 more
    Publisher: Faculty of Classics
    Country: United Kingdom

    This record primarily consists of a spreadsheet with links to the files that constitute the data and other supporting information that detail the excavations in 2017. The main record for the Aldborough project is here: https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/275723 The collection relating to this particular dataset may be found at this URL: https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/335104; in addition, permanent links (DOIs) to the individual records (context sheets, find listings etc) are available in the attached spreadsheet. The Aldborough Roman Town Project was set up in 2009 by Dr Rose Ferraby and Prof. Martin Millett, Faculty of Classics, University of Cambridge. The project was designed to carry out archaeological research on the town of Isurium Brigantum, now the village of Aldborough in North Yorkshire, with an aim to better understanding its origins, development and its role in the social, political and economic scene of Roman Britain. This built upon a huge body of work already carried out by Colin Dobinson and volunteers from the Yorkshire Archaeological Society. Fieldwalking took place over large areas in and around the Roman town, as well as some small areas of geophysical survey. This data is all being brought together as part of the project. To begin with, the project will use geophysical survey to establish a landscape scale view of the sub-surface archaeological remains of the town, its defenses, road system and extra-mural areas. Already after only 3 years, this has revealed that Isurium Brigantium is far less straight forward than has previously presumed; rather the evidence collected so far suggests a much more complex picture of development, use and evolution into the Anglo-Saxon period. Once the survey is complete, excavation may take place to start to investigate some of the more complex areas of the town. A number of different geophysical techniques are being employed at the site, in order to better understand the various aspects of the archaeological record. Magnetometer and topographic surveys have been used across large areas of the town, whereas Ground Penetrating Radar has been used in limited areas with more complicated stratigraphy.

  • Authors: 
    Recchia, Gabriel; Jones, Ewan; Nulty, Paul; de Bolla, Peter; Regan, John;
    Publisher: Apollo - University of Cambridge Repository
    Country: United Kingdom

    This dataset consists of: $$ \ $$ I. Source code and documentation for the "Shared Lexis Tool", a Windows desktop application that provides a means of exploring all of the words that are statistically associated with a word provided by the user, in a given corpus of text (for certain predefined corpora), over a given date range. $$ \ $$ II. Source code and documentation for the "Coassociation Grapher", a Windows desktop application. Given a particular word of interest (a “focal token”) in a particular corpus of text, the Coassociation Grapher allows you to view the relative probability of observing other terms (“bound tokens”) before or after the focal token. $$ \ $$ III. Numerous precomputed files that need to be hosted on a webserver in order for the Shared Lexis Tool to function properly; $$ \ $$ IV. Files that were created in the course of conducting the research described in "Tracing shifting conceptual vocabularies through time" and "The idea of liberty" (full citations in above section 'SHARING/ACCESS INFORMATION'), including "cliques" (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clique_(graph_theory)) of words that frequently appear together; $$ \ $$ V. Source code of text-processing scripts developed by the Concept Lab, primarily for the purpose of generating precomputed files described in section III, and associated data. $$ \ $$ The Shared Lexis Tool and Coassociation Grapher (and the required precomputed files) are also being hosted at https://concept-lab.lib.cam.ac.uk/ from 2018 to 2023, and therefore those who are merely interested in using the tools within this time frame will have no use for the present dataset. However, these files may be useful for individuals who wish to host the files on their own webserver, for example, in order to use the Shared Lexis tool past 2023. See README.txt for more information. Foundation for the Future, DIGITAL KNOWLEDGE, RG74515

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Zhu, Lixing; He, Yulan; Zhou, Deyu;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: UKRI | Twenty20Insight (EP/T017112/1), UKRI | Turing AI Fellowship: Eve... (EP/V020579/1)

    topical_wordvec_models You first need to create a save folder for training. Download the [saved model](https://topicvecmodels.s3.eu-west-2.amazonaws.com/save/47/model) and place it in ./save/47/ to run the trained model. To construct the training set, refer to https://github.com/somethingx02/topical_wordvec_model please. Trained [wordvecs](https://topicvecmodels.s3.eu-west-2.amazonaws.com/save/47/aggrd_all_wordrep.txt).

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The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
169 Research products, page 1 of 17
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Trentacoste, A; Lodwick, L;
    Publisher: University of Oxford
    Country: United Kingdom

    Supplemental tables to Trentacoste, A. and Lodwick, L. (2023) Towards an agroecology of the Roman expansion: Republican agriculture and animal husbandry in context. In S. Bernard, L. Mignone and D. Padilla Peralta (eds), Making the Middle Republic: New Approaches to Rome and Italy, 400-200 BCE. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. The above chapter argues for the importance of farming regimes as a force that shaped Roman social and economic history, and it provides a first step towards an agroecology of the Roman expansion. It presents a new synthesis of archaeobotanical and zooarchaeological data from first-millennium BC Italy integrated with wider evidence for agricultural processing and rural production. Results indicate that production was motivated more by regional trajectories than by Roman political annexation, and that rural settlement changes did not have a major immediate impact on the bioarchaeological data considered. The paper discusses the socio-economic implications of these conclusions. Lastly, the chapter highlights key points of change alongside pathways for future research. The data analysed in the paper are contained in the attached supplemental tables, which summarise archaeobotanical and zooarchaeological data collected from published sources. Bibliographic details are included in the supplements. SuppTable01_Archbot: Supplemental Table 1, Archaeobotanical remains - presence/absence of archaeobotanical remains by site. Tenth century BC to first century AD. SuppTable02_Zooarch: Supplemental Table 2, Zooarchaeological remains - relative percentages of cattle, sheep/goat, and pigs by site. Quantified using NISP (Number of identified specimens). Middle Bronze Age to first century AD. This data is published open access to facilitate re-use. Please cite the chapter and the dataset if you use this data.

  • Research data . Image . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Fort, Molly; Gibson, Adam;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | IPERION HS (871034), UKRI | Multimodal hyperspectral,... (2579355)

    The following data sets were collected to support the potential uses of opensource data in the context of digital humanities and heritage sciences. Photographs X-Ray Fluorescence Hyperspectral Imaging Multispectral Imaging This proposed experiment is conducted by the UCL Institute for Sustainable Heritage in collaboration with the Centre for Digital Humanities. Imaging methods including Photography, Multispectral Imaging, Hyperspectral Imaging and Xray Fluorescence Mapping have been collected along with the complete readout metadata of the instrumentation. We have collected this as an example of typical, unprocessed imaging datasets that would be found in standard image conditions. This data is not optimized, nor do we claim it to be perfect quality, our aim is to provide users with access to a range of imaging data sets. We have included the data with minimum processing, as it is read straight from our systems, with the accompanying metadata provided from capture alone. We hope that you find the data helpful, and we welcome you to use the data in any way you wish, for all and any analysis development purposes. For us to build upon this research, we ask that in return you would be willing to share in some regard your experiences in using open-source data, using our data, successes and issues. If you would be willing to engage with us in this endeavor, please feel free to contact us so that we may be able to follow up with you. E: molly.fort.21@ucl.ac.uk Object Paradata; Postcard – c. Early 1900's Language – Eng. Materials – colour print on card, metallic leafing. Front transcription - ‘Greetings’ ‘May your Birthday bring you Peace & perfect Happiness, Golden hopes & Love of Friends, And every Happiness this world can send.’ Object Dimensions – 138mm X 88mm The postcard is an item of ephemera donated to the UCLDH Digitisation Suite by Prof Melissa Terras, for teaching and training purposes in 2015.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Trentacoste, A;
    Publisher: University of Oxford
    Country: United Kingdom

    This dataset contains Online Supplements with zooarchaeological data from The Place of Palms at Aphrodisias. It supports the chapter: Trentacoste, A. (forthcoming) Faunal Remains from the Late Antique to Ottoman Periods. In Wilson, A. I. and Russell, B., The ‘Place of Palms’: An Urban Park at Aphrodisias. Results of The Mica and Ahmet Ertegün South Agora Pool Project. Reichert Verlag, Wiesbaden. The above chapter presents a zooarchaeological analysis of the faunal material from The Place of Palms, including figures, tables, discussion, and regional contextualisation. This online dataset contains supplemental materials relevant to this study: a full description of the recording methodology, the recorded faunal assemblage data, and summary tables with information on skeletal element abundance (quantified through the minimum number of elements (MNE) / minimum animal units (MAU)) and bone fusion. Full details on the recording methodology are given in Supplement 1, which also contains a description of the organisation of the data table containing the recorded faunal assemblage. Supplement 2 contains the complete faunal assemblage in tabular format, including measurements. Body part distribution for the main taxa with MNE and MAU counts is presented in Supplements 3–5. Bone fusion is quantified in Supplements 6–9. These tables are presented online to save space in the printed volume and to facilitate re-use. About zooarchaeological analysis at Aphrodisias: Faunal remains were excavated between 2012 and 2017 from ‘The Place of Palms’, an area within the urban centre of Aphrodisias, defined by a massive monumental pool. The pool functioned from its construction in the first century AD into Late Antiquity. With the decline of the late antique city, the pool was no longer maintained, and, from the seventh century AD, its basin progressively became filled by dumped materials and sedimentation. By the fifteenth century AD the basin of the pool was completely covered by siltation and sediment run-off, and an Ottoman village came to occupy the site. Animal remains were recovered from throughout this chronology, from Imperial Roman to modern times. As the first systemic analysis of faunal material from Aphrodisias for the Late Antique and later periods, this zooarchaeologial study focused on general patterns of animal exploitation over the long chronology of the assemblage. Faunal material was hand collected, save for a few contexts which were subject to flotation. The majority of the material came from Ottoman deposits (c. 1500 specimens identified to taxon and element). Late Antique contexts were also well represented (c. 600 specimens identified to taxon and element). The total number of quantified specimens (identified to taxon and element) was just over 2400. In addition to new data on the Ottoman period, notable finds include the disarticulated remains of at least seven Late Antique equids, an abundance of turtles (Mauremys sp.) found in Byzantine pool deposits, a series of rough Late Antique bone tools, possibly used as scrapers, and evidence for suid – especially wild boar – consumption in Ottoman times. For further details see the volume and chapter cited above. Links and related references: - http://aphrodisias.classics.ox.ac.uk/excsouthagora.html - Wilson, A., Russell, B., and Ward, A. 2016. ‘Excavations in an urban park (“South Agora”), 2012’ in R.R.R. Smith, J. Lenaghan, A. Sokolicek and K. Welch (eds.), Aphrodisias Papers 5: Excavation and Research at Aphrodisias, 2006-2012, Portsmouth, RI: Journal of Roman Archaeology Supplement 103, 77-90. - Robinson, M. 2016. 'The environmental archaeology of the South Agora Pool, Aphrodisias' in Smith R.R.R. Smith, J. Lenaghan, A. Sokolicek and K. Welch (eds) Aphrodisias Papers 5: Excavation and Research at Aphrodisias, 2006-2012, Portsmouth, RI: Journal of Roman Archaeology Supplement 103, 91-99 - Wilson, A. (2019). ‘Aphrodisias in the long sixth century’, in I. Jacobs and H. Elton (eds), Asia Minor in the Long Sixth Century: Current Research and Future Directions. Oxford: Oxbow Books, 197–221.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Arana-Catania, Miguel; Kochkina, Elena; Zubiaga, Arkaitz; Liakata, Maria; Procter, Rob; He, Yulan;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: UKRI | Learning from COVID-19: A... (EP/V048597/1)

    The peer-reviewed publication for this dataset has been presented in the 2022 Annual Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics (NAACL), and can be accessed here: https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.02596. Please cite this when using the dataset. This dataset contains a heterogeneous set of True and False COVID claims and online sources of information for each claim. The claims have been obtained from online fact-checking sources, existing datasets and research challenges. It combines different data sources with different foci, thus enabling a comprehensive approach that combines different media (Twitter, Facebook, general websites, academia), information domains (health, scholar, media), information types (news, claims) and applications (information retrieval, veracity evaluation). The processing of the claims included an extensive de-duplication process eliminating repeated or very similar claims. The dataset is presented in a LARGE and a SMALL version, accounting for different degrees of similarity between the remaining claims (excluding respectively claims with a 90% and 99% probability of being similar, as obtained through the MonoT5 model). The similarity of claims was analysed using BM25 (Robertson et al., 1995; Crestani et al., 1998; Robertson and Zaragoza, 2009) with MonoT5 re-ranking (Nogueira et al., 2020), and BERTScore (Zhang et al., 2019). The processing of the content also involved removing claims making only a direct reference to existing content in other media (audio, video, photos); automatically obtained content not representing claims; and entries with claims or fact-checking sources in languages other than English. The claims were analysed to identify types of claims that may be of particular interest, either for inclusion or exclusion depending on the type of analysis. The following types were identified: (1) Multimodal; (2) Social media references; (3) Claims including questions; (4) Claims including numerical content; (5) Named entities, including: PERSON − People, including fictional; ORGANIZATION − Companies, agencies, institutions, etc.; GPE − Countries, cities, states; FACILITY − Buildings, highways, etc. These entities have been detected using a RoBERTa base English model (Liu et al., 2019) trained on the OntoNotes Release 5.0 dataset (Weischedel et al., 2013) using Spacy. The original labels for the claims have been reviewed and homogenised from the different criteria used by each original fact-checker into the final True and False labels. The data sources used are: - The CoronaVirusFacts/DatosCoronaVirus Alliance Database. https://www.poynter.org/ifcn-covid-19-misinformation/ - CoAID dataset (Cui and Lee, 2020) https://github.com/cuilimeng/CoAID - MM-COVID (Li et al., 2020) https://github.com/bigheiniu/MM-COVID - CovidLies (Hossain et al., 2020) https://github.com/ucinlp/covid19-data - TREC Health Misinformation track https://trec-health-misinfo.github.io/ - TREC COVID challenge (Voorhees et al., 2021; Roberts et al., 2020) https://ir.nist.gov/covidSubmit/data.html The LARGE dataset contains 5,143 claims (1,810 False and 3,333 True), and the SMALL version 1,709 claims (477 False and 1,232 True). The entries in the dataset contain the following information: - Claim. Text of the claim. - Claim label. The labels are: False, and True. - Claim source. The sources include mostly fact-checking websites, health information websites, health clinics, public institutions sites, and peer-reviewed scientific journals. - Original information source. Information about which general information source was used to obtain the claim. - Claim type. The different types, previously explained, are: Multimodal, Social Media, Questions, Numerical, and Named Entities. Funding. This work was supported by the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (grant no. EP/V048597/1, EP/T017112/1). ML and YH are supported by Turing AI Fellowships funded by the UK Research and Innovation (grant no. EP/V030302/1, EP/V020579/1). References - Arana-Catania M., Kochkina E., Zubiaga A., Liakata M., Procter R., He Y.. Natural Language Inference with Self-Attention for Veracity Assessment of Pandemic Claims. NAACL 2022 https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.02596 - Stephen E Robertson, Steve Walker, Susan Jones, Micheline M Hancock-Beaulieu, Mike Gatford, et al. 1995. Okapi at trec-3. Nist Special Publication Sp,109:109. - Fabio Crestani, Mounia Lalmas, Cornelis J Van Rijsbergen, and Iain Campbell. 1998. “is this document relevant?. . . probably” a survey of probabilistic models in information retrieval. ACM Computing Surveys (CSUR), 30(4):528–552. - Stephen Robertson and Hugo Zaragoza. 2009. The probabilistic relevance framework: BM25 and beyond. Now Publishers Inc. - Rodrigo Nogueira, Zhiying Jiang, Ronak Pradeep, and Jimmy Lin. 2020. Document ranking with a pre-trained sequence-to-sequence model. In Proceedings of the 2020 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing: Findings, pages 708–718. - Tianyi Zhang, Varsha Kishore, Felix Wu, Kilian Q Weinberger, and Yoav Artzi. 2019. Bertscore: Evaluating text generation with bert. In International Conference on Learning Representations. - Yinhan Liu, Myle Ott, Naman Goyal, Jingfei Du, Mandar Joshi, Danqi Chen, Omer Levy, Mike Lewis, Luke Zettlemoyer, and Veselin Stoyanov. 2019. Roberta: A robustly optimized bert pretraining approach. arXiv preprint arXiv:1907.11692. - Ralph Weischedel, Martha Palmer, Mitchell Marcus, Eduard Hovy, Sameer Pradhan, Lance Ramshaw, Nianwen Xue, Ann Taylor, Jeff Kaufman, Michelle Franchini, et al. 2013. Ontonotes release 5.0 ldc2013t19. Linguistic Data Consortium, Philadelphia, PA, 23. - Limeng Cui and Dongwon Lee. 2020. Coaid: Covid-19 healthcare misinformation dataset. arXiv preprint arXiv:2006.00885. - Yichuan Li, Bohan Jiang, Kai Shu, and Huan Liu. 2020. Mm-covid: A multilingual and multimodal data repository for combating covid-19 disinformation. - Tamanna Hossain, Robert L. Logan IV, Arjuna Ugarte, Yoshitomo Matsubara, Sean Young, and Sameer Singh. 2020. COVIDLies: Detecting COVID-19 misinformation on social media. In Proceedings of the 1st Workshop on NLP for COVID-19 (Part 2) at EMNLP 2020, Online. Association for Computational Linguistics. - Ellen Voorhees, Tasmeer Alam, Steven Bedrick, Dina Demner-Fushman, William R Hersh, Kyle Lo, Kirk Roberts, Ian Soboroff, and Lucy Lu Wang. 2021. Trec-covid: constructing a pandemic information retrieval test collection. In ACM SIGIR Forum, volume 54, pages 1–12. ACM New York, NY, USA.

  • Research data . 2022
    Open Access Divehi
    Authors: 
    Feener, R M; Daly, P; Ishikawa, N;
    Publisher: University of Oxford
    Country: United Kingdom

    The Maritime Asia Heritage Survey works to systematically inventory and document endangered tangible cultural heritage in the Maldives and Indonesia – including historical structures, archaeological sites, manuscripts and physical objects. The documentation produced in the course of our work includes site, feature, and object records with geospatial data, digital photography, LiDAR point clouds, orthophotomaps, 3D models, CAD site plans and architectural elevations, IIIF digitized manuscripts, and oral history video interviews The materials documented through this work are critically endangered, facing both natural and human threats. Our work thus creates a digital archive of multimedia source material for the history of the Indian Ocean world. All data is also made open-access available on our project website: https://maritimeasiaheritage.cseas.kyoto-u.ac.jp The Maritime Asia Heritage Survey is based at Kyoto University’s Center for Southeast Asian Studies. It is led by Prof. R. Michael Feener (PI and Director), together with Dr Patrick Daly (Co-PI) and Prof. Noboru Ishikawa (Co-PI). The project is financially supported by the Arcadia Fund, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin (project number 4309). The MAHS Digital Heritage Documentation Lab is hosted by the Kyoto University Center for Southeast Asian Studies. Work in the Maldives is done in partnership with the Maldives National Center for Cultural Heritage, Ministry of Arts, Culture and Heritage, and in Indonesia with the Directorate General of Culture, Ministry of Education, Culture, Research and Technology.

  • Research data . 2022
    Open Access Divehi
    Authors: 
    Feener, R M;
    Publisher: University of Oxford
    Country: United Kingdom

    The Maldives Heritage Survey aims to systematically inventory and document endangered tangible cultural heritage in the Maldives – including mosques, cemeteries, Buddhist temple ruins, and other historical structures and physical objects – through digital photography, laser scanning, 3D modelling, and GIS to create an open-access resource website and heritage database. The materials documented through this work are critically endangered, facing both natural and human threats that jeopardize the survival and accessibility of historical information for this vital node in pre-modern global economic and religious networks at the cross-roads of an interconnected Indian Ocean world. The project was led by Dr R. Michael Feener (Faculty of History / Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies) The Maldives Heritage Survey aims to systematically inventory and document endangered tangible cultural heritage in the Maldives – including mosques, cemeteries, Buddhist temple ruins, and other historical structures and physical objects – through digital photography, laser scanning, 3D modelling, and GIS to create an open-access resource website and heritage database. The materials documented through this work are critically endangered, facing both natural and human threats that jeopardize the survival and accessibility of historical information for this vital node in pre-modern global economic and religious networks at the cross-roads of an interconnected Indian Ocean world.

  • Authors: 
    Coulter, Matthew;
    Country: United Kingdom

    This dataset contains files supporting the figures published in the article 'Patterns of Communication during the 1241 Mongol Invasion of Europe: Insights from the Ottobeuren Collection'. The purpose of these figures is to provide network visualizations of the connections found in 1) the Ottobeuren letter collection (Innsbruck, Universitäts- und Landesbibliothek Tirol, Cod. 187, ff. 1v–8v), and 2) communication between actors involved in planning the defence of the Holy Roman Empire against the Mongols between approximately March and July 1241. The fileset includes the Gephi master file used to create the figures, CSV files containing raw data, and a README file. The data supporting these figures was compiled by the author first between September and November 2019, and then between March and November 2020, concurrently with the production of the article draft. It was revised in March 2021. This research was supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council under grant number 2280801, and by Masters funding from the Isaac Newton Trust and St John’s College, University of Cambridge.

  • Authors: 
    Ferraby, Rose; Millett, Martin; Dunbar, E; Evans, Jerry; Giorgi, John; Lucas, Jason; Mills, Phillip; Monteil, Gwladys; Powlesland, Dominic; Rackham, James; +3 more
    Publisher: Faculty of Classics
    Country: United Kingdom

    This record primarily consists of a spreadsheet with links to the files that constitute the data and other supporting information that detail the excavations in 2017. The main record for the Aldborough project is here: https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/275723 The collection relating to this particular dataset may be found at this URL: https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/335104; in addition, permanent links (DOIs) to the individual records (context sheets, find listings etc) are available in the attached spreadsheet. The Aldborough Roman Town Project was set up in 2009 by Dr Rose Ferraby and Prof. Martin Millett, Faculty of Classics, University of Cambridge. The project was designed to carry out archaeological research on the town of Isurium Brigantum, now the village of Aldborough in North Yorkshire, with an aim to better understanding its origins, development and its role in the social, political and economic scene of Roman Britain. This built upon a huge body of work already carried out by Colin Dobinson and volunteers from the Yorkshire Archaeological Society. Fieldwalking took place over large areas in and around the Roman town, as well as some small areas of geophysical survey. This data is all being brought together as part of the project. To begin with, the project will use geophysical survey to establish a landscape scale view of the sub-surface archaeological remains of the town, its defenses, road system and extra-mural areas. Already after only 3 years, this has revealed that Isurium Brigantium is far less straight forward than has previously presumed; rather the evidence collected so far suggests a much more complex picture of development, use and evolution into the Anglo-Saxon period. Once the survey is complete, excavation may take place to start to investigate some of the more complex areas of the town. A number of different geophysical techniques are being employed at the site, in order to better understand the various aspects of the archaeological record. Magnetometer and topographic surveys have been used across large areas of the town, whereas Ground Penetrating Radar has been used in limited areas with more complicated stratigraphy.

  • Authors: 
    Recchia, Gabriel; Jones, Ewan; Nulty, Paul; de Bolla, Peter; Regan, John;
    Publisher: Apollo - University of Cambridge Repository
    Country: United Kingdom

    This dataset consists of: $$ \ $$ I. Source code and documentation for the "Shared Lexis Tool", a Windows desktop application that provides a means of exploring all of the words that are statistically associated with a word provided by the user, in a given corpus of text (for certain predefined corpora), over a given date range. $$ \ $$ II. Source code and documentation for the "Coassociation Grapher", a Windows desktop application. Given a particular word of interest (a “focal token”) in a particular corpus of text, the Coassociation Grapher allows you to view the relative probability of observing other terms (“bound tokens”) before or after the focal token. $$ \ $$ III. Numerous precomputed files that need to be hosted on a webserver in order for the Shared Lexis Tool to function properly; $$ \ $$ IV. Files that were created in the course of conducting the research described in "Tracing shifting conceptual vocabularies through time" and "The idea of liberty" (full citations in above section 'SHARING/ACCESS INFORMATION'), including "cliques" (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clique_(graph_theory)) of words that frequently appear together; $$ \ $$ V. Source code of text-processing scripts developed by the Concept Lab, primarily for the purpose of generating precomputed files described in section III, and associated data. $$ \ $$ The Shared Lexis Tool and Coassociation Grapher (and the required precomputed files) are also being hosted at https://concept-lab.lib.cam.ac.uk/ from 2018 to 2023, and therefore those who are merely interested in using the tools within this time frame will have no use for the present dataset. However, these files may be useful for individuals who wish to host the files on their own webserver, for example, in order to use the Shared Lexis tool past 2023. See README.txt for more information. Foundation for the Future, DIGITAL KNOWLEDGE, RG74515

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Zhu, Lixing; He, Yulan; Zhou, Deyu;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: UKRI | Twenty20Insight (EP/T017112/1), UKRI | Turing AI Fellowship: Eve... (EP/V020579/1)

    topical_wordvec_models You first need to create a save folder for training. Download the [saved model](https://topicvecmodels.s3.eu-west-2.amazonaws.com/save/47/model) and place it in ./save/47/ to run the trained model. To construct the training set, refer to https://github.com/somethingx02/topical_wordvec_model please. Trained [wordvecs](https://topicvecmodels.s3.eu-west-2.amazonaws.com/save/47/aggrd_all_wordrep.txt).