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5 Research products, page 1 of 1

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
  • Publications
  • Research data
  • 2018-2022
  • SEANOE
  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage

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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Mohamed, Kolliyil; Sathianandan, Thayyil; Vivekanandan, Elayaperumal; Kuriakose, Somy; Ganga, Upendra; Pillai, Lakshmi; Nair, Rekha;
    Publisher: SEANOE

    Taking advantage of published data on life-history traits and short-term information on fishery parameters from 3132 records for 644 fish stocks along the coast of India, we calculated resilience (R) and vulnerability (V). Further, we developed an Index of Resilience and Vulnerability (IRV) for 133 species of tropical finfishes, crustaceans, and molluscs. Using 7 resilience and 6 vulnerability attributes, two-dimensional scatter plots of the resilience and vulnerability scores were generated and the Euclidean distance and angle from the origin to each point were calculated to determine IRV and the effect of fishing on fish species. By ranking the species, the top 10 highly resilient, highly vulnerable, and high-risk species (low IRV) were identified. While small-sized species with fast growth rate and low trophic level were among the highly resilient species, large predatory species such as sharks and barracudas were among the highly vulnerable and high-risk species. More than 100 of the 133 species were resilient-yet-vulnerable, and most crustaceans showed high resilience. Differences in IRV scores among species within the same family were discernible, indicating the differences in the biological characteristics and response to fishing. Sensitivity analysis indicated that an abridged IRV with 6 attributes works similar to 13 attributes and can be used in data-deficient situations. Comparison of R and V of IRV with other assessments showed different results because of divergences in the objectives, number and types of attributes, and thresholds used. These assessments do not convey the same information and therefore great care must be taken for reproducing these frameworks to other fisheries. The results of IRV analysis can be useful for stock assessments and in developing effective management measures in combination with other complementary information.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Arnaubec, Aurelien; Raugel, Ewen;
    Publisher: SEANOE

    Abstract Torpedo boat wreck off-the southern French Mediterranean coast (43.124°N;6.523°E), at a water depth of ~476 m. This battle ship sank in 1903 (https://www.postenavalemilitaire.com/t11913-torpilleur-059-1881-1903) and the wreck is is ~20 m long and 3 m wide, raising ~2 m above the surrounding seafloor. This shipwreck was surveyed using the HROV Arianne in 2016, deployed from N/O L’Europe, and equipped with a vertical electronic still camera. Two datasets are provided. First, the survey imagery, that consists of 442 images (jpeg format) and an associated navigation file in dim2 format (torpdo_boat_imagery). Second, a 3D textured model of the site (obj format), together with the a kml file for georeferencing, and a geotiff orthomosaic (torpedo_boat_model). This dataset is one of several sets released with a paper by Arnaubec et al. (submitted to Computer and Geosciences) presenting the Matisse image processing software, and the 3DMetrics Visualization and analysis software (ref Github to come). Arnaubec, A., J. Escartín, J. Opderbecke, M. Matabos, N. Gracias, submitted, Underwater 3D terrain reconstruction from video or still imagery: Processing and exploitation software (MATISSE \& 3DMETRICS), Computers and Geosciences

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Michel, Loïc N.; Bell, James B.; Dubois, Stanislas F.; Le Pans, Mathilde; Lepoint, Gilles; Olu, Karine; Reid, William D. K.; Sarrazin, Jozee; Schaal, Gauthier; Hayden, Brian;
    Publisher: SEANOE
    Country: Belgium

    The use of stable isotopes as ecological tracers in deep-sea ecosystems has a long history, dating back to the late 1970’s. Stable isotopes have been instrumental to many key-findings about ecosystem functioning, particularly in chemosynthesis-based habitats (hydrothermal vents, cold seeps). However, constraining sampling logistics commonly limit the scope, extent, and therefore insights drawn from isotope-based deep-sea studies. Overall, much is left to discover about factors globally influencing food web structure in deep-sea ecosystems. In this context, deep-sea ecologists have to ensure that no sample is left unexploited, and that all generated data are easily discoverable, available and reusable. DeepIso is a collaborative effort to produce a global compilation of stable isotope ratios and elemental contents in organisms from deep-sea ecosystems. In doing so, it aims to provide the deep-sea community with an open data analysis tool that can be used in the context of future ecological research, and to help deep-sea researchers to use stable isotope markers at their full efficiency. More info about the project can be found at https://loicnmichel.com/deepiso/ As of v1 (2020/10/22), the database contains 15 distinct datasets, for a total of 18677 fully documented measurements. Archived parameters currently include δ13C (n = 4587), δ15N (n = 4388), δ34S (n = 951), %C (n = 2740), %N (n = 2741), %S (n = 752) and C/N ratio (n = 2518). Those measurements pertain to 4378 distinct samples belonging to 493 taxa, plus sediments, suspended particulate organic matter, plankton and detritus. Samples were taken between 1989 and 2018 in multiple environments (hydrothermal vents, cold seeps, cold water coral reefs, and other benthic or pelagic environments) and at depths ranging up to 5209 meters. The database consists of three files: one containing the data itself, one describing all used terms (measurements or metadata, derived from Darwin Core standards, https://dwc.tdwg.org/terms/), and a changelog detailing changes made between successive versions. DeepIso is a collaborative effort to produce a global compilation of stable isotope ratios and elemental contents in organisms from deep-sea ecosystems. In doing so, it aims to provide the deep-sea community with an open data analysis tool that can be used in the context of future ecological research, and to help deep-sea researchers to use stable isotope markers at their full efficiency. More info about the project can be found at https://loicnmichel.com/deepiso/ DeepIso - a global open database of stable isotope ratios and elemental contents for deep-sea ecosystems

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Methou, Pierre; Michel, Loic; Segonzac, Michel; Cambon Bonavita, Marie-Anne; Pradillon, Florence;
    Publisher: SEANOE

    During the 2018 BICOSE 2 cruise of RV Pourquoi Pas ? (Cambon-Bonavita 2018, https://doi.org/10.17600/18000004), alvinocaridid shrimps were sampled in two deep-sea hydrothermal vent fields: Snake Pit and TAG (Mid-Atlantic Ridge). Stable isotope ratios and elemental contents of carbon, nitrogen and sulphur of 251 samples belonging to different life stages of 4 shrimp taxa were measured. Samples were identified and frozen at -80°C on board, then brought back to the laboratory for processing. They were prepared for analysis at the LEP (Laboratoire Environnement Profond, Ifremer, Centre de Bretagne, France; https://wwz.ifremer.fr/deep_eng/). Analytical measurements were performed at University of Liège (Belgium)’s stable isotope facility (Laboratory of Oceanology, Stable Isotope in Environmental Sciences and Trophic Ecology workgroup, http://labos.ulg.ac.be/oceanologie/recherches/isotopes-stables/). Results of the analysis of the dataset for two of the shrimp species are published in: Methou, P., Michel, L., Segonzac. M., Cambon-Bonavita, M.-A., Pradillon, F. (2020). Integrative taxonomy revisits the ontogeny and trophic niches of Rimicaris vent shrimps, Royal Society Open Science. The dataset consists of two files: one containing the data itself, and one describing all used terms (measurements or metadata).

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Foveau, Aurelie; Jac, Cyrielle; Llapasset, Margaux; Guillerme, Chloé; Desroy, Nicolas; Vaz, Sandrine;
    Publisher: SEANOE

    Particularly suited to the purpose of measuring the sensitivity of benthic communities to trawling, a trawl disturbance indicator (de Juan and Demestre, 2012, de Juan et al. 2009) was proposed based on benthic species biological traits to evaluate the sensibility of mega- and epifaunal community to fishing pressure known to have a physical impact on the seafloor (such as dredging and bottom trawling). The selected biological traits were chosen as they determine vulnerability to trawling: mobility, fragility, position on substrata, average size and feeding mode that can easily be related to the fragility, recoverability and vulnerability ecological concepts. The five categories retained are functional traits that were selected based on the knowledge of the response of benthic taxa to trawling disturbance (de Juan et al., 2009). They reflect respectively the possibility to avoid direct gear impact, to benefit from trawling for feeding, to escape gear, to get caught by the net and to resist trawling/dredging action, each of these characteristics being either advantageous or sensitive to trawling. To expand this approach to that proposed by Certain et al. (2015), the protection status of certain species was also indicated. To enable quantitative analysis, a score was assigned to each category: from low sensitivity (0) to high sensitivity (3). Biological traits of species have been defined, from the BIOTIC database (MARLIN, 2014) and from information given by Garcia (2010), Le Pape et al. (2007) and Brind’Amour et al. (2009). For missing traits, additional information from literature has been considered. The protection status of each taxa was also scored: Atlantic species listed in OSPAR List of Threatened and/or Declining Species and Habitats (https://www.ospar.org/work-areas/bdc/species-habitats/list-of-threatened-declining-species-habitats) and Mediterranean species listed in Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems (FAO, 2018 and Oceana, 2017) were scored 3 and other species were scored 1. The scores of 1085 taxa commonly found in bottom trawl by-catch in the southern North Sea, English Channel and north-western Mediterranean were described.

Advanced search in Research products
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The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
5 Research products, page 1 of 1
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Mohamed, Kolliyil; Sathianandan, Thayyil; Vivekanandan, Elayaperumal; Kuriakose, Somy; Ganga, Upendra; Pillai, Lakshmi; Nair, Rekha;
    Publisher: SEANOE

    Taking advantage of published data on life-history traits and short-term information on fishery parameters from 3132 records for 644 fish stocks along the coast of India, we calculated resilience (R) and vulnerability (V). Further, we developed an Index of Resilience and Vulnerability (IRV) for 133 species of tropical finfishes, crustaceans, and molluscs. Using 7 resilience and 6 vulnerability attributes, two-dimensional scatter plots of the resilience and vulnerability scores were generated and the Euclidean distance and angle from the origin to each point were calculated to determine IRV and the effect of fishing on fish species. By ranking the species, the top 10 highly resilient, highly vulnerable, and high-risk species (low IRV) were identified. While small-sized species with fast growth rate and low trophic level were among the highly resilient species, large predatory species such as sharks and barracudas were among the highly vulnerable and high-risk species. More than 100 of the 133 species were resilient-yet-vulnerable, and most crustaceans showed high resilience. Differences in IRV scores among species within the same family were discernible, indicating the differences in the biological characteristics and response to fishing. Sensitivity analysis indicated that an abridged IRV with 6 attributes works similar to 13 attributes and can be used in data-deficient situations. Comparison of R and V of IRV with other assessments showed different results because of divergences in the objectives, number and types of attributes, and thresholds used. These assessments do not convey the same information and therefore great care must be taken for reproducing these frameworks to other fisheries. The results of IRV analysis can be useful for stock assessments and in developing effective management measures in combination with other complementary information.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Arnaubec, Aurelien; Raugel, Ewen;
    Publisher: SEANOE

    Abstract Torpedo boat wreck off-the southern French Mediterranean coast (43.124°N;6.523°E), at a water depth of ~476 m. This battle ship sank in 1903 (https://www.postenavalemilitaire.com/t11913-torpilleur-059-1881-1903) and the wreck is is ~20 m long and 3 m wide, raising ~2 m above the surrounding seafloor. This shipwreck was surveyed using the HROV Arianne in 2016, deployed from N/O L’Europe, and equipped with a vertical electronic still camera. Two datasets are provided. First, the survey imagery, that consists of 442 images (jpeg format) and an associated navigation file in dim2 format (torpdo_boat_imagery). Second, a 3D textured model of the site (obj format), together with the a kml file for georeferencing, and a geotiff orthomosaic (torpedo_boat_model). This dataset is one of several sets released with a paper by Arnaubec et al. (submitted to Computer and Geosciences) presenting the Matisse image processing software, and the 3DMetrics Visualization and analysis software (ref Github to come). Arnaubec, A., J. Escartín, J. Opderbecke, M. Matabos, N. Gracias, submitted, Underwater 3D terrain reconstruction from video or still imagery: Processing and exploitation software (MATISSE \& 3DMETRICS), Computers and Geosciences

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Michel, Loïc N.; Bell, James B.; Dubois, Stanislas F.; Le Pans, Mathilde; Lepoint, Gilles; Olu, Karine; Reid, William D. K.; Sarrazin, Jozee; Schaal, Gauthier; Hayden, Brian;
    Publisher: SEANOE
    Country: Belgium

    The use of stable isotopes as ecological tracers in deep-sea ecosystems has a long history, dating back to the late 1970’s. Stable isotopes have been instrumental to many key-findings about ecosystem functioning, particularly in chemosynthesis-based habitats (hydrothermal vents, cold seeps). However, constraining sampling logistics commonly limit the scope, extent, and therefore insights drawn from isotope-based deep-sea studies. Overall, much is left to discover about factors globally influencing food web structure in deep-sea ecosystems. In this context, deep-sea ecologists have to ensure that no sample is left unexploited, and that all generated data are easily discoverable, available and reusable. DeepIso is a collaborative effort to produce a global compilation of stable isotope ratios and elemental contents in organisms from deep-sea ecosystems. In doing so, it aims to provide the deep-sea community with an open data analysis tool that can be used in the context of future ecological research, and to help deep-sea researchers to use stable isotope markers at their full efficiency. More info about the project can be found at https://loicnmichel.com/deepiso/ As of v1 (2020/10/22), the database contains 15 distinct datasets, for a total of 18677 fully documented measurements. Archived parameters currently include δ13C (n = 4587), δ15N (n = 4388), δ34S (n = 951), %C (n = 2740), %N (n = 2741), %S (n = 752) and C/N ratio (n = 2518). Those measurements pertain to 4378 distinct samples belonging to 493 taxa, plus sediments, suspended particulate organic matter, plankton and detritus. Samples were taken between 1989 and 2018 in multiple environments (hydrothermal vents, cold seeps, cold water coral reefs, and other benthic or pelagic environments) and at depths ranging up to 5209 meters. The database consists of three files: one containing the data itself, one describing all used terms (measurements or metadata, derived from Darwin Core standards, https://dwc.tdwg.org/terms/), and a changelog detailing changes made between successive versions. DeepIso is a collaborative effort to produce a global compilation of stable isotope ratios and elemental contents in organisms from deep-sea ecosystems. In doing so, it aims to provide the deep-sea community with an open data analysis tool that can be used in the context of future ecological research, and to help deep-sea researchers to use stable isotope markers at their full efficiency. More info about the project can be found at https://loicnmichel.com/deepiso/ DeepIso - a global open database of stable isotope ratios and elemental contents for deep-sea ecosystems

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Methou, Pierre; Michel, Loic; Segonzac, Michel; Cambon Bonavita, Marie-Anne; Pradillon, Florence;
    Publisher: SEANOE

    During the 2018 BICOSE 2 cruise of RV Pourquoi Pas ? (Cambon-Bonavita 2018, https://doi.org/10.17600/18000004), alvinocaridid shrimps were sampled in two deep-sea hydrothermal vent fields: Snake Pit and TAG (Mid-Atlantic Ridge). Stable isotope ratios and elemental contents of carbon, nitrogen and sulphur of 251 samples belonging to different life stages of 4 shrimp taxa were measured. Samples were identified and frozen at -80°C on board, then brought back to the laboratory for processing. They were prepared for analysis at the LEP (Laboratoire Environnement Profond, Ifremer, Centre de Bretagne, France; https://wwz.ifremer.fr/deep_eng/). Analytical measurements were performed at University of Liège (Belgium)’s stable isotope facility (Laboratory of Oceanology, Stable Isotope in Environmental Sciences and Trophic Ecology workgroup, http://labos.ulg.ac.be/oceanologie/recherches/isotopes-stables/). Results of the analysis of the dataset for two of the shrimp species are published in: Methou, P., Michel, L., Segonzac. M., Cambon-Bonavita, M.-A., Pradillon, F. (2020). Integrative taxonomy revisits the ontogeny and trophic niches of Rimicaris vent shrimps, Royal Society Open Science. The dataset consists of two files: one containing the data itself, and one describing all used terms (measurements or metadata).

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Foveau, Aurelie; Jac, Cyrielle; Llapasset, Margaux; Guillerme, Chloé; Desroy, Nicolas; Vaz, Sandrine;
    Publisher: SEANOE

    Particularly suited to the purpose of measuring the sensitivity of benthic communities to trawling, a trawl disturbance indicator (de Juan and Demestre, 2012, de Juan et al. 2009) was proposed based on benthic species biological traits to evaluate the sensibility of mega- and epifaunal community to fishing pressure known to have a physical impact on the seafloor (such as dredging and bottom trawling). The selected biological traits were chosen as they determine vulnerability to trawling: mobility, fragility, position on substrata, average size and feeding mode that can easily be related to the fragility, recoverability and vulnerability ecological concepts. The five categories retained are functional traits that were selected based on the knowledge of the response of benthic taxa to trawling disturbance (de Juan et al., 2009). They reflect respectively the possibility to avoid direct gear impact, to benefit from trawling for feeding, to escape gear, to get caught by the net and to resist trawling/dredging action, each of these characteristics being either advantageous or sensitive to trawling. To expand this approach to that proposed by Certain et al. (2015), the protection status of certain species was also indicated. To enable quantitative analysis, a score was assigned to each category: from low sensitivity (0) to high sensitivity (3). Biological traits of species have been defined, from the BIOTIC database (MARLIN, 2014) and from information given by Garcia (2010), Le Pape et al. (2007) and Brind’Amour et al. (2009). For missing traits, additional information from literature has been considered. The protection status of each taxa was also scored: Atlantic species listed in OSPAR List of Threatened and/or Declining Species and Habitats (https://www.ospar.org/work-areas/bdc/species-habitats/list-of-threatened-declining-species-habitats) and Mediterranean species listed in Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems (FAO, 2018 and Oceana, 2017) were scored 3 and other species were scored 1. The scores of 1085 taxa commonly found in bottom trawl by-catch in the southern North Sea, English Channel and north-western Mediterranean were described.