Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
44 Research products, page 1 of 5

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
  • Publications
  • Research data
  • Research software
  • Other research products
  • 2012-2021
  • Open Access
  • Article
  • European Commission
  • OpenAIRE
  • Religions
  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage

10
arrow_drop_down
Date (most recent)
arrow_drop_down
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Nikolay Pavlov;
    Publisher: Informa UK Limited
    Project: EC | CDE4Peace (882055)
  • Publication . Article . Other literature type . Preprint . 2021 . Embargo End Date: 01 Jan 2021
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Stian Soiland-Reyes; Peter Sefton; Mercè Crosas; Leyla Jael Castro; Frederik Coppens; José M. Fernández; Daniel Garijo; Björn Grüning; Marco La Rosa; Simone Leo; +6 more
    Publisher: arXiv
    Countries: Netherlands, United Kingdom, Belgium, United Kingdom, Netherlands
    Project: EC | IBISBA 1.0 (730976), SSHRC , EC | PREP-IBISBA (871118), EC | EOSC-Life (824087), EC | RELIANCE (101017501), EC | BioExcel-2 (823830), EC | SYNTHESYS PLUS (823827), EC | IBISBA 1.0 (730976), SSHRC , EC | PREP-IBISBA (871118),...

    An increasing number of researchers support reproducibility by including pointers to and descriptions of datasets, software and methods in their publications. However, scientific articles may be ambiguous, incomplete and difficult to process by automated systems. In this paper we introduce RO-Crate, an open, community-driven, and lightweight approach to packaging research artefacts along with their metadata in a machine readable manner. RO-Crate is based on Schema$.$org annotations in JSON-LD, aiming to establish best practices to formally describe metadata in an accessible and practical way for their use in a wide variety of situations. An RO-Crate is a structured archive of all the items that contributed to a research outcome, including their identifiers, provenance, relations and annotations. As a general purpose packaging approach for data and their metadata, RO-Crate is used across multiple areas, including bioinformatics, digital humanities and regulatory sciences. By applying "just enough" Linked Data standards, RO-Crate simplifies the process of making research outputs FAIR while also enhancing research reproducibility. An RO-Crate for this article is available at https://www.researchobject.org/2021-packaging-research-artefacts-with-ro-crate/ Comment: 42 pages. Submitted to Data Science

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ahuvia Goren;
    Project: EC | JEWTACT (801861)

    In recent years, scholars have devoted a great deal of attention to the history of scholarship in general and, more specifically, to the emergence of critical historical and anthropological literature from and within ecclesiastical scholarship. However, few studies have discussed the Jewish figures who took part in this process. This paper analyzes the role played by historiographical and ethnographical writing in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Italian Jewish–Christian polemics. Tracing various Christian polemical ethnographical depictions of the Jewish rite of shaking the lulav (sacramental palm leaves used by Jews during the festival of Sukkot), it discusses the variety of ways in which Jewish scholars responded to these depictions or circumvented them. These responses reflect the Jewish scholars’ familiarity with prevailing contemporary scholarship and the key role of translation and cultural transfers in their own attempts to create parallel works. Furthermore, this paper presents new Jewish polemical manuscript material within the relevant contexts, examines Jewish attempts to compose polemical and apologetic ethnographies, and argues that Jewish engagement with critical scholarship began earlier than scholars of this period usually suggest

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Claire Zalc;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: EC | LUBARTWORLD (818843)

    AbstractDuring its first days of existence, the Vichy regime ordered a review of recent naturalizations. In accordance with a law passed on July 22, 1940, denaturalization decisions were made on a ...

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Juan José Pierella Karlusich; Juan José Pierella Karlusich; Federico Matias Ibarbalz; Federico Matias Ibarbalz; Federico Matias Ibarbalz; Chris Bowler; Chris Bowler;
    Publisher: Oxford University Press (OUP)
    Country: Argentina
    Project: EC | AtlantECO (862923)

    Marine phytoplankton are believed to account for more than 45% of photosynthetic net primary production on Earth, and hence are at the base of marine food webs and have an enormous impact on the entire Earth system. Their members are found across many of the major clades of the tree of life, including bacteria (cyanobacteria) and multiple eukaryotic lineages that acquired photosynthesis through the process of endosymbiosis. Our understanding of their distribution in marine ecosystems and their contribution to biogeochemical cycles have increased since they were first described in the 18th century. Here, we review historical milestones in marine phytoplankton research and how their roles were gradually understood, with a particular focus on insights derived from large-scale ocean exploration. We start from the first observations made by explorers and naturalists, review the initial identification of the main phytoplankton groups and the appreciation of their function in the influential Kiel and Plymouth schools that established biological oceanography, to finally outline the contribution of modern large-scale initiatives to understand this fundamental biological component of the ocean. Fil: Pierella Karlusich, Juan José. Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique. Ecole Normale Supérieure; Francia. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas; Argentina Fil: Ibarbalz, Federico Matias. Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique. Ecole Normale Supérieure; Francia. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Oficina de Coordinación Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Centro de Investigaciones del Mar y la Atmósfera. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Centro de Investigaciones del Mar y la Atmósfera; Argentina Fil: Bowler, Chris. Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique. Ecole Normale Supérieure; Francia. Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique; Francia

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kylie Thomas;
    Country: Netherlands
    Project: EC | FEM-RESIST (838864), EC | FEM-RESIST (838864)

    In his book about his Irish-South African family and his childhood under apartheid, White Boy Running, Christopher Hope writes of the ‘bitter emotion’ that infuses the politics of both Ireland and South Africa. This article considers how the histories of political struggle in both places are intertwined through readings of photographs taken in Ireland and South Africa in the 1970s and 1980s. I draw on these photographs to develop an argument about how affective archives of music, images, and poetry travel across time and space and serve as a conduit for raising awareness about injustice and for forging transnational solidarity. At the same time these photographs provoke a consideration about how Irish identification with the struggle of black South Africans is complicated by the longer history of British colonialism and racism and how solidarity requires both remembering and forgetting. This article also begins to trace the presence and work of South African activists in Ireland who campaigned against apartheid while they were in exile.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Anders Svensson; Dorthe Dahl-Jensen; Jørgen Peder Steffensen; Thomas Blunier; Sune Olander Rasmussen; Bo Møllesøe Vinther; Paul Vallelonga; Emilie Capron; Vasileios Gkinis; Eliza Cook; +16 more
    Publisher: Copernicus GmbH
    Countries: France, United Kingdom, Switzerland, France, Denmark, Switzerland, France, France, Denmark, France ...
    Project: SNSF | EURODIVERSITY 2005 FP083-... (114216), EC | THERA (820047), EC | TiPES (820970), NSF | Collaborative Research: I... (1142166), NSF | Collaborative Research: I... (0839093), SNSF | EURODIVERSITY 2005 FP083-... (114216), EC | THERA (820047), EC | TiPES (820970), NSF | Collaborative Research: I... (1142166), NSF | Collaborative Research: I... (0839093)

    The last glacial period is characterized by a number of millennial climate events that have been identified in both Greenland and Antarctic ice cores and that are abrupt in Greenland climate records. The mechanisms governing this climate variability remain a puzzle that requires a precise synchronization of ice cores from the two hemispheres to be resolved. Previously, Greenland and Antarctic ice cores have been synchronized primarily via their common records of gas concentrations or isotopes from the trapped air and via cosmogenic isotopes measured on the ice. In this work, we apply ice core volcanic proxies and annual layer counting to identify large volcanic eruptions that have left a signature in both Greenland and Antarctica. Generally, no tephra is associated with those eruptions in the ice cores, so the source of the eruptions cannot be identified. Instead, we identify and match sequences of volcanic eruptions with bipolar distribution of sulfate, i.e. unique patterns of volcanic events separated by the same number of years at the two poles. Using this approach, we pinpoint 82 large bipolar volcanic eruptions throughout the second half of the last glacial period (12–60 ka). This improved ice core synchronization is applied to determine the bipolar phasing of abrupt climate change events at decadal-scale precision. In response to Greenland abrupt climatic transitions, we find a response in the Antarctic water isotope signals (δ18O and deuterium excess) that is both more immediate and more abrupt than that found with previous gas-based interpolar synchronizations, providing additional support for our volcanic framework. On average, the Antarctic bipolar seesaw climate response lags the midpoint of Greenland abrupt δ18O transitions by 122±24 years. The time difference between Antarctic signals in deuterium excess and δ18O, which likewise informs the time needed to propagate the signal as described by the theory of the bipolar seesaw but is less sensitive to synchronization errors, suggests an Antarctic δ18O lag behind Greenland of 152±37 years. These estimates are shorter than the 200 years suggested by earlier gas-based synchronizations. As before, we find variations in the timing and duration between the response at different sites and for different events suggesting an interaction of oceanic and atmospheric teleconnection patterns as well as internal climate variability.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Yichi Zhang;
    Publisher: Informa UK Limited
    Project: EC | BROKEX (802070)

    This article examines a largely unexplored component of China’s classical garden system – the gardens of salt merchants in Tianjin during the Qing Dynasty (1636-1911). Beyond existing works, which tend to focus on imperial and scholar gardens – gardens of the ruling elites – this examination of merchant gardens contributes to garden history by revealing that merchants created gardens to improve their low social status. It further reveals shifts in the functions, architectural design and flora of the gardens which reflects both individual aesthetics and the changing fortunes of Tianjin’s salt merchants in general. Salt merchant gardens in Tianjin initially presented idyllic scenery to create literary-based, self-immersed spaces. Then beginning in the 1720s, they evolved into a showcase of rising merchant power displaying affluence, thereby enabling merchants to improve their social rank. Finally, from the 1840s, salt merchant gardens gradually became extravagant enclosures as the collapse of the established social structure unfolded.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Najafabadipour, Marjan; Zanin, Massimiliano; Rodríguez-González, Alejandro; Torrente, Maria; Nuñez García, Beatriz; Cruz Bermudez, Juan Luis; Provencio, Mariano; Menasalvas, Ernestina;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | IASIS (727658), EC | IASIS (727658)

    The automatic extraction of a patient’s natural history from Electronic Health Records (EHRs) is a critical step towards building intelligent systems that can reason about clinical variables and support decision making. Although EHRs contain a large amount of valuable information about the patient’s medical care, this information can only be fully understood when analyzed in a temporal context. Any intelligent system should then be able to extract medical concepts, date expressions, temporal relations and the temporal ordering of medical events from the free texts of EHRs; yet, this task is hard to tackle, due to the domain specific nature of EHRs, writing quality and lack of structure of these texts, and more generally the presence of redundant information. In this paper, we introduce a new Natural Language Processing (NLP) framework, capable of extracting the aforementioned elements from EHRs written in Spanish using rule-based methods. We focus on building medical timelines, which include disease diagnosis and its progression over time. By using a large dataset of EHRs comprising information about patients suffering from lung cancer, we show that our framework has an adequate level of performance by correctly building the timeline for 843 patients from a pool of 989 patients, achieving a correct result in 85% of instances.

  • Publication . Article . Preprint . Other literature type . Conference object . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . 2020 . Embargo End Date: 10 Jul 2020
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Biao Zhang; Philip Williams; Ivan Titov; Rico Sennrich;
    Publisher: Association for Computational Linguistics
    Countries: Switzerland, United Kingdom
    Project: EC | ELITR (825460), SNSF | Multi-Task Learning with ... (176727), EC | GoURMET (825299)

    Massively multilingual models for neural machine translation (NMT) are theoretically attractive, but often underperform bilingual models and deliver poor zero-shot translations. In this paper, we explore ways to improve them. We argue that multilingual NMT requires stronger modeling capacity to support language pairs with varying typological characteristics, and overcome this bottleneck via language-specific components and deepening NMT architectures. We identify the off-target translation issue (i.e. translating into a wrong target language) as the major source of the inferior zero-shot performance, and propose random online backtranslation to enforce the translation of unseen training language pairs. Experiments on OPUS-100 (a novel multilingual dataset with 100 languages) show that our approach substantially narrows the performance gap with bilingual models in both one-to-many and many-to-many settings, and improves zero-shot performance by ~10 BLEU, approaching conventional pivot-based methods. Comment: ACL2020