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The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
6,501 Research products, page 1 of 651

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  • Publication . Other literature type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Agasøster, Bodil; Arar, Karin; Gyrid Havåg Bergseth; Beuster, Benjamin; Bidargaddi, Archana; Revheim, Sigbjørn; Risnes, Ørnulf; Skjåk, Knut Kalgraff;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | SSHOC (823782), EC | SSHOC (823782)

    Milestone 34, Expose ESS’ interoperable services to external consumers, was achieved on 17 December 2021. The new system gives users access to the data catalogue of the European Social Survey (ESS) from the new data and metadata repositories via https://ess-search.nsd.no/en/all/query/.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Eduardo Andrés; Daniel González-Arribas; Manuel Soler; Maryam Kamgarpour; Manuel Sanjurjo-Rivo; Juan Simarro;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
    Project: EC | Engage (783287)
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Rose Trappes;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
    Project: EC | PHIL_OS (101001145)
  • Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Aude Bernard;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
    Project: EC | SERISS (654221), EC | SHARE-COHESION (870628), EC | SSHOC (823782), EC | SHARE-DEV3 (676536)
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Moody, Bryony; Dye, Tom; May, Keith; Buck, Caitlin;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | ARIADNEplus (823914)

    Archaeological excavations produce a wealth of data. Due to the unrepeatable nature of this fieldwork, once the site is fully excavated, digital records must be archived in a manner that best facilitates reuse. However, in our experience, despite the best efforts of digital repositories such as ADS, archiving data does not ensure reusability. In this talk, we discuss attempts to reuse data for chronological modelling. We focus on three case studies where the user wished to reuse digital chronological data and ran into problems. Following this, we will outline a prototype software we are developing for handling the relative and absolute dating evidence. This software focuses on evidence obtained during single context excavations, as carried out in many European countries such as the UK. This software uses mathematical graph theory to manage stratigraphic and chronological information during Bayesian chronology construction. We provide an overview of the process that the software follows. Following this, we will focus on managing data during this process. Such management includes: at which points in the process we save data from the software; what format should our data be in; and which data to archive. Finally, we provide recommendations specific to chronological data that seek to improve the reusability of such data for future users.

  • Publication . Other literature type . Presentation . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Machado, Diego; Botica, Natália; Fernandes, Lara; Martins, Maria Manuela; Magalhães, Fernanda; Sousa, Rui;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | ARIADNEplus (823914)

    The Archaeology Unit of the University of Minho (UAUM) has carried out systematic archaeological activities in the northern region of Portugal since 1977, which has provided a significant set of data, where we highlight the enormous collections of spoils. Since the 1990s, however, it was decided to focus on more effective instruments for the storage and management of these data, whose accumulation in physical media was unviable both because of the space it occupied and the obstacles it offered to consultation. The database has evolved over the past two decades, both in the incorporation of new modules for recording archaeological data, but also in the standardization of attributes and the vocabulary used. Currently, the 2ArchIS information system, in addition to the objective of safeguarding and internally managing the data through the various ways of visualization and obtaining quantitative and qualitative analysis of an increasingly large set of data, also aims to make its data visible and shareable by the entire community through its publication in a repository. Thus, we propose for this work to present the results of the application of FAIR principles to the registration of data and metadata of ceramic material from archaeological excavations conducted by UAUM in very diverse contexts and chronologies, a phenomenon that is at the same time challenging, due to the technological, formal and decorative variety of the materials, however, for the same reasons, enriching from the methodological point of view. We will also present some studies carried out, where the access and interoperability of data from different excavations is fundamental to enable their cross-referencing and visualization in more comprehensive studies.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    O'Toole, Karen;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | ARIADNEplus (823914)

    The FAIR Principles are the foundation of data management for present-day researchers in any discipline. However, the application of these principles is relatively new and as archaeologists we often rely on data created prior to their implementation. Reusing such data poses a number of obstacles that can be time-consuming and difficult to tackle. However, particularly in the light of the COVID-19 pandemic, the reuse of data has come to the forefront as an approach researchers can use to mitigate or substitute for data that is inaccessible either temporarily or permanently. While challenges such as the interoperability, standardisation and original purpose of such data continue to exist, the opportunities presented to us by the reuse of data are becoming increasingly clear. Using the construction of an Irish bog butter database as a case study, this presentation will explore why I chose to reuse data; the challenges associated with this; and the opportunities this has presented. It will also look at how applying modern techniques to old data can create new knowledge and revolutionise our understanding of previously poorly understood phenomena – how we can make old data new again.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Parini, Martina;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | ARIADNEplus (823914)

    This contribution presents a case study about the reuse of archaeological field survey data from my ongoing PhD research, focused on the analysis of Southern Italy’s rural landscapes during the Hellenistic and Roman periods. The primary goal of the project is to identify and explain large-scale diachronic patterns in the organisation of the countryside by comparing regional variations and similarities, based on pedestrian survey data. In this poster, I look at the characteristics and significance of low-density pottery scatters, which are classified as ‘off-site’: these surface distributions are generally interpreted as important traces of long-term agricultural practices, temporal activities, or post-depositional actions. Therefore, they can contribute to reconstructing land-use strategies and contextualising the sites. The two datasets analysed were collected between 2000 and 2014 in the Sibaritide region (northern Calabria, Italy) within the framework of different projects, one by the University of Groningen (Raganello Archaeological Project) and one by the University of Calabria (Castrovillari municipality). Each project used different methodologies, regarding for example sampling strategies and the definition of survey units. Having the possibility to access and query the primary databases of the projects, data selection and different approaches are utilised to answer the research questions. In addition, this project plans to merge the datasets by applying the mapping tools and standards developed by the Roman Hinterland Database Project, which created an integrated database for the suburbium of Rome.

  • Publication . Presentation . Other literature type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Botica, Natalia; Luís, Luís; Silva2, José;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | ARIADNEplus (823914)

    The Côa Valley, considered “the most important site with open-air Paleolithic rock art”, was inscribed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site in 1998. Although the rock art of the Côa Valley has been intensively studied in the last 23 years by the Archaeological Park of the Côa Valley (PAVC), the Iron Age is a chronological period where there is a greater deficit of study and knowledge. The work we will present was developed under the RARAA project, funded by the Fundação para a Ciência e Tecnologia (FCT) “COA / OVD / 0097 / 2019- Rock Art Open Access Repository”, aiming to study the Iron Age rock art of the Côa Valley and the accessibility of data in an open access repository, describing the methodology used and seeking to implement best practices for organization, recording, storage and sharing of data. In this presentation we will give particular emphasis to the FAIR principles adopted, seeking consensus, both in the structure and in the attributes and vocabularies used, serving not only the purpose of safeguarding the data, but also its management, study and sharing. The study and interpretation of archaeological sites and rock art depend heavily on access to existing data, namely to seek parallels and cross-reference data for more comprehensive studies. Thus, we will present the RARAA project as a case study, making available in an open-access online data repository, metadata and paradata, 3D models, photos, vector drawings and maps of Iron Age rock art in the Côa valley.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Morales, Laura; Saji, Ami; Greco, Andrea;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | SSHOC (823782)

    Contributing metadata to the Ethnic and Migrant Minorities' (EMM) Survey Registry as a professional polling/survey company A training video targeting professional polling/survey companies to entice them to document their surveys on the EMM Survey Registry Target Audience for the video: Professional polling/survey companies producing quantitative surveys on ethnic and migrant minorities’ integration and/or inclusion