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The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
18 Research products, page 1 of 2

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
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  • 0509 other social sciences
  • 050904 information & library sciences
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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Partarakis N.; Doulgeraki P.; Karuzaki E.; Adami I.; Ntoa S.; Metilli D.; Bartalesi V.; Meghini C.; Marketakis Y.; Kaplanidi D.; +2 more
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | Mingei (822336), EC | Mingei (822336)

    In this article, the Mingei Online Platform is presented as an authoring platform for the representation of social and historic context encompassing a focal topic of interest. The proposed representation is employed in the contextualised presentation of a given topic, through documented narratives that support its presentation to diverse audiences. Using the obtained representation, the documentation and digital preservation of social and historical dimensions of Cultural Heritage are demonstrated. The implementation follows the Human-Centred Design approach and has been conducted under an iterative design and evaluation approach involving both usability and domain experts.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Carlo Meghini; Valentina Bartalesi; Daniele Metilli;
    Publisher: IOS Press
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | Mingei (822336), EC | Mingei (822336)

    Digital Libraries (DLs), especially in the Cultural Heritage domain, are rich in narratives. Every digital object in a DL tells some kind of story, regardless of the medium, the genre, or the type of the object. However, DLs do not offer services about narratives, for example it is not possible to discover a narrative, to create one, or to compare two narratives. Certainly, DLs offer discovery functionalities over their contents, but these services merely address the objects that carry the narratives (e.g. books, images, audiovisual objects), without regard for the narratives themselves. The present work aims at introducing narratives as first-class citizens in DLs, by providing a formal expression of what a narrative is. In particular, this paper presents a conceptualisation of the domain of narratives, and its specification through the Narrative Ontology (NOnt for short), expressed in first-order logic. NOnt has been implemented as an extension of three standard vocabularies, i.e. the CIDOC CRM, FRBRoo, and OWL Time, and using the SWRL rule language to express the axioms. On the basis of NOnt, we have developed the Narrative Building and Visualising (NBVT) tool, and applied it in four case studies to validate the ontology. NOnt is also being validated in the context of the Mingei European project, in which it is applied to the representation of knowledge about Craft Heritage. Preprint

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Arianna Gatta; Francesco Mattioli; Letizia Mencarini; Daniele Vignoli;
    Publisher: Informa UK Limited
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | EU-FER (725961)

    The role of employment uncertainty as a fertility driver has previously been studied with a limited set of constructs, leading to inconclusive results. We address this oversight by considering perceived stability of employment and perceived resilience to potential job loss as two key dimensions of employment uncertainty in relation to fertility decision-making. The present study relies on the 2017 Italian Trustlab survey and its employment uncertainty module. We find that perception of resilience to job loss is a powerful predictor of fertility intentions, whereas perception of employment stability has only a limited impact. The observed relationship between resilience and fertility intentions is robust to the inclusion of person-specific risk attitude and does not depend on the unemployment rate or the share of fixed-term contracts in the area of residence. We conclude that the notion of employment uncertainty includes distinct expectations towards the future, which should be considered separately to understand fertility decision-making.Supplementary material for this article is available at: https://doi.org/10.1080/00324728.2021.1939406.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Annalisa Pelizza;
    Publisher: SAGE Publications
    Countries: Italy, Netherlands
    Project: EC | ProcessCitizenship (714463)

    This article pursues a translational approach to the securitization of migration. It argues that sociotechnical processes of identification at the border can be conceived of as translations into legible identities of individuals who are unknown to authorities. The article contributes to the materiality debate on securitization across Critical Security Studies (CSS) and Science and Technology Studies (STS) by answering the call to conduct empirical explorations of security, and by revisiting the potential of the early sociology of translation (i.e. actor-network theory) to account for the identification of border crossers. Data collection was conducted at four identification facilities in the Hellenic Republic. Three sets of implications for the CSS-STS debate on the materiality of securitization are discussed. First, a translational approach can replace a representational understanding of identity with a performative apprehension of identification. Second, adopting a translational approach leads to acknowledge that the identification encounter is mediated by multiple, heterogeneous actors. It thus helps to open technological black boxes and reveal the key role of material qualities, affordances and limitations of artefacts. Third, a translational approach to the securitization of migration can help advance the field of ‘alterity processing’ by appreciating the de facto re-arrangements of institutional orders elicited by techno-political alignments with global security regimes.

  • Publication . Preprint . Other literature type . Article . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rebora, Simone; Boot, Peter; Pianzola, Federico; Gasser, Brigitte; Herrmann, J Berenike; Kraxenberger, Maria; Kuijpers, Moniek M; Lauer, Gerhard; Lendvai, Piroska; Messerli, Thomas C; +1 more
    Countries: Netherlands, Italy, Germany
    Project: SNSF | Forschungslogiken in den ... (183221), SNSF | Mining Goodreads: a text ... (183194), EC | READIT (792849), SNSF | Geteiltes Lesen. Literatu... (183012)

    Abstract Prominent among the social developments that the web 2.0 has facilitated is digital social reading (DSR): on many platforms there are functionalities for creating book reviews, ‘inline’ commenting on book texts, online story writing (often in the form of fanfiction), informal book discussions, book vlogs, and more. In this article, we argue that DSR offers unique possibilities for research into literature, reading, the impact of reading and literary communication. We also claim that in this context computational tools are especially relevant, making DSR a field particularly suitable for the application of Digital Humanities methods. We draw up an initial categorization of research aspects of DSR and briefly examine literature for each category. We distinguish between studies on DSR that use it as a lens to study wider processes of literary exchange as opposed to studies for which the DSR culture is a phenomenon interesting in its own right. Via seven examples of DSR research, we discuss the chosen approaches and their connection to research questions in literary studies.

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Chiara Eva Catalano; Valentina Vassallo; Sorin Hermon; Michela Spagnuolo;
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | GRAVITATE (665155)

    In this paper, we will explore the theme of the documentation of 3D cultural heritage assets, not only as entire artefacts but also including the interesting features of the object from an archaeological perspective. Indeed, the goal is supporting archaeological research and curation, providing a different approach to enrich the documentation of digital resources and their components with corresponding measurements, combining semantic and geometric techniques. A documentation scheme based on CIDOC, where measurements on digital data have been included extending CIDOC CRMdig, is discussed. To annotate accurately the components and features of the artefacts, a controlled vocabulary named Cultural Heritage Artefact Partonomy (CHAP) has been defined and integrated into the scheme as a SKOS taxonomy to showcase the proposed methodology. CHAP concerns Coroplastic, which is the study of ancient terracotta figurines and in particular the Cypriot production. Two case studies have been considered: the terracotta statues from the port of Salamis and the small clay statuettes from the Ayia Irini sanctuary. Focussing both on the artefacts and their digital counterparts, the proposed methodology supports effectively typical operations within digital libraries and repositories (e.g. search, part-based annotation), and more specific objectives such as the archaeological interpretation and digitally assisted classification, as proved in a real archaeological scenario. The proposed approach is general and applies to different contexts, since it is able to support any archaeological research where the goal is an extensive digital documentation of tangible findings including quantitative attributes.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Annalisa Pelizza;
    Publisher: SAGE Publications
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | ProcessCitizenship (714463)

    The COVID-19 pandemic invites a question about how long-standing narratives of alterity and current narratives of disease are entwined and re-enacted in the diagnosis of COVID-19. In this commentary, we discuss two related phenomena that, we argue, should be taken into account in answering this question. First, we address the diffusion of pseudoscientific accounts of minorities’ immunity to COVID-19. While apparently praising minorities’ biological resistance, such accounts rhetorically introduce a distinction between “Us” and “Them,” and in so doing produce new and re-enact old narratives of alterity. Second, these unsubstantiated narratives thrive on fake news and scarcity of data. The second part of this commentary thus surveys the methods through which the COVID-19 test is administered in various countries. We argue that techniques used for data collection have a major role in producing COVID-19 data that render contagion rates among migrants and other minorities invisible. In the conclusion, we provide two recommendations about how COVID-19 data can instead potentially work towards inclusion.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jan Sprenger;
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | Objectivity (640638)

    Why are conditional degrees of belief in an observation E, given a statistical hypothesis H, aligned with the objective probabilities expressed by H? After showing that standard replies (ratio analysis of conditional probability, chance-credence coordination) are not satisfactory, I develop a suppositional analysis of conditional degree of belief, transferring Ramsey’s classical proposal to statistical inference. The analysis saves the alignment, explains the role of chance-credence coordination, and rebuts the charge of arbitrary assessment of evidence in Bayesian inference. Finally, I explore the implications of this analysis for Bayesian reasoning with idealized models in science.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Matteo Martelli;
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | AlchemEast (724914)

    AbstractA fluid terminology was used in antiquity to refer to scientific or philosophical writings that, in some respects, may be equated with what one would call today a handbook or manual. In particular, this paper will explore a group of treatises that may be counted as examples of ancientencheiridia, a Greek term that could mean ‘hand-knife’, ‘handbook’ and even ‘napkin, towel’. All these meanings have something to tell us about the nature and the history of ancientencheiridia, some of which can be identified with well-known pieces of Graeco-Roman literature. However, the spectrum of ancientencheiridiacan be further enlarged by exploring sources that are often neglected. After giving an up-to-date overview of ancient ‘handbooks’, the article will discuss the termencheiridionin Graeco-Egyptian alchemical literature. In fact, fresh textual investigations of the Syriac tradition of Zosimus of Panopolis point to the circulation of ancient recipe books that bore this title. On the one hand, this investigation will shed new light on the tradition of other important collections of alchemical recipes, such as the medievalMappae clavicula. On the other, it will highlight some strategies that ancient alchemical authors developed in selecting, reorganizing and legitimizing earlier alchemical recipes.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Camil Demetrescu; Andrea Ribichini; Marco Schaerf;
    Publisher: Springer Verlag
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | SecondHands (643950)

    We investigate the accuracy of how author names are reported in bibliographic records excerpted from four prominent sources: WoS, Scopus, PubMed, and CrossRef. We take as a case study 44,549 publications stored in the internal database of Sapienza University of Rome, one of the largest universities in Europe. While our results indicate generally good accuracy for all bibliographic data sources considered, we highlight a number of issues that undermine the accuracy for certain classes of author names, including compound names and names with diacritics, which are common features to Italian and other Western languages.