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98 Research products, page 1 of 10

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
  • Publications
  • Research data
  • Research software
  • Other research products
  • 2017-2021
  • 05 social sciences
  • 0501 psychology and cognitive sciences
  • 050105 experimental psychology
  • European Commission
  • EU
  • DE
  • IT
  • ZENODO
  • Scientometrics
  • Social Science and Humanities

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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Rami Santeri Koskinen;
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press (CUP)
    Project: EC | LIFEMODE (818772)

    Critics of multiple realizability have recently argued that we should concentrate solely on actual here-and-now realizations that are found in nature. The possibility of alternative, but unactualized, realizations is regarded as uninteresting because it is taken to be a question of pure logic or an unverifiable scenario of science fiction. However, in the biological context only a contingent set of realizations is actualized. Drawing on recent work on the theory of neutral biological spaces, the article shows that we can have ways of assessing the modal dimension of multiple realizability that do not have to rely on mere conceivability.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Estefanía López Salas;
    Publisher: F1000 Research Limited
    Project: EC | rurALLURE (101004887)

    The H2020 project rurAllure, “Promotion of rural museums and heritage sites in the vicinity of European pilgrimage routes” (2021-2023) aims to enrich pilgrims’ experiences with the creation of meaningful cultural products focused on the lesser-known heritage sites of rural areas that are not found on pilgrimage routes, but in their surroundings. One of the project goals is to create contents and narratives to be offered to pilgrims over successive days with the integration of state-of-the-art technology. This way, hidden rural heritage will be discoverable and pilgrims will have the opportunity to actively engage with rural places nearby, their local communities, identity, and culture. The latter will no longer be passive witnesses, but active participants in transnational networks of shared history and living heritage. The rurAllure project aims to develop a new concept of mobile guide for pilgrims that will present rural heritage sites and activities of interest along with information of transportation and accommodation to help movement from and back to pilgrimage routes, as well as cohesive narratives to be consumed along the way, focused on four pilots: literary heritage on the ways to Santiago de Compostela, thermal heritage and others on the ways to Rome, ethnographic heritage on the ways to Trondheim, and natural heritage on the ways to Csíksomlyó. To facilitate the pilots’ brainstorming in the creation of multimedia contents, we developed a review of narrative models on cultural heritage storytelling. In this paper, we present the results, a collection of 22 case studies we analyzed with a common structure, from which six distinctive groups of narrative practices emerge: sound-walks, wearable guides, context-aware games, simulations, digital exhibitions, and cultural wayfinding. All cases studies disrupt traditional notions of storytelling consumption and foster new relationships between people and places of interest that may lead to advancements in the pilgrimage context.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Sánchez, Antonio;
    Publisher: Editorial CSIC
    Country: Spain
    Project: EC | RUTTER (833438)

    The voyages of exploration and discovery during the period of European maritime expansion and the immense amount of information and artefacts they produced about our knowledge of the world have maintained a difficult, if not non-existent, relationship with the main historiographical lines of the history of early modern science. This article attempts to problematize this relationship based on a historical account that seeks to highlight the scientific and institutional mechanisms that made the Magellan-Elcano voyage, the first modern voyage, possible. The text argues that this voyage was the first modern voyage because it allowed the construction of a new scientific and cartographic image of the globe and contributed to our understanding of the world as a global world, altering the foundations on which modern European economic and geographic thought was based. In that sense, the voyage was something extraordinary, but not completely unexpected. It responded to a complex process of expansionary policy and technical development that dated back to the 15th century, which in 1519 was sufficiently articulated to carry out a great feat Construyendo una imagen global del mundo: ciencia, cosmografía y navegación en tiempos de la primera circunnavegación, 1492-1522.— Los viajes de exploración y de descubrimiento de la época de la expansión marítima europea y la enorme cantidad de información y artefactos que produjeron sobre nuestro conocimiento del mundo han mantenido una difícil relación, por no decir inexistente, con las principales líneas historiográficas de la historia de la ciencia moderna. Este artículo intenta problematizar dicha relación a partir de un relato histórico que pretende destacar los mecanismos científicos e institucionales que hicieron posible el viaje de Magallanes-Elcano, el primer viaje moderno. El texto sostiene que este viaje fue el primer viaje moderno no solo porque permitió la construcción de un mapa global del mundo, de una nueva imagen científica y cartográfica del globo, sino porque además contribuyó a nuestra comprensión del mundo como un mundo global, alterando los cimientos sobre los que se sustentaba el pensamiento económico y geográfico de la Europa moderna. En ese sentido, el viaje fue algo extraordinario, pero no completamente inesperado. Respondía a un complejo proceso de política expansionista y desarrollo técnico que se remontaba al siglo XV y que en 1519 estaba lo suficientemente articulado como para llevar a cabo una gran gesta

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Tommaso Trillo; Limor Shifman;
    Publisher: University of Illinois Libraries
    Project: EC | DigitalValues (819004)

    Memes are efficient tools for far-right activism. They also offer a window into the reactionary values expressed by far-right constituents in digital spheres. In this paper, we conceptualize memes as a meeting place between the values of the far-right and the values characterizing memetic communication on social media. We examined this process through the lens of Schwartz’s theory of basic human values and a case study from Italy. Specifically, we focus on a photo-based meme genre that we named “alternative calendar commemorations.” These memes memorialize events or figures that are key to the imaginary of the far-right. As expected, we found strong appeals to collectivistic values such as patriotism and tradition. However, we also found a partial re-negotiation of the collectivistic values of the far-right through some of the individualistic values intrinsic to memes. In conclusion, we discuss the implications of this new amalgamation between context-specific far-right values and those embedded in the globalizing format of digital memes.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Christian Ost; Ruba Saleh;
    Publisher: SpringerOpen
    Project: EC | CLIC (776758)

    AbstractThe COVID-19 pandemic has led to a current global health crisis with dreadful repercussions all over the world. A global economic recession is anticipated, with strong impacts in all economic and social sectors, including the cultural sector. Although all sub sectors will be impacted (heritage sites, theatres, museums, operas, art galleries), the cultural built heritage is particularly at stake, as it relies on multiple stakeholders through a wide range of heritage-related activities (tourism, recreation, housing, real estate, construction, craftsmanship, etc.). Sites management and heritage conservation have not only been vulnerable to strong economic and social disruptions, like most of other cultural fields, but have been greatly challenged because heritage values and the paradigm of conservation (50 years after adoption of the UNESCO convention) are being themselves revisited in the perspective of the Sustainable Development Goals. The paper aims also to consider cultural heritage as part of the Cultural and Creative Sectors (CCS) and how creativity and innovation contribute to post-COVID recoveries through Schumpeter-related creative destruction process. The current crisis might be perceived in a perspective of long wave theory of innovations and economic growth. The economic history is filled with many examples of such transition period when inventions, innovations, and growth reactivate the economic development in an upward long-term trend. In such framework, crisis can trigger innovation and creativity and can be understood as opportunity to increase the CCS resilience and sustainability, as well as harness the universality and the power of creativity. Finally, the paper aims to describe implications of such situation by providing to the CCS ways to learn and experience cultural entrepreneurship, resilient strategies, new sustainable and circular business models applied to the cultural heritage sector and its conservation.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Maximilian Haas; Laëtitia Mongeard; L. Ulrici; Laetitia D'Aloïa; Agnès Cherrey; Robert Galler; Michael Benedikt;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: France
    Project: EC | FCCIS (951754)

    The European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) is a world-wide leading organisation in the field of particle physics and operation of high-class particle accelerators. Since 2013, CERN has undertaken feasibility investigations for a particle accelerator, named Future Circular Collider (FCC) to be installed within a 90–100 km subsurface infrastructure likely to enter construction phase after 2030. An important aspect of its construction and environmental impact assessment is the management of approximately 9.1 million m3 of excavated rock and soil. The aim of this paper is to thoroughly review the applications of excavated material across European subsurface construction projects from a technical point of view and set them into context with studies currently ongoing for FCC. We propose a conceptual flow model for rock characterisation with respect to both applicability of excavated material and tunnelling excavation techniques for future international subsurface construction projects. The review has revealed a vast and encouraging potential across different European construction sites efficiently using excavated rock and soil over the past decade ranging from concrete production, geopolymer production, embankment and landfilling. Examples of reviewed subsurface tunnelling projects are likely to be applied for FCC including concrete production, clay-sealing for embankments, geopolymer face stabilization, recultivation or agricultural usage as mixed soil material or sustainable waste disposal.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Evola Gianpiero; Margani Giuseppe; Costanzo Vincenzo; Tardo Carola; Marino Edoardo Michele; Semprini Giovanni; Tomasi Roberto; Halmdienst Christian; Voortman Bart;
    Publisher: IOP Publishing
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | e-SAFE (893135)

    In the framework of the ongoing four-year EU-funded innovation project called e-SAFE (“Energy and seismic affordable renovation solutions”), several solutions for the energy and seismic deep renovation of reinforced concrete (RC) framed buildings in the European countries are going to be developed and demonstrated. These solutions address both the energy performance of the building envelope and the heating and cooling of the indoor spaces, and aim to be prefabricated, customizable, low-disruptive and sustainable in order to boost the decarbonisation of the largely inefficient European building stock. This paper presents the main features of the e-SAFE solutions and the results of a preliminary analysis to verify their effectiveness and compliance with European legislation and standards. The outcomes will be useful for the design and demonstration stage, by identifying issues that need to be tackled. This file corresponds to the pre-prints of the paper presented to the Conference

  • Open Access English

    Although lexical borrowing is an important aspect of language evolution, there have been few attempts to automate the identification of borrowings in lexical datasets. Moreover, none of the solutions which have been proposed so far identify borrowings across multiple languages. This study proposes a new method for the task and tests it on a newly compiled large comparative dataset of 48 South-East Asian languages from Southern China. The method yields very promising results, while it is conceptually straightforward and easy to apply. This makes the approach a perfect candidate for computer-assisted exploratory studies on lexical borrowing in contact areas.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ahmed Hamdi; Elvys Linhares Pontes; Emanuela Boros; Thi Tuyet Hai Nguyen; Günter Hackl; Jose G. Moreno; Antoine Doucet;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: EC | NewsEye (770299)

    International audience; Named entity processing over historical texts is more and more being used due to the massive documents and archives being stored in digital libraries. However, due to the poor annotated resources of historical nature, information extraction performances fall behind those on contemporary texts. In this paper, we introduce the development of the NewsEye resource, a multilingual dataset for named entity recognition and linking enriched with stances towards named entities. The dataset is comprised of diachronic historical newspaper material published between 1850 and 1950 in French, German, Finnish, and Swedish. Such historical resource is essential in the context of developing and evaluating named entity processing systems. It evenly allows enhancing the performances of existing approaches on historical documents which enables adequate and efficient semantic indexing of historical documents on digital cultural heritage collections.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Stéphanie Bertrand; Stéphanie Bertrand; Martha Vassiliadi; Paul Zikas; Efstratios Geronikolakis; George Papagiannakis; George Papagiannakis;
    Project: EC | UViMCA (893454)

    The primary mission of cultural institutions, including heritage sites and museums, is to perform and perpetuate Cultural Heritage (CH) by ideally transforming audiences into stewards of that heritage. In recent years, these institutions have increasingly turned to Mixed Reality (MR) technologies to expand and democratize public access to Cultural Heritage - a trend that is called upon to accelerate with COVID-19 - because these technologies provide opportunities for more remote outreach, and moreover, can make partial remains or ruins more relatable to the public. But as emerging evaluations indicate, existing MR intangible and tangible Digital Cultural Heritage (DCH) applications are largely proving inadequate to engaging audiences beyond an initial fascination with the immersive 3D visualization of heritage sites and artefacts owing in part to misguided storytelling or non-compelling narratives. They fail to effectively communicate the significance of Cultural Heritage to audiences and impress upon them its value in a lasting way due to their overreliance on an education-entertainment-touristic consumption paradigm. Building on the recent case made for Literature-based MR Presence, this article examines how the literary tradition of travel narratives can be recruited to enhance presence and embodiment, and further elicit aesthetic experiences in Digital Cultural Heritage applications by drawing on recent findings from the fields of Extended Reality (XR), cognitive literary science and new museology. The projected effects of this innovative approach are not limited to an increase in audience engagement on account of a greater sense of presence and embodiment. This approach is also expected to prompt a different kind of public involvement characterized by a personal valuation of the heritage owing to aesthetic experience. As the paper ultimately discusses, this response is more compatible both with MR applications' default mode of usership, and with newly emerging conceptions of a user-centered museum (e.g., the Museum 3.0), thereby providing a narrative roadmap for future Virtual Museum (VM) applications better suited to the primary mission of transmitting and perpetuating Cultural Heritage. © Bertrand, Vassiliadi, Zikas, Geronikolakis and Papagiannakis.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
98 Research products, page 1 of 10
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Rami Santeri Koskinen;
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press (CUP)
    Project: EC | LIFEMODE (818772)

    Critics of multiple realizability have recently argued that we should concentrate solely on actual here-and-now realizations that are found in nature. The possibility of alternative, but unactualized, realizations is regarded as uninteresting because it is taken to be a question of pure logic or an unverifiable scenario of science fiction. However, in the biological context only a contingent set of realizations is actualized. Drawing on recent work on the theory of neutral biological spaces, the article shows that we can have ways of assessing the modal dimension of multiple realizability that do not have to rely on mere conceivability.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Estefanía López Salas;
    Publisher: F1000 Research Limited
    Project: EC | rurALLURE (101004887)

    The H2020 project rurAllure, “Promotion of rural museums and heritage sites in the vicinity of European pilgrimage routes” (2021-2023) aims to enrich pilgrims’ experiences with the creation of meaningful cultural products focused on the lesser-known heritage sites of rural areas that are not found on pilgrimage routes, but in their surroundings. One of the project goals is to create contents and narratives to be offered to pilgrims over successive days with the integration of state-of-the-art technology. This way, hidden rural heritage will be discoverable and pilgrims will have the opportunity to actively engage with rural places nearby, their local communities, identity, and culture. The latter will no longer be passive witnesses, but active participants in transnational networks of shared history and living heritage. The rurAllure project aims to develop a new concept of mobile guide for pilgrims that will present rural heritage sites and activities of interest along with information of transportation and accommodation to help movement from and back to pilgrimage routes, as well as cohesive narratives to be consumed along the way, focused on four pilots: literary heritage on the ways to Santiago de Compostela, thermal heritage and others on the ways to Rome, ethnographic heritage on the ways to Trondheim, and natural heritage on the ways to Csíksomlyó. To facilitate the pilots’ brainstorming in the creation of multimedia contents, we developed a review of narrative models on cultural heritage storytelling. In this paper, we present the results, a collection of 22 case studies we analyzed with a common structure, from which six distinctive groups of narrative practices emerge: sound-walks, wearable guides, context-aware games, simulations, digital exhibitions, and cultural wayfinding. All cases studies disrupt traditional notions of storytelling consumption and foster new relationships between people and places of interest that may lead to advancements in the pilgrimage context.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Sánchez, Antonio;
    Publisher: Editorial CSIC
    Country: Spain
    Project: EC | RUTTER (833438)

    The voyages of exploration and discovery during the period of European maritime expansion and the immense amount of information and artefacts they produced about our knowledge of the world have maintained a difficult, if not non-existent, relationship with the main historiographical lines of the history of early modern science. This article attempts to problematize this relationship based on a historical account that seeks to highlight the scientific and institutional mechanisms that made the Magellan-Elcano voyage, the first modern voyage, possible. The text argues that this voyage was the first modern voyage because it allowed the construction of a new scientific and cartographic image of the globe and contributed to our understanding of the world as a global world, altering the foundations on which modern European economic and geographic thought was based. In that sense, the voyage was something extraordinary, but not completely unexpected. It responded to a complex process of expansionary policy and technical development that dated back to the 15th century, which in 1519 was sufficiently articulated to carry out a great feat Construyendo una imagen global del mundo: ciencia, cosmografía y navegación en tiempos de la primera circunnavegación, 1492-1522.— Los viajes de exploración y de descubrimiento de la época de la expansión marítima europea y la enorme cantidad de información y artefactos que produjeron sobre nuestro conocimiento del mundo han mantenido una difícil relación, por no decir inexistente, con las principales líneas historiográficas de la historia de la ciencia moderna. Este artículo intenta problematizar dicha relación a partir de un relato histórico que pretende destacar los mecanismos científicos e institucionales que hicieron posible el viaje de Magallanes-Elcano, el primer viaje moderno. El texto sostiene que este viaje fue el primer viaje moderno no solo porque permitió la construcción de un mapa global del mundo, de una nueva imagen científica y cartográfica del globo, sino porque además contribuyó a nuestra comprensión del mundo como un mundo global, alterando los cimientos sobre los que se sustentaba el pensamiento económico y geográfico de la Europa moderna. En ese sentido, el viaje fue algo extraordinario, pero no completamente inesperado. Respondía a un complejo proceso de política expansionista y desarrollo técnico que se remontaba al siglo XV y que en 1519 estaba lo suficientemente articulado como para llevar a cabo una gran gesta

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Tommaso Trillo; Limor Shifman;
    Publisher: University of Illinois Libraries
    Project: EC | DigitalValues (819004)

    Memes are efficient tools for far-right activism. They also offer a window into the reactionary values expressed by far-right constituents in digital spheres. In this paper, we conceptualize memes as a meeting place between the values of the far-right and the values characterizing memetic communication on social media. We examined this process through the lens of Schwartz’s theory of basic human values and a case study from Italy. Specifically, we focus on a photo-based meme genre that we named “alternative calendar commemorations.” These memes memorialize events or figures that are key to the imaginary of the far-right. As expected, we found strong appeals to collectivistic values such as patriotism and tradition. However, we also found a partial re-negotiation of the collectivistic values of the far-right through some of the individualistic values intrinsic to memes. In conclusion, we discuss the implications of this new amalgamation between context-specific far-right values and those embedded in the globalizing format of digital memes.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Christian Ost; Ruba Saleh;
    Publisher: SpringerOpen
    Project: EC | CLIC (776758)

    AbstractThe COVID-19 pandemic has led to a current global health crisis with dreadful repercussions all over the world. A global economic recession is anticipated, with strong impacts in all economic and social sectors, including the cultural sector. Although all sub sectors will be impacted (heritage sites, theatres, museums, operas, art galleries), the cultural built heritage is particularly at stake, as it relies on multiple stakeholders through a wide range of heritage-related activities (tourism, recreation, housing, real estate, construction, craftsmanship, etc.). Sites management and heritage conservation have not only been vulnerable to strong economic and social disruptions, like most of other cultural fields, but have been greatly challenged because heritage values and the paradigm of conservation (50 years after adoption of the UNESCO convention) are being themselves revisited in the perspective of the Sustainable Development Goals. The paper aims also to consider cultural heritage as part of the Cultural and Creative Sectors (CCS) and how creativity and innovation contribute to post-COVID recoveries through Schumpeter-related creative destruction process. The current crisis might be perceived in a perspective of long wave theory of innovations and economic growth. The economic history is filled with many examples of such transition period when inventions, innovations, and growth reactivate the economic development in an upward long-term trend. In such framework, crisis can trigger innovation and creativity and can be understood as opportunity to increase the CCS resilience and sustainability, as well as harness the universality and the power of creativity. Finally, the paper aims to describe implications of such situation by providing to the CCS ways to learn and experience cultural entrepreneurship, resilient strategies, new sustainable and circular business models applied to the cultural heritage sector and its conservation.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Maximilian Haas; Laëtitia Mongeard; L. Ulrici; Laetitia D'Aloïa; Agnès Cherrey; Robert Galler; Michael Benedikt;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: France
    Project: EC | FCCIS (951754)

    The European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) is a world-wide leading organisation in the field of particle physics and operation of high-class particle accelerators. Since 2013, CERN has undertaken feasibility investigations for a particle accelerator, named Future Circular Collider (FCC) to be installed within a 90–100 km subsurface infrastructure likely to enter construction phase after 2030. An important aspect of its construction and environmental impact assessment is the management of approximately 9.1 million m3 of excavated rock and soil. The aim of this paper is to thoroughly review the applications of excavated material across European subsurface construction projects from a technical point of view and set them into context with studies currently ongoing for FCC. We propose a conceptual flow model for rock characterisation with respect to both applicability of excavated material and tunnelling excavation techniques for future international subsurface construction projects. The review has revealed a vast and encouraging potential across different European construction sites efficiently using excavated rock and soil over the past decade ranging from concrete production, geopolymer production, embankment and landfilling. Examples of reviewed subsurface tunnelling projects are likely to be applied for FCC including concrete production, clay-sealing for embankments, geopolymer face stabilization, recultivation or agricultural usage as mixed soil material or sustainable waste disposal.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Evola Gianpiero; Margani Giuseppe; Costanzo Vincenzo; Tardo Carola; Marino Edoardo Michele; Semprini Giovanni; Tomasi Roberto; Halmdienst Christian; Voortman Bart;
    Publisher: IOP Publishing
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | e-SAFE (893135)

    In the framework of the ongoing four-year EU-funded innovation project called e-SAFE (“Energy and seismic affordable renovation solutions”), several solutions for the energy and seismic deep renovation of reinforced concrete (RC) framed buildings in the European countries are going to be developed and demonstrated. These solutions address both the energy performance of the building envelope and the heating and cooling of the indoor spaces, and aim to be prefabricated, customizable, low-disruptive and sustainable in order to boost the decarbonisation of the largely inefficient European building stock. This paper presents the main features of the e-SAFE solutions and the results of a preliminary analysis to verify their effectiveness and compliance with European legislation and standards. The outcomes will be useful for the design and demonstration stage, by identifying issues that need to be tackled. This file corresponds to the pre-prints of the paper presented to the Conference

  • Open Access English

    Although lexical borrowing is an important aspect of language evolution, there have been few attempts to automate the identification of borrowings in lexical datasets. Moreover, none of the solutions which have been proposed so far identify borrowings across multiple languages. This study proposes a new method for the task and tests it on a newly compiled large comparative dataset of 48 South-East Asian languages from Southern China. The method yields very promising results, while it is conceptually straightforward and easy to apply. This makes the approach a perfect candidate for computer-assisted exploratory studies on lexical borrowing in contact areas.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ahmed Hamdi; Elvys Linhares Pontes; Emanuela Boros; Thi Tuyet Hai Nguyen; Günter Hackl; Jose G. Moreno; Antoine Doucet;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: EC | NewsEye (770299)

    International audience; Named entity processing over historical texts is more and more being used due to the massive documents and archives being stored in digital libraries. However, due to the poor annotated resources of historical nature, information extraction performances fall behind those on contemporary texts. In this paper, we introduce the development of the NewsEye resource, a multilingual dataset for named entity recognition and linking enriched with stances towards named entities. The dataset is comprised of diachronic historical newspaper material published between 1850 and 1950 in French, German, Finnish, and Swedish. Such historical resource is essential in the context of developing and evaluating named entity processing systems. It evenly allows enhancing the performances of existing approaches on historical documents which enables adequate and efficient semantic indexing of historical documents on digital cultural heritage collections.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Stéphanie Bertrand; Stéphanie Bertrand; Martha Vassiliadi; Paul Zikas; Efstratios Geronikolakis; George Papagiannakis; George Papagiannakis;
    Project: EC | UViMCA (893454)

    The primary mission of cultural institutions, including heritage sites and museums, is to perform and perpetuate Cultural Heritage (CH) by ideally transforming audiences into stewards of that heritage. In recent years, these institutions have increasingly turned to Mixed Reality (MR) technologies to expand and democratize public access to Cultural Heritage - a trend that is called upon to accelerate with COVID-19 - because these technologies provide opportunities for more remote outreach, and moreover, can make partial remains or ruins more relatable to the public. But as emerging evaluations indicate, existing MR intangible and tangible Digital Cultural Heritage (DCH) applications are largely proving inadequate to engaging audiences beyond an initial fascination with the immersive 3D visualization of heritage sites and artefacts owing in part to misguided storytelling or non-compelling narratives. They fail to effectively communicate the significance of Cultural Heritage to audiences and impress upon them its value in a lasting way due to their overreliance on an education-entertainment-touristic consumption paradigm. Building on the recent case made for Literature-based MR Presence, this article examines how the literary tradition of travel narratives can be recruited to enhance presence and embodiment, and further elicit aesthetic experiences in Digital Cultural Heritage applications by drawing on recent findings from the fields of Extended Reality (XR), cognitive literary science and new museology. The projected effects of this innovative approach are not limited to an increase in audience engagement on account of a greater sense of presence and embodiment. This approach is also expected to prompt a different kind of public involvement characterized by a personal valuation of the heritage owing to aesthetic experience. As the paper ultimately discusses, this response is more compatible both with MR applications' default mode of usership, and with newly emerging conceptions of a user-centered museum (e.g., the Museum 3.0), thereby providing a narrative roadmap for future Virtual Museum (VM) applications better suited to the primary mission of transmitting and perpetuating Cultural Heritage. © Bertrand, Vassiliadi, Zikas, Geronikolakis and Papagiannakis.