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3 Research products, page 1 of 1

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
  • Publications
  • Research data
  • Other research products
  • 2017-2021
  • 05 social sciences
  • 050905 science studies
  • European Commission
  • EU
  • IT
  • Scientometrics
  • Archivio della ricerca- Università di Roma La Sapienza

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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Kun Sun; Haitao Liu; Wenxin Xiong;
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC
    Project: EC | WIDE (742545), EC | WIDE (742545)

    AbstractScientific writings, as one essential part of human culture, have evolved over centuries into their current form. Knowing how scientific writings evolved is particularly helpful in understanding how trends in scientific culture developed. It also allows us to better understand how scientific culture was interwoven with human culture generally. The availability of massive digitized texts and the progress in computational technologies today provide us with a convenient and credible way to discern the evolutionary patterns in scientific writings by examining the diachronic linguistic changes. The linguistic changes in scientific writings reflect the genre shifts that took place with historical changes in science and scientific writings. This study investigates a general evolutionary linguistic pattern in scientific writings. It does so by merging two credible computational methods: relative entropy; word-embedding concreteness and imageability. It thus creates a novel quantitative methodology and applies this to the examination of diachronic changes in the Philosophical Transactions of Royal Society (PTRS, 1665–1869). The data from two computational approaches can be well mapped to support the argument that this journal followed the evolutionary trend of increasing professionalization and specialization. But it also shows that language use in this journal was greatly influenced by historical events and other socio-cultural factors. This study, as a “culturomic” approach, demonstrates that the linguistic evolutionary patterns in scientific discourse have been interrupted by external factors even though this scientific discourse would likely have cumulatively developed into a professional and specialized genre. The approaches proposed by this study can make a great contribution to full-text analysis in scientometrics.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Camil Demetrescu; Andrea Ribichini; Marco Schaerf;
    Publisher: Springer Verlag
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | SecondHands (643950)

    We investigate the accuracy of how author names are reported in bibliographic records excerpted from four prominent sources: WoS, Scopus, PubMed, and CrossRef. We take as a case study 44,549 publications stored in the internal database of Sapienza University of Rome, one of the largest universities in Europe. While our results indicate generally good accuracy for all bibliographic data sources considered, we highlight a number of issues that undermine the accuracy for certain classes of author names, including compound names and names with diacritics, which are common features to Italian and other Western languages.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jose Camacho-Collados; Claudio Delli Bovi; Alessandro Raganato; Roberto Navigli;
    Publisher: Springer Netherlands
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | MOUSSE (726487)

    Definitional knowledge has proved to be essential in various Natural Language Processing tasks and applications, especially when information at the level of word senses is exploited. However, the few sense-annotated corpora of textual definitions available to date are of limited size: this is mainly due to the expensive and time-consuming process of annotating a wide variety of word senses and entity mentions at a reasonably high scale. In this paper we present SenseDefs, a large-scale high-quality corpus of disambiguated definitions (or glosses) in multiple languages, comprising sense annotations of both concepts and named entities from a wide-coverage unified sense inventory. Our approach for the construction and disambiguation of this corpus builds upon the structure of a large multilingual semantic network and a state-of-the-art disambiguation system: first, we gather complementary information of equivalent definitions across different languages to provide context for disambiguation; then we refine the disambiguation output with a distributional approach based on semantic similarity. As a result, we obtain a multilingual corpus of textual definitions featuring over 38 million definitions in 263 languages, and we publicly release it to the research community. We assess the quality of SenseDefs’s sense annotations both intrinsically and extrinsically on Open Information Extraction and Sense Clustering tasks.