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75 Research products, page 1 of 8

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dutton, Andrea; Villa, Alexandra; Chutcharavan, Peter M.;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: NSF | CIF21 DIBBs: Collaborativ... (1443037), NSF | Collaborative Research: P... (1702740)

    This is a compilation of stratigraphic constraints and relevant U-series ages from the Last Interglacial period taken from samples in the Bahamas, Turks and Caicos, and the east coast of Florida, USA. It has been exported from the World Atlas of Last Interglacial Shorelines (WALIS) database (https://warmcoasts.eu/world-atlas.html).

  • Research data . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Bolun "Namir" Xia; Vipula D. Rawte; Aparna Gupta; Mohammed J. Zaki;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: NSF | III: EAGER: Knowledge Gra... (1738895)

    These two .csv files contain the US bank dataset for FETILDA, containing sections of 10-K reports submitted by US banks from 2006 to 2016. They are directly used by the Python scripts for training, validation, and testing. There are two files, one for Item 1A of the 10-K reports, and the other for Item 7/7A.

  • Research data . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Bolun "Namir" Xia; Vipula D. Rawte; Aparna Gupta; Mohammed J. Zaki;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: NSF | III: EAGER: Knowledge Gra... (1738895)

    These seven .csv files contain the logarithms of the stock return volatitilies, as well as the MDA sections of the FIN10K dataset used to replicate the experiment done in Tsai and Wang (2017), but for FETILDA. They are directly used by the Python scripts for training, validation, and testing. Among them, train-results.csv is used for training and testing, and the rest of the six .csv files are used for testing for the years 2001-2006, respectively.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lilien, David; Steinhage, Daniel; Taylor, Drew; Yan, Jie-Bang; O'Neill, Charles; Miller, Heinrich; Gogineni, Prasad; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Eisen, Olaf;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: NSF | EAGER: L-Band Radar Ice S... (1921418)

    These are ice-penetrating radar data connecting the newly chosen Beyond EPICA Little Dome C core site to the EPICA Dome C core site, collected in late 2019. These data are presented in a paper in The Cryosphere (https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2020-345), where full processing and collection methods are described. Data collection and processing Data were collected using a new very high frequency (VHF) radar, built by the Remote Sensing Center at the University of Alabama (Yan et al., 2020). The system transmitted 8 us chirps, with peak transmit power of 125--250 W per channel, at 200 MHz center frequency and 60 MHz bandwidth. There were 5--8 operational channels at various points. The antennas were pulled behind a tracked vehicle, with controlling electronics in the rear of the vehicle. Data were collected at travel speeds of 2--3.5 m/s. Data processing consisted of coherent integration (i.e. unfocused SAR), pulse compression, motion compensation (by tracking internal horizons), coherent channel combination, and de-speckling using a median filter. Two-way travel time was converted to depth assuming a correction of 10 m of firn-air and a constant radar wave speed of 168.5 m/us (e.g., Winter et al., 2017). After other processing was complete, different radargrams were spliced together to create a continuous profile extending from EPICA Dome C to the Beyond EPICA Little Dome C core site, and then the data were interpolated to have constant, 10-m horizontal spacing. The re-interpolated data were used for horizon tracing, which was done semi-automatically to follow amplitude peaks between user-defined clicks. For the bed reflection, we always picked the first notable return in the region of the bed. File description The file format is hdf5, which can be read with many programming languages. There are three groups in the file: processed_data, picks, and geographic_information. The processed_data gives the return power matrix (dB), and the depth (m) and two-way travel time (us) for the fast-time dimension. The picks give the depths (m) of different reflecting horizons traced in the corresponding paper. Ages and age uncertainties (kyr), interpolated from the AICC2012 timescale, are included as attributes on each pick. Bed and basal unit picks are included (ageless). The geographic_information gives latitude and longitude (decimal degrees), and the distance along-profile (km). References Bazin, L., Landais, A., Lemieux-Dudon, B., Toyé Mahamadou Kele, H., Veres, D., Parrenin, F., Martinerie, P., Ritz, C., Capron, E., Lipenkov, V., Loutre, M. F., Raynaud, D., Vinther, B., Svensson, A., Rasmussen, S. O., Severi, M., Blunier, T., Leuenberger, M., Fischer, H., Masson-Delmotte, V., Chappellaz, J., and Wolff, E.: An optimized multi-proxy, multi-site Antarctic ice and gas orbital chronology (AICC2012): 120-800 ka, 9, 1715–1731, https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-9-1715-2013, 2013. Winter, A., Steinhage, D., Arnold, E. J., Blankenship, D. D., Cavitte, M. G. P., Corr, H. F. J., Paden, J. D., Urbini, S., Young, D. A., and Eisen, O.: Comparison of measurements from different radio-echo sounding systems and synchronization with the ice core at Dome C, Antarctica, 11, 653–668, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-11-653-2017, 2017. Yan, J.-B., Li, L., Nunn, J. A., Dahl-Jensen, D., O’Neill, C., Taylor, R. A., Simpson, C. D., Wattal, S., Steinhage, D., Gogineni, P., Miller, H., and Eisen, O.: Multiangle, Frequency, and Polarization Radar Measurement of Ice Sheets, 13, 2070–2080, https://doi.org/10.1109/JSTARS.2020.2991682, 2020. These data were generated in the frame of Beyond EPICA. The project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No. 815384 (Oldest Ice Core). It is supported by national partners and funding agencies in Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, The Netherlands and the United Kingdom. Logistic support is mainly provided by PNRA and IPEV through the Concordia Station system. The radar shipment and personnel transportation to Antarctica were provided by U.S. NSF under grant 1921418, which also partly supported the development of the VHF radar. Radar development was further supported by internal funding from the University of Alabama. DL and DDJ were partially supported by the Villum Foundation (grant number 16572). Any opinions expressed and arguments employed herein do not necessarily reflect the official views of the European Union funding agency or other national funding bodies.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Opitz, Rachel; Christie, Heather; Bagley, Joseph; Pulsen, Jennifer; SPARC Project;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: NSF | Expanding Collaborative O... (1321443)

    SPARC Project: BostonFingerprints_2014 Principle Investigators: Joseph Bagley and Jennifer Poulsen Contributors: Rachel Opitz (SPARC) Joseph Bagley and Jennifer Poulsen (Boston Landmarks Commission) and Rachel Opitz (SPARC researcher) used a structured light scanner to create detailed 3D models of ceramic artifacts featuring finger and hand prints from the Parker-Harris Pottery Site and Three Cranes tavern Site in Charlestown, Massachusetts. These sites were excavated in the early- and mid-1980s in advance of Boston’s Big Dig as part of the Central Artery North Area, and are now listed in the National Register of Historic Places as part of the City Square Archaeological District. The Parker-Harris Pottery Site was the location of early coarse earthenware (redware) ceramic production in Boston. It was destroyed on June 17, 1775 by British troops who burned Charlestown as part of the Battle of Bunker Hill. The Three Cranes Tavern was founded in the former Great House of Governor John Winthrop in the center of Charlestown, only 100 meters from the Parker-Harris property. The tavern passed through a series of owners resulting in a near-continual use of the property as a Tavern for 140 years. During archaeological investigation numerous privies and features were identified with tightly-dated ceramic assemblages, including numerous coarse earthenwares with the distinct decorative elements of the Parker or Harris pottery. This project aimed to establish that biometric identifiers directly connect pottery from consumption sites to production sites when there are known sales between production and consumption sites, tightly dated deposits that limit association of pottery to specific potters, and a limited number of potters producing these vessels. This type of research could establish previously-unknown associations and commercial networks of domestic redware potters across the eastern United States. With data as unique and personal as a fingerprint, the results of this analysis brings a personal and evocative light to these significant assemblages, allowing the public to appreciate these forgotten and sometimes nameless potters through the intimate association of their hands. This project includes raw and processed data captured using a Breuckmann Smartscan HE structured light scanner with 250mm lenses using Optocat 2013 software. Sixty ceramics were scanned - 30 from Parker-Harris Kiln and 30 from Three Cranes Tavern. This upload contains the processed STL meshes for Parker-Harris 30 specifically (PH30) due to corruption in the file originally uploaded to this archive. PLEASE NOTE: The original upload of STL files for PH 25 was corrupted. Due to Zenodo's publishing policies, we cannot alter the upload here. If you would like the STL files for PH25, please use this file instead of that in BostonFingerprints2014_ProcessedSTLmeshes Project Name: Boston Fingerprints Survey Location: City of Boston Archaeology Laboratory Survey Dates: 20 - 24 October 2014 Scanner Details: Breuckmann Smartscan HE structured light scanner - 250mm lenses Operator Name: Rachel Opitz Calibration Files: BostonFingerprints2014_RawData_Calib2 Total Number of Scans: 194 Total Number of STL meshes: 199 Final Datasets for Archive: Raw scan data from Optocat, STL meshes, and images of each ceramic (.pdf) Images from Survey: 388 Software: Optocat 2013

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Smithson, Brian C.;
    Publisher: Taylor & Francis
    Project: NSF | Doctoral Dissertation Res... (1423963)

    Based on ethnographic research in Southeastern Bénin, this article considers how the Yorùbá òrìs.à (divinity) Orò bolsters religious pluralism by manifesting only as sound. Synthesizing theory from sound studies and religious studies, the article shows how Orò and his followers demand religious tolerance from those who would reject the spirit, such as Christians who oppose African Indigenous religions. Key to this process is how Orò interacts with the material world, as a voice that blankets towns during his yearly festival. The sound ignores material barriers, such as the walls of houses, to bring blessings to all who hear it. Yet to safeguard Orò’s ability to bestow such boons, his followers threaten violence against anyone who would publicly betray the secrecy surrounding how Orò’s voice manifests. Thus, non-initiated men must be confined indoors and keep Orò’s secrets or face potentially horrible consequences. Meanwhile, Orò’s followers force these detractors to encounter the divinity anyway. Thus in crossing material barriers, Orò ensures that all who hear him participate in his festival while reinforcing social boundaries based upon how they do so—as a sacred and beneficent sound, or an affront that nevertheless demands their silence. Supplemental data for this article is available online at

  • Research data . 2021
    Authors: 
    Zinn, J.C.; Stello, D.; Elsworth, Y.; Garcia, R.A.; Kallinger, T.; Mathur, S.; Mosser, B.; Bugnet, L.; Jones, C.; Hon, M.; +11 more
    Publisher: Centre de Donnees Strasbourg (CDS)
    Project: NSF | Kavli Institute for Theor... (1748958)

    VizieR online Data Catalogue associated with article published in journal Astronomical Journal (AAS) with title 'The K2 Galactic Archaeology Program Data Release 2: asteroseismic results from campaigns 4, 6, and 7.' (bibcode: 2020ApJS..251...23Z)

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Macklin-Cordes, Jayden L.; Bowern, Claire; Round, Erich R.;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: ARC | Discovery Early Career Re... (DE150101024), NSF | Language as a Window on P... (1423711)

    Data, code and results for the paper Phylogenetic signal in phonotactics (Macklin-Cordes, Bowern & Round, 2021). Information and usage instructions are found in the readme.txt file and Section S3 of the paper's Supplementary Information.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Oborny, Stephan C.; Cramer, Bradley D.; Brett, Carlton E.;
    Publisher: Taylor & Francis
    Project: NSF | CAREER: The Quest for Pre... (1455030)

    Silurian strata within the tristate area of Indiana, Ohio, and Kentucky have been thoroughly studied for well over a century. Due to rapid facies changes throughout the region numerous lithostratigraphic terminologies were established, many of which were difficult to correlate even over short distances. Recently these stratigraphic complexities have received renewed interest due to advancements in bio-, chemo-, and sequence stratigraphy that greatly improved our understanding of the tristate area. These improvements had significant implications for our ability to correlate Rhuddanian through lower Sheinwoodian strata between the Appalachian and Illinois basins and allowed unified nomenclatural and sequence stratigraphic hierarchies for this interval to be developed across the Cincinnati Arch. Recent advancements in regional chronostratigraphy of Silurian strata, however, highlight several discrepancies with regards to the 3rd- and 4th-order sequence stratigraphic hierarchies assigned within these basins. In an effort to alleviate these points of disagreement, we contribute new δ13Ccarb chemostratigraphic and sequence stratigraphic analyses of a basinward Appalachian section from Scioto County, Ohio, spanning upper Telychian through Gorstian strata assigned to the Estill through Tymochtee formations, complemented by gamma-ray core scans for localities traversing northwestward from the sampled core section into western Ohio. These new data allow unified nomenclatural and sequence stratigraphic hierarchies to be developed throughout the region for strata spanning the upper Telychian through Gorstian stages. Additionally, these findings highlight a significant shift in the primary sites of sediment accommodation during the studied depositional interval.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Vahlenkamp, Maximilian; De Vleeschouwer, David; Batenburg, Sietske J; Edgar, Kirsty M; Hanson, C E; Martinez, Mathieu; Pälike, Heiko; MacLeod, Kenneth G; Li, Yong-Xiang; Richter, Carl; +4 more
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: NSF | Management and Operations... (1326927), EC | EARTHSEQUENCING (617462), UKRI | Exploring the roles of oc... (NE/R012350/1)

    The geologic time scale for the Cenozoic Era has been notably improved over the last decades by virtue of integrated stratigraphy, combining high-resolution astrochronologies, biostratigraphy and magnetostratigraphy with high-precision radioisotopic dates. However, the middle Eocene remains a weak link. The so-called "Eocene time scale gap" reflects the scarcity of suitable study sections with clear astronomically-forced variations in carbonate content, primarily because large parts of the oceans were starved of carbonate during the Eocene greenhouse. International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 369 cored a carbonate-rich sedimentary sequence of Eocene age in the Mentelle Basin (Site U1514, offshore southwest Australia). The sequence consists of nannofossil chalk and exhibits rhythmic clay content variability. Here, we show that IODP Site U1514 allows for the extraction of an astronomical signal and the construction of an Eocene astrochronology, using 3-cm resolution X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) core scans. The XRF-derived ratio between calcium and iron content (Ca/Fe) tracks the lithologic variability and serves as the basis for our U1514 astrochronology. We present a 16 million-year-long (40-56 Ma) nearly continuous history of Eocene sedimentation with variations paced by eccentricity and obliquity. We supplement the high-resolution XRF data with low-resolution bulk carbon and oxygen isotopes, recording the long-term cooling trend from the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM - ca. 56 Ma) into the middle Eocene (ca. 40 Ma). Our early Eocene astrochronology corroborates existing chronologies based on deep-sea sites and Italian land sections. For the middle Eocene, the sedimentological record at U1514 provides a single-site geochemical backbone and thus offers a further step towards a fully integrated Cenozoic geologic time scale at orbital resolution.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
75 Research products, page 1 of 8
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dutton, Andrea; Villa, Alexandra; Chutcharavan, Peter M.;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: NSF | CIF21 DIBBs: Collaborativ... (1443037), NSF | Collaborative Research: P... (1702740)

    This is a compilation of stratigraphic constraints and relevant U-series ages from the Last Interglacial period taken from samples in the Bahamas, Turks and Caicos, and the east coast of Florida, USA. It has been exported from the World Atlas of Last Interglacial Shorelines (WALIS) database (https://warmcoasts.eu/world-atlas.html).

  • Research data . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Bolun "Namir" Xia; Vipula D. Rawte; Aparna Gupta; Mohammed J. Zaki;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: NSF | III: EAGER: Knowledge Gra... (1738895)

    These two .csv files contain the US bank dataset for FETILDA, containing sections of 10-K reports submitted by US banks from 2006 to 2016. They are directly used by the Python scripts for training, validation, and testing. There are two files, one for Item 1A of the 10-K reports, and the other for Item 7/7A.

  • Research data . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Bolun "Namir" Xia; Vipula D. Rawte; Aparna Gupta; Mohammed J. Zaki;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: NSF | III: EAGER: Knowledge Gra... (1738895)

    These seven .csv files contain the logarithms of the stock return volatitilies, as well as the MDA sections of the FIN10K dataset used to replicate the experiment done in Tsai and Wang (2017), but for FETILDA. They are directly used by the Python scripts for training, validation, and testing. Among them, train-results.csv is used for training and testing, and the rest of the six .csv files are used for testing for the years 2001-2006, respectively.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lilien, David; Steinhage, Daniel; Taylor, Drew; Yan, Jie-Bang; O'Neill, Charles; Miller, Heinrich; Gogineni, Prasad; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Eisen, Olaf;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: NSF | EAGER: L-Band Radar Ice S... (1921418)

    These are ice-penetrating radar data connecting the newly chosen Beyond EPICA Little Dome C core site to the EPICA Dome C core site, collected in late 2019. These data are presented in a paper in The Cryosphere (https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2020-345), where full processing and collection methods are described. Data collection and processing Data were collected using a new very high frequency (VHF) radar, built by the Remote Sensing Center at the University of Alabama (Yan et al., 2020). The system transmitted 8 us chirps, with peak transmit power of 125--250 W per channel, at 200 MHz center frequency and 60 MHz bandwidth. There were 5--8 operational channels at various points. The antennas were pulled behind a tracked vehicle, with controlling electronics in the rear of the vehicle. Data were collected at travel speeds of 2--3.5 m/s. Data processing consisted of coherent integration (i.e. unfocused SAR), pulse compression, motion compensation (by tracking internal horizons), coherent channel combination, and de-speckling using a median filter. Two-way travel time was converted to depth assuming a correction of 10 m of firn-air and a constant radar wave speed of 168.5 m/us (e.g., Winter et al., 2017). After other processing was complete, different radargrams were spliced together to create a continuous profile extending from EPICA Dome C to the Beyond EPICA Little Dome C core site, and then the data were interpolated to have constant, 10-m horizontal spacing. The re-interpolated data were used for horizon tracing, which was done semi-automatically to follow amplitude peaks between user-defined clicks. For the bed reflection, we always picked the first notable return in the region of the bed. File description The file format is hdf5, which can be read with many programming languages. There are three groups in the file: processed_data, picks, and geographic_information. The processed_data gives the return power matrix (dB), and the depth (m) and two-way travel time (us) for the fast-time dimension. The picks give the depths (m) of different reflecting horizons traced in the corresponding paper. Ages and age uncertainties (kyr), interpolated from the AICC2012 timescale, are included as attributes on each pick. Bed and basal unit picks are included (ageless). The geographic_information gives latitude and longitude (decimal degrees), and the distance along-profile (km). References Bazin, L., Landais, A., Lemieux-Dudon, B., Toyé Mahamadou Kele, H., Veres, D., Parrenin, F., Martinerie, P., Ritz, C., Capron, E., Lipenkov, V., Loutre, M. F., Raynaud, D., Vinther, B., Svensson, A., Rasmussen, S. O., Severi, M., Blunier, T., Leuenberger, M., Fischer, H., Masson-Delmotte, V., Chappellaz, J., and Wolff, E.: An optimized multi-proxy, multi-site Antarctic ice and gas orbital chronology (AICC2012): 120-800 ka, 9, 1715–1731, https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-9-1715-2013, 2013. Winter, A., Steinhage, D., Arnold, E. J., Blankenship, D. D., Cavitte, M. G. P., Corr, H. F. J., Paden, J. D., Urbini, S., Young, D. A., and Eisen, O.: Comparison of measurements from different radio-echo sounding systems and synchronization with the ice core at Dome C, Antarctica, 11, 653–668, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-11-653-2017, 2017. Yan, J.-B., Li, L., Nunn, J. A., Dahl-Jensen, D., O’Neill, C., Taylor, R. A., Simpson, C. D., Wattal, S., Steinhage, D., Gogineni, P., Miller, H., and Eisen, O.: Multiangle, Frequency, and Polarization Radar Measurement of Ice Sheets, 13, 2070–2080, https://doi.org/10.1109/JSTARS.2020.2991682, 2020. These data were generated in the frame of Beyond EPICA. The project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No. 815384 (Oldest Ice Core). It is supported by national partners and funding agencies in Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, The Netherlands and the United Kingdom. Logistic support is mainly provided by PNRA and IPEV through the Concordia Station system. The radar shipment and personnel transportation to Antarctica were provided by U.S. NSF under grant 1921418, which also partly supported the development of the VHF radar. Radar development was further supported by internal funding from the University of Alabama. DL and DDJ were partially supported by the Villum Foundation (grant number 16572). Any opinions expressed and arguments employed herein do not necessarily reflect the official views of the European Union funding agency or other national funding bodies.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Opitz, Rachel; Christie, Heather; Bagley, Joseph; Pulsen, Jennifer; SPARC Project;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: NSF | Expanding Collaborative O... (1321443)

    SPARC Project: BostonFingerprints_2014 Principle Investigators: Joseph Bagley and Jennifer Poulsen Contributors: Rachel Opitz (SPARC) Joseph Bagley and Jennifer Poulsen (Boston Landmarks Commission) and Rachel Opitz (SPARC researcher) used a structured light scanner to create detailed 3D models of ceramic artifacts featuring finger and hand prints from the Parker-Harris Pottery Site and Three Cranes tavern Site in Charlestown, Massachusetts. These sites were excavated in the early- and mid-1980s in advance of Boston’s Big Dig as part of the Central Artery North Area, and are now listed in the National Register of Historic Places as part of the City Square Archaeological District. The Parker-Harris Pottery Site was the location of early coarse earthenware (redware) ceramic production in Boston. It was destroyed on June 17, 1775 by British troops who burned Charlestown as part of the Battle of Bunker Hill. The Three Cranes Tavern was founded in the former Great House of Governor John Winthrop in the center of Charlestown, only 100 meters from the Parker-Harris property. The tavern passed through a series of owners resulting in a near-continual use of the property as a Tavern for 140 years. During archaeological investigation numerous privies and features were identified with tightly-dated ceramic assemblages, including numerous coarse earthenwares with the distinct decorative elements of the Parker or Harris pottery. This project aimed to establish that biometric identifiers directly connect pottery from consumption sites to production sites when there are known sales between production and consumption sites, tightly dated deposits that limit association of pottery to specific potters, and a limited number of potters producing these vessels. This type of research could establish previously-unknown associations and commercial networks of domestic redware potters across the eastern United States. With data as unique and personal as a fingerprint, the results of this analysis brings a personal and evocative light to these significant assemblages, allowing the public to appreciate these forgotten and sometimes nameless potters through the intimate association of their hands. This project includes raw and processed data captured using a Breuckmann Smartscan HE structured light scanner with 250mm lenses using Optocat 2013 software. Sixty ceramics were scanned - 30 from Parker-Harris Kiln and 30 from Three Cranes Tavern. This upload contains the processed STL meshes for Parker-Harris 30 specifically (PH30) due to corruption in the file originally uploaded to this archive. PLEASE NOTE: The original upload of STL files for PH 25 was corrupted. Due to Zenodo's publishing policies, we cannot alter the upload here. If you would like the STL files for PH25, please use this file instead of that in BostonFingerprints2014_ProcessedSTLmeshes Project Name: Boston Fingerprints Survey Location: City of Boston Archaeology Laboratory Survey Dates: 20 - 24 October 2014 Scanner Details: Breuckmann Smartscan HE structured light scanner - 250mm lenses Operator Name: Rachel Opitz Calibration Files: BostonFingerprints2014_RawData_Calib2 Total Number of Scans: 194 Total Number of STL meshes: 199 Final Datasets for Archive: Raw scan data from Optocat, STL meshes, and images of each ceramic (.pdf) Images from Survey: 388 Software: Optocat 2013

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Smithson, Brian C.;
    Publisher: Taylor & Francis
    Project: NSF | Doctoral Dissertation Res... (1423963)

    Based on ethnographic research in Southeastern Bénin, this article considers how the Yorùbá òrìs.à (divinity) Orò bolsters religious pluralism by manifesting only as sound. Synthesizing theory from sound studies and religious studies, the article shows how Orò and his followers demand religious tolerance from those who would reject the spirit, such as Christians who oppose African Indigenous religions. Key to this process is how Orò interacts with the material world, as a voice that blankets towns during his yearly festival. The sound ignores material barriers, such as the walls of houses, to bring blessings to all who hear it. Yet to safeguard Orò’s ability to bestow such boons, his followers threaten violence against anyone who would publicly betray the secrecy surrounding how Orò’s voice manifests. Thus, non-initiated men must be confined indoors and keep Orò’s secrets or face potentially horrible consequences. Meanwhile, Orò’s followers force these detractors to encounter the divinity anyway. Thus in crossing material barriers, Orò ensures that all who hear him participate in his festival while reinforcing social boundaries based upon how they do so—as a sacred and beneficent sound, or an affront that nevertheless demands their silence. Supplemental data for this article is available online at

  • Research data . 2021
    Authors: 
    Zinn, J.C.; Stello, D.; Elsworth, Y.; Garcia, R.A.; Kallinger, T.; Mathur, S.; Mosser, B.; Bugnet, L.; Jones, C.; Hon, M.; +11 more
    Publisher: Centre de Donnees Strasbourg (CDS)
    Project: NSF | Kavli Institute for Theor... (1748958)

    VizieR online Data Catalogue associated with article published in journal Astronomical Journal (AAS) with title 'The K2 Galactic Archaeology Program Data Release 2: asteroseismic results from campaigns 4, 6, and 7.' (bibcode: 2020ApJS..251...23Z)

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Macklin-Cordes, Jayden L.; Bowern, Claire; Round, Erich R.;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: ARC | Discovery Early Career Re... (DE150101024), NSF | Language as a Window on P... (1423711)

    Data, code and results for the paper Phylogenetic signal in phonotactics (Macklin-Cordes, Bowern & Round, 2021). Information and usage instructions are found in the readme.txt file and Section S3 of the paper's Supplementary Information.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Oborny, Stephan C.; Cramer, Bradley D.; Brett, Carlton E.;
    Publisher: Taylor & Francis
    Project: NSF | CAREER: The Quest for Pre... (1455030)

    Silurian strata within the tristate area of Indiana, Ohio, and Kentucky have been thoroughly studied for well over a century. Due to rapid facies changes throughout the region numerous lithostratigraphic terminologies were established, many of which were difficult to correlate even over short distances. Recently these stratigraphic complexities have received renewed interest due to advancements in bio-, chemo-, and sequence stratigraphy that greatly improved our understanding of the tristate area. These improvements had significant implications for our ability to correlate Rhuddanian through lower Sheinwoodian strata between the Appalachian and Illinois basins and allowed unified nomenclatural and sequence stratigraphic hierarchies for this interval to be developed across the Cincinnati Arch. Recent advancements in regional chronostratigraphy of Silurian strata, however, highlight several discrepancies with regards to the 3rd- and 4th-order sequence stratigraphic hierarchies assigned within these basins. In an effort to alleviate these points of disagreement, we contribute new δ13Ccarb chemostratigraphic and sequence stratigraphic analyses of a basinward Appalachian section from Scioto County, Ohio, spanning upper Telychian through Gorstian strata assigned to the Estill through Tymochtee formations, complemented by gamma-ray core scans for localities traversing northwestward from the sampled core section into western Ohio. These new data allow unified nomenclatural and sequence stratigraphic hierarchies to be developed throughout the region for strata spanning the upper Telychian through Gorstian stages. Additionally, these findings highlight a significant shift in the primary sites of sediment accommodation during the studied depositional interval.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Vahlenkamp, Maximilian; De Vleeschouwer, David; Batenburg, Sietske J; Edgar, Kirsty M; Hanson, C E; Martinez, Mathieu; Pälike, Heiko; MacLeod, Kenneth G; Li, Yong-Xiang; Richter, Carl; +4 more
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: NSF | Management and Operations... (1326927), EC | EARTHSEQUENCING (617462), UKRI | Exploring the roles of oc... (NE/R012350/1)

    The geologic time scale for the Cenozoic Era has been notably improved over the last decades by virtue of integrated stratigraphy, combining high-resolution astrochronologies, biostratigraphy and magnetostratigraphy with high-precision radioisotopic dates. However, the middle Eocene remains a weak link. The so-called "Eocene time scale gap" reflects the scarcity of suitable study sections with clear astronomically-forced variations in carbonate content, primarily because large parts of the oceans were starved of carbonate during the Eocene greenhouse. International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 369 cored a carbonate-rich sedimentary sequence of Eocene age in the Mentelle Basin (Site U1514, offshore southwest Australia). The sequence consists of nannofossil chalk and exhibits rhythmic clay content variability. Here, we show that IODP Site U1514 allows for the extraction of an astronomical signal and the construction of an Eocene astrochronology, using 3-cm resolution X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) core scans. The XRF-derived ratio between calcium and iron content (Ca/Fe) tracks the lithologic variability and serves as the basis for our U1514 astrochronology. We present a 16 million-year-long (40-56 Ma) nearly continuous history of Eocene sedimentation with variations paced by eccentricity and obliquity. We supplement the high-resolution XRF data with low-resolution bulk carbon and oxygen isotopes, recording the long-term cooling trend from the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM - ca. 56 Ma) into the middle Eocene (ca. 40 Ma). Our early Eocene astrochronology corroborates existing chronologies based on deep-sea sites and Italian land sections. For the middle Eocene, the sedimentological record at U1514 provides a single-site geochemical backbone and thus offers a further step towards a fully integrated Cenozoic geologic time scale at orbital resolution.