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11 Research products, page 1 of 2

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
  • Research data
  • Australian Research Council (ARC)
  • AU

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Wright, Nicky M.; Krause, Claire E.; Phipps, Steven J.; Boschat, Ghyslaine; Abram, Nerilie J.;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: ARC | ARC Future Fellowships - ... (FT160100029), ARC | Discovery Projects - Gran... (DP140102059), ARC | ARC Centres of Excellence... (CE170100023), ARC | Special Research Initiati... (SR200100008), ARC | ARC Future Fellowships - ... (FT160100029), ARC | Discovery Projects - Gran... (DP140102059), ARC | ARC Centres of Excellence... (CE170100023), ARC | Special Research Initiati... (SR200100008)

    This dataset accompanies Wright et al. (2022): Influence of long-term changes in solar irradiance forcing on the Southern Annular Mode, Climate of the Past. This dataset contains: Solar constant experiments: monthly files for sea level pressure (psl), surface stress east (tax), surface stress north (tay), screen temperature (tsc), and temperature at X pressure (t[0-18]) for solar constant experiments, specifically control S+1 S+3 S+7 S+35 S-3 S-7 S-15 Transient experiments: sea level pressure (psl) and screen temperature (tsc) files covering 1-2000 CE using: Steinhilber_x2 solar forcing (monthly files) Shapiro solar forcing (monthly files) These transient experiments are run as an Orbital-Greenhouse gases-Solar forcing experiment, and complement Phipps et al. (2013) (https://zenodo.org/record/3908927)

  • Authors: 
    Emmitt, Josh; Phillipps, Rebecca; Middleton, Stacey; Holdaway, Simon;
    Publisher: The University of Auckland
    Project: ARC | Predicting the Past: Time... (DP0557439)

    Images of stone artefacts from the Australian Western New South Wales Archaeological Program, and stone artefacts and rocks taken as part of the URU Fayum Project and Ahuahu Great Mercury Island Project. These images were used as part of a machine learning training project, which is cited as the resource title.

  • Authors: 
    Maloney, Tim Ryan;
    Publisher: SAGE Journals
    Project: ARC | ARC Future Fellowships - ... (FT170100025), ARC | Life ways of the first Au... (LP100200415)

    Supplemental material, sj-xlsx-1-hol-10.1177_09596836211033199 for Thirsty work: Testing the risk reduction model of mid- to late-Holocene stone points with distance decay from freshwater in northern Australia by Tim Ryan Maloney in The Holocene

  • Authors: 
    Rowe, Cassandra; O’Connor, Sue; Balme, Jane;
    Publisher: SAGE Journals
    Project: ARC | ARC Centres of Excellence... (CE170100015), ARC | Life ways of the first Au... (LP100200415)

    Supplemental material, Appendix_A_CGap1_stratigraphic_profile_Rowe_et_al for An examination of rockshelter palynology: Carpenter’s Gap 1, northwestern Australia by Cassandra Rowe, Sue O’Connor and Jane Balme in The Holocene

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Clark, Geoffrey;
    Publisher: Mendeley
    Project: ARC | The Power and Reach of Ch... (FT0990591), ARC | Discovery Projects - Gran... (DP160103778)

    Geochemical analysis of stone burial stones from Tonga using pXRF and LA-ICP-MS

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Missiaen, Lise;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: ARC | Discovery Projects - Gran... (DP180100048), EC | ACCLIMATE (339108)

    This dataset contains the model output from iLOVECLIM and its recently developed Pa/Th module for Pre-industrial equilibrium control run and Nordic Seas hosing experiments (freshwater addition in the Nordic Seas). The Pa/Th module computes the evolution of dissolved and particulate 231Pa and 230Th within the ocean model CLIO (3x3 degrees 20 vertical layers). For the Pre-Industrial control simulation, the dissolved and particulate 231Pa and 230Th activities are shown for the last 100 years of the equilibrium run (Figures 1, S1, S2). For the Nordic Seas hosing experiment (from Pre-Industrial equilibrium), the dataset contains the carbon isotopes and particulate Pa/Th responses and response times (as defined in Figure 2 - Figures 3, 4, S4, S5) as well as carbon isotopes and Pa/Th time series over the complete hosing simulation for 1) three selected locations in the Atlantic Basin (Figure 5) and the Bermuda rise (Figure 6).

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Lee, Michael S. Y.; Yates, Adam M.;
    Publisher: Dryad Digital Repository
    Country: Netherlands
    Project: ARC | Discovery Projects - Gran... (DP160103005), ARC | Discovery Projects - Gran... (DP160103005)

    Simultaneously analysing morphological, molecular and stratigraphic data suggests a potential resolution to a major remaining inconsistency in crocodylian evolution. The ancient, long-snouted thoracosaurs have always been placed near the Indian gharial Gavialis, but their antiquity (ca 72 Ma) is highly incongruous with genomic evidence for the young age of the Gavialis lineage (ca 40 Ma). We reconcile this contradiction with an updated morphological dataset and novel analysis, and demonstrate that thoracosaurs are an ancient iteration of long-snouted stem crocodylians unrelated to modern gharials. The extensive similarities between thoracosaurs and Gavialis are shown to be an almost ‘perfect storm’ of homoplasy, combining convergent adaptions to fish-eating, as well resemblances between genuinely primitive traits (thoracosaurs) and atavisms (Gavialis). Phylogenetic methods that ignore stratigraphy (parsimony and undated Bayesian methods) are unable to tease apart these similarities and invariably unite thoracosaurs and Gavialis. However, tip-dated Bayesian approaches additionally consider the large temporal gap separating ancient (thoracosaurs) and modern (Gavialis) iterations of similar long-snouted crocodyliforms. These analyses robustly favour a phylogeny which places thoracosaurs basal to crocodylians, far removed from modern gharials, which accordingly are a very young radiation. This phylogenetic uncoupling of ancient and modern gharial-like crocs is more consistent with molecular clock divergence estimates, and also the bulk of the crocodylian fossil record (e.g. all unequivocal gharial fossils are very young). Provided that the priors and models attribute appropriate relative weights to the morphological and stratigraphic signals—an issue that requires investigation—tip-dating approaches are potentially better able to detect homoplasy and improve inferences about phylogenetic relationships, character evolution and divergence dates. DataAndResultFilesThis is a zipped file containing (1) The stratigraphic dates and sources in folder TableS1-StratAges (2) the executable PAUP, MrBayes and BEAST files for the following analyses: Morphology Only Morphology and DNA Morphology and DNA (additional sensitivity analyses) Parsimony bootstrap partition frequencies (for all partitions, not just those found in the bootstrap consensus). The BEAST files were written for BEAST 1.8.2 and will need slight edits to run on BEAST 1.8.3 onwards. We have left the files “as is” as these represent the exact files and BEAST version used.Appendix1_includingTableS2Appendix 1 CONSTRUCTION OF THE MORPHOLOGICAL MATRIXAppendix2APPENDIX 2: PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSES AND RESULTSFigsS1-9_andCaptionsFigures S1 to S9 with captions

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Osth, Adam;
    Country: Netherlands
    Project: ARC | Discovery Early Career Re... (DE170100106)

    Data from Experiment 1, which manipulates list length between 24 and 96 items, normative word frequency (LF vs. HF), and the length of the retention interval.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Hill, Nathan W.; Garrett, Edward;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: ARC | Robust speech recognition... (DP1096348), ARC | Robust speech recognition... (DP1096348)

    This part-of-speech (POS) lexicon of Classical Tibetan was prepared in the course of the research project 'Tibetan in Digital Communication' (2012-2015) hosted at SOAS, University of London and funded by the UK's Arts and Humanities Research Council (grant code: AH/J00152X/1). The data for verbs comes from a digitized version of A Lexicon of Tibetan Verb Stems as Reported by the Grammatical Tradition (Munich: Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 2010) by Nathan W. Hill. Otherwise data comes from the manually part-of-speech tagged training data produced by the corpus and a few lexical items specifically added by hand to improve rule based tagging.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Perry, Conrad;
    Publisher: Taylor & Francis
    Project: ARC | Discovery Projects - Gran... (DP170101857)

    Both computational models of English reading that generate word stress predict a processing advantage for words with initial syllable stress. They differ, however, on whether they process words incrementally and learn nonlinear spelling-stress relationships. Two experiments using event-related potentials were used to investigate these predictions. The first examined trisyllabic stimuli. Differences found on P200 and N400 components suggested a processing advantage for words with initial syllable stress. The second examined root morphemes within words that have high frequency suffixes that are stress predictive. A processing advantage on the N400 component was found with root morphemes that typically have initial syllable stress, even when the whole-word stress pattern differed. This provides evidence that stress is generated incrementally, where it is assigned to parts of words as they are processed, and that stress assignment is not necessarily affected by high frequency nonlinear relationships.