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67 Research products, page 1 of 7

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
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  • 2013-2022
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  • English
    Authors: 
    Palomar, T.; Martínez-Weinbaum, Marina; Aparicio, Mario; Maestro-Guijarro, Laura; Castillejo, Marta; Oujja, M.;
    Publisher: DIGITAL.CSIC
    Country: Spain
    Project: EC | IPERION HS (871034)

    The study was undertaken in eleven flashed glass samples, provided by LambertsGlas® consisting of a colorless base glass covered by layers of different colors and thicknesses. This dataset consists of images of the samples; Laser-induced Breakdown Spectrocopy (LIBS) spectra; Laser-induced Fluorescence (LIF) spectra; Optical Microscopy (OM) images; UV-Vis-IR spectra and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) images and the assingment of the Energy-dispersive X-ray (EDS) analysis. This information allows characterizing the composition of both sides of the glasses and determining the chemilcal identification of chromophores responsible for the flashed glass coloration. Images are presented in JPG. All spectra are presented in cvs format, in a single page. Descriptions of the samples and the experimental conditions in which the spectra were taken and the name of the column values are included at the top of each page. For LIBS, 1 file per sample of elemental composition of the flashed glasses are included. Each file is composed of 2 columns (wavelength and intensity). For LIF, 1 file per sample of the analysis of fluorescent species of each flashed glass are included. Each file is composed of 2 columns (wavelength and intensity). For UV-Vis-IR spectroscopy, 1 file per sample of glass chromophores, just for the colored side. Each file is composed of 2 columns (wavelength and intensity). For FESEM-EDS, 2 files per sample. In the first one: "PHOTOS", 1 cross section image per sample is included. In the second group of files: "EDS", 1 file per sample of the assignment of the main elements. Each file is composed of 3 columns (the main elements, the results of the glass base and the colored layer in weight percentage, respectively). -- This dataset is subject to a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) License. There are 5 files which correspond to each technic employed for the analysis of the eleven different samples. The file title "PHOTOS" contains: Fig. 1_Flashedglasses_Photo; Fig. 2_OM_Photo. The file title “LIBS” contains: LIBS_Black-Baseglass; LIBS_Black-Coloredlayer; LIBS_Blue1-Baseglass; LIBS_Blue1-Coloredlayer; LIBS_Blue2-Baseglass; LIBS_Blue2-Coloredlayer; LIBS_Blue3-Baseglass; LIBS_Blue3-Coloredlayer; LIBS_Brown1-Baseglass; LIBS_Brown1-Coloredlayer; LIBS_Brown2-Baseglass; LIBS_Brown2-Coloredlayer; LIBS_Green1-Baseglass; LIBS_Green1-Coloredlayer; LIBS_Green2-Baseglass; LIBS_Green2-Coloredlayer; LIBS_Green3-Baseglass; LIBS_Green3-Coloredlayer; LIBS_Pink1-Baseglass; LIBS_Pink1-Coloredlayer; LIBS_Pink2-Baseglass; LIBS_Pink2-Coloredlayer. The file for “LIF” contains: LIF_Black-Baseglass; LIF_Black-Coloredlayer; LIF_Blue1-Baseglass; LIF_Blue1-Coloredlayer; LIF_Blue2-Baseglass; LIF_Blue2-Coloredlayer; LIF_Blue3-Baseglass; LIF_Blue3-Coloredlayer; LIF_Brown1-Baseglass; LIF_Brown1-Coloredlayer; LIF_Brown2-Baseglass; LIF_Brown2-Coloredlayer; LIF_Green1-Baseglass; LIF_Green1-Coloredlayer; LIF_Green2-Baseglass; LIF_Green2-Coloredlayer; LIF_Green3-Baseglass; LIF_Green3-Coloredlayer; LIF_Pink1-Baseglass; LIF_Pink1-Coloredlayer; LIF_Pink2-Baseglass; LIF_Pink2-Coloredlayer. For the “FESEM-EDS” there are two files inside. One title "EDS" which contains the documents: EDS_Black; EDS_Blue1; EDS_Blue2; EDS_Blue3; EDS_Brown1; EDS_Brown2; EDS_Brown2; EDS_Green1; EDS_Green2; EDS_Green3; EDS_Pink1; EDS_Pink2. And the other called "PHOTOS" which contains: FESEM_Black; FESEM_Blue1; FESEM_Blue2; FESEM_Blue3; FESEM_Brown1; FESEM_Brown2; FESEM_Green1; FESEM_Green2; FESEM_Green3; FESEM_Pink1; FESEM_Pink2. This is the experimental dataset used in the paper Appl. Sci., 12(11), 5760 (2022) (https://www.mdpi.com/2076-3417/12/11/5760). Flashed glasses are composed of a base glass and a thin colored layer and have been used since medieval times in stained glass windows. Their study can be challenging because of their complex composition and multilayer structure. In the present work, a set of optical and spectroscopic techniques have been used for the characterization of a representative set of flashed glasses commonly used in the manufacture of stained glass windows. The structural and chemical composition of the pieces were investigated by optical microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (FESEM-EDS), UV-Vis-IR spectroscopy, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). Optical microscopy and FESEM-EDS allowed the determination of the thicknesses of the colored layers, while LIBS, EDS, UV-Vis-IR, and LIF spectroscopies served for elemental, molecular, and chromophores characterization of the base glasses and colored layers. Results obtained using the micro-invasive LIBS technique were compared with those retrieved by the cross-sectional technique FESEM-EDS, which requires sample taking, and showed significant consistency and agreement. In addition, LIBS results revealed the presence of additional elements in the composition of flashed glasses that could not be detected by FESEM-EDS. The combination of UV-Vis-IR and LIF results allowed precise chemical identification of chromophores responsible for the flashed glass coloration. This research has been funded by the Spanish State Research Agency (AEI) through project PID2019-104124RB-I00/AEI/10.13039/501100011033, the Fundación General CSIC (ComFuturo Programme), by project TOP Heritage-CM (S2018/NMT-4372) from Community of Madrid, and by the H2020 European project IPERION HS (Integrated Platform for the European Research Infrastructure ON Heritage Science, GA 871034). Peer reviewed

  • English
    Authors: 
    Crespon-Ibáñez, Ana; Pérez, Gloria; Jiménez, José A.; Llorente, Irene; Martínez-Ramírez, S.; Cano, Emilio; Díaz, Iván;
    Publisher: DIGITAL.CSIC
    Country: Spain

    This research was funded by Agencia Estatal de Investigación, grant number BES-2015- 071472; Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad, project CREMEL II (HAR2014-54893-R); and by Comunidad de Madrid and European Structural and Investment Funds, project TOP-HERITAGE CM (S2018/NMT-4372) Peer reviewed

  • English
    Authors: 
    González-Esvertit, Eloy; Alcalde, Juan; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique;
    Publisher: Digital.CSIC
    Country: Spain

    The Iberian Evaporite Structure Database (IESDB) is the first overall assessment of evaporite structures developed in any region of the world. The IESDB is sourced from six different databases and more than 1,500 published and unpublished references, and includes information and figures for each of the 150 inventoried evaporite structures and their surrounding rocks. The database targets outcropping and buried diapirs, undeformed to slightly deformed evaporite successions, evaporite-cored anticlines, evaporite-detached thrusts, and allochthonous evaporite bodies. Compiled data include information about the stratigraphy, structure, event chronology, subsurface data availability, mining activity, and key bibliographic references of each indexed structure. The IESDB follows the FAIR principles of database management (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable) and is presented as an open access webpage (https://ub.edu/IESDB). This research initiative is funded by the Ramón y Cajal Fellowship RyC-2018-026335-I and Juan de la Cierva-Incorporación Fellowship IJC2018-036074-I (Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation (MCIN) / State Research Agency of Spain (AEI) / 10.13039/501100011033) / European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), the Knowledge Generation Research Project PID2020-118999GB-I00 (Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation (MCIN) / State Research Agency of Spain (AEI) / 10.13039/501100011033) and the Consolidated Research Group “Geologia Sedimentària” (2017SGR-824). DATA & FILE OVERVIEW 1. File List: 00_IESDB_Readme IESDB_Dataset1_Generic-Data IESDB_Dataset2_Mining-Data IESDB_Dataset3_Well-and-Seismic-Data IESDB_Dataset4_Geographic-Data IESDB_Dataset5_Quantitative-Data IESDB_Dataset6_Reference-Data IESDB_Dataset7_Image-Data IESDB_Summarized-Index-Cards 00_IESDB_Readme IESDB_Dataset1_Generic-Data IESDB_Dataset2_Mining-Data IESDB_Dataset3_Well-and-Seismic-Data IESDB_Dataset4_Geographic-Data IESDB_Dataset5_Quantitative-Data IESDB_Dataset6_Reference-Data IESDB_Dataset7_Image-Data IESDB_Summarized-Index-Cards Peer reviewed

  • English
    Authors: 
    Oujja, M.; Palomar, T.; Martínez-Weinbaum, Marina; Martínez-Ramírez, S.; Castillejo, Marta;
    Publisher: DIGITAL.CSIC
    Country: Spain
    Project: EC | IPERION HS (871034), EC | IPERION HS (871034)

    The study was undertaken in six medieval-like model glass samples UG (unaltered glass), MAK, MAR, MTA, MTB and MTN subjected to various environmental and atmospheric conditions in order to generate alteration layers of different characteristics. A potash-lime silicate glass, with composition similar to that of medieval glasses, was melted at 1400 °C during two hours, poured in a brass mould of rectangular cross section and annealed at 650 °C. The resulting glass ingot was cut in slices of around 10×10×2 mm3 and then polished using emery paper and an aqueous suspension of cerium oxide to obtain optical quality surfaces. Alteration of the glass slices was conducted by exposure to five different laboratory corrosion tests: SO2 corrosion for MAK sample, synthetic river water degradation for MAR, and degradation due to acid, basic and neutral medium for MTA, MTB and MTN, respectively. This dataset consists of images of the samples; Laser-induced Breakdown Spectrocopy (LIBS) spectra; Laser-induced Fluorescence (LIF) spectra; Optical Microscopy (OM); FT-Raman spectroscopy and Multi-Photon Excitation Fluorescence (MPEF) signals obtained with a Nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM). This information allows characterizing the composition of both body glass and determining the thickness of the degradation layer. Images are presented in JPG. All spectra are presented in cvs format, in a single page. Descriptions of the samples and the experimental conditions in which the spectra were taken and the name of the column values are included at the top of each page. For LIBS, 1 file per sample of elemental composition of the medieval-like glass are included. Each file is composed of 2 columns (wavelength and intensity). For LIF, 1 file per sample of the analysis of fluorescent species of each medieval-like glass are included. Each file is composed of 2 columns (wavelength and intensity). For NLOM, 2 files per sample. In the first one: “MPEF Safe limits”, each file is composed for 10 columns: 2 are for depth (µm) and 8 are for MPEF signal divided in two groups relating to the the power in the sample surface. In the second group of files: “MPEF profiles”, each file is composed for 4 columns: 1 is for depth (µm), 1 is the normalized MPEF intensity, 1 is the Lorentzian fit of depth (µm) and the last one Lorentzian fit. (The thicknesses of the degradation layers of the medieval-like glasses is calculated by the FWHM values of the fits after refractive index corrections). For FT-Raman, 1 file per sample of the analysis of the structure of the medieval-like glass through their vibrational modes is included. Each file is composed of 2 columns (Raman shift and intensity in arbitrary units). This dataset is subject to a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) License. This is the experimental dataset used in the paper Eur. Phys. Plus, 136:859 (2021) (http://hdl.handle.net/10261/248668). Historical glass-based objects undergo, since the time of their manufacture, different degradation phenomena that are related to their composition and to the environment to which they were exposed. Three-dimensional (3D) structural and chemical characterization of the degradation layers is important to select the most adequate conservation strategies for glass objects. Optical microscopy (OM) is the most frequently used non-destructive method to examine the surface of historical glasses; however, the 3D structural assessment of alteration layers requires applying the destructive modality of this technique to conduct a cross-sectional study. In this work, a different approach for structural and compositional characterization of alteration layers on model medieval-like glasses is presented, based on the combination of the laser spectroscopies of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and FT-Raman, and the emerging, cutting edge technique of nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM) in the modality of multiphoton excitation fluorescence (MPEF). The results obtained through this multi-analytical photonic approach were compared with those retrieved by examination of the surface and cross sections of the samples by OM and scanning electron microscopy–energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM–EDS). While the combination of LIBS, LIF and FT-Raman served to assess the composition of the various alteration layers, the use of MPEF microscopy allowed the non-destructive determination of the thicknesses of these layers, showing for both thickness and composition a good agreement with the OM and SEM–EDS results. Thus, the proposed approach, which avoids sample preparation, illustrates the capability of non-destructive, or micro-destructive in the case of LIBS, laser spectroscopies and microscopies for the in situ study of glass objects of historic or/and artistic value There are 4 files which correspond to each technic employed for the analysis of the six different samples. The file title “LIBS” contains: LIBS_UG; LIBS_MAK; LIBS_MAR; LIBS_MTA; LIBS_MTB; LIBS_MTN. The file for “LIF” contains: LIF_UG; LIF_MAK; LIF_MAR; LIF_MTA; LIF_MTB; LIF_MTN. The file for “FT-RAMAN” contains: FT-RAMAN_UG; FT-RAMAN_MAK; FT-RAMAN_MAR; FT-RAMAN_MTA; FT-RAMAN_MTB; FT-RAMAN_MTN. For the “MPEF” there are two files inside. One title “MPEF safe limits” which contains the documents: MPEF_MAK_SL; MPEF_MAR_SL; MPEF_MTA_SL; MPEF_MTB_SL; MPEF_MTN_SL. And the other called “MPEF profiles” which contains: MPEF_MAK_PROFILE; MPEF_MAR_PROFILE; MPEF _MTA_PROFILE; MPEF _MTB_PROFILE; MPEF _MTN_PROFILE. This research has been funded by the Spanish State Research Agency (AEI) through projects PID2019-104124RB-I00/AEI/1013039/501100011033, the CSIC General Foundation (ComFuturo Programme), by project TOP Heritage-CM (S2018/NMT-4372) from Community of Madrid, by the H2020 European project IPERION HS (Integrated Platform for the European Research Infrastructure ON Heritage Science, GA 871034). Support by CSIC Interdisciplinary Platform “Open Heritage: Research and Society” (PTI-PAIS) is acknowledged. M.O. thanks CSIC for a contract. The authors also thank M.A. Villegas and M. García Heras (Institute of History, CSIC) for fruitful discussions on historical glasses. Peer reviewed

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Giaime, Matthieu; Jol, Harry M.; Salmon, Yossi; López, Gloria I.; Abu Hamid, Amani; Bergevin, Logan; Bauman, Paul; McClymont, Alastair; Sailer-Haugland, Ethan; Artzy, Michal;
    Publisher: Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona
    Country: Spain

    Funding agency: United States-Israel Binational Science Foundation (Project number: 2016080) Unidad de excelencia María de Maeztu CEX2019-000940-M Excel file of the data (Magnetic susceptibility and faunal record) from sedimentary cores. The data are free to use for everyone interested.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Mentesana, Roberta Bruna; Buxeda i Garrigós, Jaume; Madrid i Fernández, Marisol;
    Publisher: Repositori de Dades de Recerca
    Project: EC | SPotEU (797242)

    Chemical characterization was conducted by means of wavelength Dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) analysis. The concentrations were quantified using an AxiosmAX-Advanced PANalytical spectrometer with a Rh excitation source calibrated by a suite of 56 international Geological Standards. Interferences were considered and the correction of matrix effects was done using PANanalytical Pro-Trace software for trace elements. The determined elements were: Na2O, MgO, Al2O3, SiO2, P2O5, K2O, CaO, TiO2, V, Cr, MnO, Fe2O3 (as total Fe), Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Sn, Ba, Ce, W, Pb and Th. Minor and major elements are expressed as concentrations of oxides in percentage by mass (wt %). Trace elements are conveyed as concentrations of elements in μg g-1. Samples are prepared according to a procedure explained in Madrid i Fernández, Marisol, and Alejandro G. Sinner. "Analysing technical choices: improving the archaeological classification of Late Republican Black Gloss pottery in north-eastern Hispania consumption centres." Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences 11, no. 7 (2019): 3155-3186. This dataset includes the chemical data obtained by wavelength Dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) analysis on sugar pots retrieved in Sicily from 11th-16th cent. AD contexts. These data were collected as part of the project “SPotEU: Sugar Pot manufacture in Western Europe in the medieval and post-medieval period (11th -16th centuries AD)”, funded under the Horizon 2020 Marie Skłodowska-Curie actions (grant agreement: 797242). The dataset also includes a file with a description of the charactersitics of each sample

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Mentesana, Roberta Bruna; Buxeda i Garrigós, Jaume; Madrid i Fernández, Marisol;
    Publisher: Repositori de Dades de Recerca
    Project: EC | SPotEU (797242)

    Sample preparation methodology: manual pressing of some of the received powder materials, by means of a glass plate to get a flat surface, in cylindrical standard sample holders of 16 or 27 millimeters of diameter and 2.5 millimeters of height. Instrument and experimental conditions: PANalytical X’Pert PRO MPD powder diffractometer in Bragg-Brentano θ/θ geometry of 240 millimeters of radius. Ni filtered Cu Kα radiation: λ = 1.5418 Å. Work power: 45 kV – 40 mA. Divergence slit of 0.5º. Mask defining a length of the beam over the sample in the axial direction of 12 millimeters. Incident and diffracted beam 0.04 radians Soller slits. Sample spinning at 2 revolutions per second PIXcel detector. Active length = 3.347 º. θ/2θ scan from 5 to 80 º2θ with step size of 0.026 º and measuring time of 100 seconds per step. This dataset includes the mineralogical data obtained by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses on sugar pots retrieved in Sicily from 11th-16th cent. AD contexts. These data were collected as part of the project “SPotEU: Sugar Pot manufacture in Western Europe in the medieval and post-medieval period (11th -16th centuries AD)”, funded under the Horizon 2020 Marie Skłodowska-Curie actions (grant agreement: 797242). The dataset also includes a file with a description of each sample.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Mentesana, Roberta Bruna;
    Publisher: Repositori de Dades de Recerca
    Project: EC | SPotEU (797242)

    Petrographic examination was performed on 30µ-thick thin-sections prepared as standard for ceramic analysis and observed on the petrographic microscope Olympus BX43P and the picture taken with the camera Olympus SC50. The photomicrographs show the section of the pots where the mineral and rock fragments can be identified. Fabrics are described and discussed in: Mentesana R., Hein A., Madrid i Fernàndez M., Kilikoglou V., Buxeda i Garrigòs J. 2022. “Think globally, act locally: global requirements and local transformation in sugar pots manufacture in Sicily in the medieval and post-medieval periods”. Minerals. The scalebar is located in the bottom-right corner of each photomicrograph. This dataset includes some of the petrographic pictures of the of sugar pots retrieved in Sicily from 11th-16th cent. AD contexts. These data were collected as part of the project “SPotEU: Sugar Pot manufacture in Western Europe in the medieval and post-medieval period (11th -16th centuries AD)”, funded under the Horizon 2020 Marie Skłodowska-Curie actions (https://cordis.europa.eu/project/id/797242). The dataset also includes a file with a description of the charactersitics of each sample.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Mentesana, Roberta Bruna; Buxeda I Garrig��s, Jaume; Madrid I Fern��ndez, Marisol;
    Publisher: Repositori de Dades de Recerca
    Project: EC | SPotEU (797242)

    SEM observations were performed on fresh cross-section fractures passing through the oro-aboral axis of the body wall in order to observe the microstructure. Bulk specimens were fixed on metal specimen stubs using silicone adhesive and the non-conductive ceramic specimens were made conductive. Colloidal silver paint was applied on excess silicone adhesive and lateral sides of ceramic bulk specimen. Then, the specimen surface was coated with a thin carbon film (~ 10 nm) by vacuum evaporation. The observations were made by using a FEI QUANTA 200 coupled with a microanalizer EDS: Thermo Ultradry – Pathfinder and photomicrograph taken at x1000, x2000 and x4000. The observations were performed using an acceleration voltage of 20 kV and a working distance of 10 mm. In a few cases, a JEOL J6510 coupled with an EDS Oxford Instruments Ultim Max – AZTecLive was used. The photomicrographs show the micromorphology of the pots, where the vitrification stages could be identified. The photomicrographs were taken at the bottom margin, core and the top margin of the ceramic section. Microstructures are described and discussed in: Mentesana R., Hein A., Madrid i Fernàndez M., Kilikoglou V., Buxeda i Garrigòs J. 2022. “Think globally, act locally: global requirements and local transformation in sugar pots manufacture in Sicily in the medieval and post-medieval periods”. Minerals. At the bottom of the photomicrographs, the image detection method (det), the accelerating voltage (HV), the working distance (WD), the magnification (mag) parameters and the scalebar could be found. Photomicrographs were taken at the CCiTUB of the Universitat de Barcelona. This dataset includes the microstructural data obtained by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) examination on sugar pots retrieved in Sicily from 11th-16th cent. AD contexts. These data were collected as part of the project “SPotEU: Sugar Pot manufacture in Western Europe in the medieval and post-medieval period (11th -16th centuries AD)”, funded under the Horizon 2020 Marie Skłodowska-Curie actions https://cordis.europa.eu/project/id/797242). The dataset also includes a file with a description of the charactersitics of each sample.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Hein, Anno; Mentesana, Roberta Bruna; Kilikoglou, Vasillis;
    Publisher: Repositori de Dades de Recerca
    Project: EC | SPotEU (797242)

    Two disks with a diameter of c. 30 mm were cut out of each wall fragment using a diamond coated cup-hole saw. The surfaces of the disks were polished afterwards in order to be flat and parallel with a thickness of 7 to 10 mm. The heat transfer properties were determined by means of the transient plane source (TPS) method (Log and Gustafsson 1995). For this, a Trident Thermal Conductivity Instrument was used (C-Therm Technologies Ltd.). A flexible TPS sensor with a diameter of 6 mm was placed between two disks of the same fragment in order to measure simultaneously thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and the specific heat capacity of the specimens. Each measurement was repeated five times in order to estimate the analytical uncertainty of the method. For determining the mechanical fracture strength of the specimens an INSTRON 1195 universal testing machine was used (Illinois Tool Works Inc.). The disks were tested by means of the biaxial flexure test (Shetty et al. 1980, 1983, Morrell 1998). For this, they were placed on a hollow steel cylinder with an inner diameter of c. 21.7 mm and a spherical steel indenter with 2.5 mm diameter was pressed in the in the centre of the disk with a speed of 0.1 mm/min. The increasing load was recorded until final fracture of the ceramic specimen. The fracture strength was estimated taking into account disk dimension, maximum load at fracture, size of supporting cylinder as well as the contact area between indenter and ceramic surface. This dataset includes the mechanical and thermal properties test data on sugar pots retrieved in Sicily from 11th-16th cent. AD contexts. These data were collected as part of the project “SPotEU: Sugar Pot manufacture in Western Europe in the medieval and post-medieval period (11th -16th centuries AD)”, funded under the Horizon 2020 Marie Skłodowska-Curie actions (https://cordis.europa.eu/project/id/797242). The dataset also includes a file with a description of each sample.