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142 Research products, page 1 of 15

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  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Lauland, Peter;
    Publisher: Umeå universitet, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier
    Country: Sweden
  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Bäcklund, Jan;
    Publisher: Aarhus University, Denmark
  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Wienberg, Jes;
    Publisher: Kungliga Vitterhets- historie- och antikvitetsakademien
    Country: Sweden

    Review of Owe Ronström, “Kulturarvspolitik. Visby från sliten småstad till medeltidsikon” (Stockholm 2008).

  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Wienberg, Jes;
    Publisher: Jysk Arkæologisk Selskab
    Country: Sweden
  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Juvas Marianne Liljas;
    Publisher: Umeå University
    Country: Sweden

    ”A new form of musical upbringing”: Pretenses of reform pedagogy content in the Siljan schoolIn this article, I describe the Siljan school in Tällberg as a Swedish example of alternative pedagogy. The overall questions relate to the reform pedagogy content of the school and its ability to give Swedish music teaching a new form of musical upbringing. An important issue is how the Siljan school as a model for Swedish reform has been inspired by the reform pedagogy movements in USA and Germany. The analysis is thus based on the Alm couple’s ability to give the school an international character which shines light on Swedish reforms in the greater context of reform pedagogy. With its basis in discursive education of the 1930s, two main questions are discussed: what perspective on musical education can be identified in the personal development ethos of the Siljan school? How can the school’s relation to the reform pedagogy music movement during the start of the 1900s be understood? From a hermeneutic perspective, the article contributes by investigating how the Siljan school can have affected decisions in education politics, Swedish schooling, and Swedish musical life. In summary, the article contributes with new knowledge on a chapter in the history of Swedish music pedagogy.

  • Publication . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . 2018
    Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Larsson, Lars;
    Country: Sweden
  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Jerry Määttä;
    Publisher: Svenska Barnboksinstitutet
    Country: Sweden

    The Swedish author Sven Wernstrom (b. 1925), mostly known for his political children’s and young adult fiction, is also one of the most prolific and widely read Swedish writers of science fiction (sf). His first attempts in the genre consisted of stray sf elements in some of his aviation novels on ‘‘Flygkamraterna’’ (‘‘The Flight Comrades’’, 1947-1957), and the fullblown sf novel Flygkamraterna korsar rymden (‘‘The Flight Comrades Cross Space’’, 1949), which depicts a trip to Mars and an encounter with an alien civilisation literally divided into different strata in their underground society. This study examines the transition from Wernstrom’s first aviation novels to his first sf novel, and studies the extent to which Wernstrom’s early science fiction makes use of the specific conventions of the genre. After a very brief survey of the history of sf in Sweden up until the 1950s, this study deals with the two novels Flygkamraterna (‘‘The Flight Comrades’’, 1947) and Flygkamraterna korsar rymden when it comes to their view on science and technology, their uses of technological speculation and futurological extrapolation, estrangement, and evocation of the sublime. It is commonly believed that Wernstrom’s writing didn’t really become political until the 1960s. One of the main conclusions of this study, however, is that already in his earliest science fiction from the late 1940s, Wernstrom makes ample use of the genre’s potential to conduct indirect social commentary. Keywords: Sven Wernstrom ; Science Fiction ; Aviation Novels ; Interplanetary Travel ; Mars ; Alien Life Forms (Published: 28 November 2012) Citation: Barnboken - tidskrift for barnlitteraturforskning/Journal of Children’s Literature Research, Vol. 35 , 2012 http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/clr.v35i0.19966

  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Bäcklund, Jan;
    Publisher: The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Denmark

    Med Orson Welles F for Fake undersøger vi, hvordan æstetisk kvalitet vil kunne indløses som kunstnerisk værdi. Hvis spørgsmålet er Elmyr de Hory, er svaret, at det koster intention og identitet. Orson Welles’ last film, F for Fake from 1973, not only doubles several figures from Clifford Irving’s biography of the forger Elmyr de Hory, the character ‘Orson Welles’ doubles the character ‘Elmyr de Hory’ as well in their common denominator as charlatans> Orson as a non-filming movie-maker, Elmyr as a non-artist painter and draughtsman. Whereas this for Orson was an intentional ambition in his film-making, it seems for Elmyr to have been an unintentional involutarism. As most artists, Elmyr strived for recognition of his own works under his own name. The problem was, however, that he did not have any real identity. With regard to quality, Hory could not really see the difference between a Modigliani portrait painted by Modigliani in 1910’s and another Modigliani portrait by Elmyr. This indifference towards the logic of artistic fame, established by different avantgardes, Hory probably had in common with all our lesser known artists, who thought that aesthetical qualities could be exchanged to artistic value. Elmyr’s paradoxical success – starting with Clifford Irving’s biography and Orson Welles’ film – illuminates a strategy for traditional or mediocre artists, to test artistic value, with a type of retrogardian chock-effect: reciprocal plagiarism.

  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Wienberg, Jes;
    Country: Sweden

    Romanesque round church towers - a Skandinavian perspective: The aim of the article is to discuss the interpretation of the Romanesque round church towers seen from a Scandinavian perspective. After a research history and a geographical outlook, which passes Ireland, England and Holstein, the article focusses on the 15-19 churches with round towers in medieaval Denmark, Sweden and Norway, with the main part in Southern Schleswig and Scania; none are known from Finland. The chronology and social context, function and meaning of the church towers are discussed. The Romanesque round church towers are also discussed in relation to the 33 known Romanesque round churches in the same area. Finally a catalogue of the round church towers in Scandinavia is presented. The theses of the article is, that the building material was not decisive for the choice of the round architecture, at least not in Scandinavia. The round church towers were unfortified burial memorials and bell towers, where the architecture, as was the case for the round churches, copied central church buildings in the West. In a period, where most churches were without a tower or had square towers, the round church towers were examples of a “conspicuous symbolism”. The initiative to build the round church towers must have been taken by an aristocracy, who participated or were inspired by the contemporary crusades at the Baltic Sea, and who used the towers in their mutual competition on status.Corrections in the pdf 2015.

  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Wicker, Nancy L.;
    Publisher: University of Oslo & Uppsala University
    Country: Sweden

    Runic inscriptions on Scandinavian Migration Period gold bracteates have long been considered problematic. Although many of them are readable, only a few are interpretable. One of the major questions about bracteate texts is whether they are related to the images depicted on the pieces. During the past quarter century, these inscriptions have been interpreted chiefly on the basis of Karl Hauck’s identification of the major figure depicted on bracteates as Odin. However, there are other interpretations of the pictures that may also assist our understanding of the texts. This paper examines some of these alternative explanations of bracteate imagery, with particular reference to how the objects were used and by whom, the aim being to arrive at a better understanding of the inscriptions.