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18 Research products, page 1 of 2

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Valentina Bartalesi; Carlo Meghini; Daniele Metilli;
    Publisher: Inderscience, [Olney] , Regno Unito
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | PARTHENOS (654119)

    Current Digital Libraries (DLs) are mostly built around large collections of scarcely related objects. We aim at enriching the information space of DLs by introducing narratives, consisting of two main components: networks of events related to one another and to the DL resources through semantic links, and narrations of those events in texts. In order to introduce narratives in DLs, we developed a conceptualisation based on narratology and we expressed it using the CIDOC CRM and CRMinf as reference ontologies. We used this expression to validate our conceptualisation, creating a narrative of the biography of Dante Alighieri as a realistic case study. To support this experiment, we developed a semi-automated tool that collects basic knowledge about objects and events from Wikidata. The developed ontology is general enough to be not limited to create biographies but other types of narratives as well.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Partarakis N.; Doulgeraki P.; Karuzaki E.; Adami I.; Ntoa S.; Metilli D.; Bartalesi V.; Meghini C.; Marketakis Y.; Kaplanidi D.; +2 more
    Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | Mingei (822336)

    In this article, the Mingei Online Platform is presented as an authoring platform for the representation of social and historic context encompassing a focal topic of interest. The proposed representation is employed in the contextualised presentation of a given topic, through documented narratives that support its presentation to diverse audiences. Using the obtained representation, the documentation and digital preservation of social and historical dimensions of Cultural Heritage are demonstrated. The implementation follows the Human-Centred Design approach and has been conducted under an iterative design and evaluation approach involving both usability and domain experts.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Arianna Gatta; Francesco Mattioli; Letizia Mencarini; Daniele Vignoli;
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | EU-FER (725961)

    The role of employment uncertainty as a fertility driver has previously been studied with a limited set of constructs, leading to inconclusive results. We address this oversight by considering perceived stability of employment and perceived resilience to potential job loss as two key dimensions of employment uncertainty in relation to fertility decision-making. The present study relies on the 2017 Italian Trustlab survey and its employment uncertainty module. We find that perception of resilience to job loss is a powerful predictor of fertility intentions, whereas perception of employment stability has only a limited impact. The observed relationship between resilience and fertility intentions is robust to the inclusion of person-specific risk attitude and does not depend on the unemployment rate or the share of fixed-term contracts in the area of residence. We conclude that the notion of employment uncertainty includes distinct expectations towards the future, which should be considered separately to understand fertility decision-making.Supplementary material for this article is available at: https://doi.org/10.1080/00324728.2021.1939406.

  • Publication . Article . Preprint . 2018 . Embargo End Date: 01 Jan 2017
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Firoj Alam; Morena Danieli; Giuseppe Riccardi;
    Publisher: arXiv
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | SENSEI (610916)

    Empathy, as defined in behavioral sciences, expresses the ability of human beings to recognize, understand and react to emotions, attitudes and beliefs of others. The lack of an operational definition of empathy makes it difficult to measure it. In this paper, we address two related problems in automatic affective behavior analysis: the design of the annotation protocol and the automatic recognition of empathy from spoken conversations. We propose and evaluate an annotation scheme for empathy inspired by the modal model of emotions. The annotation scheme was evaluated on a corpus of real-life, dyadic spoken conversations. In the context of behavioral analysis, we designed an automatic segmentation and classification system for empathy. Given the different speech and language levels of representation where empathy may be communicated, we investigated features derived from the lexical and acoustic spaces. The feature development process was designed to support both the fusion and automatic selection of relevant features from high dimensional space. The automatic classification system was evaluated on call center conversations where it showed significantly better performance than the baseline. Comment: Journal of Computer Speech and Language

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Carlo Meghini; Valentina Bartalesi; Daniele Metilli;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | Mingei (822336)

    Digital Libraries (DLs), especially in the Cultural Heritage domain, are rich in narratives. Every digital object in a DL tells some kind of story, regardless of the medium, the genre, or the type of the object. However, DLs do not offer services about narratives, for example it is not possible to discover a narrative, to create one, or to compare two narratives. Certainly, DLs offer discovery functionalities over their contents, but these services merely address the objects that carry the narratives (e.g. books, images, audiovisual objects), without regard for the narratives themselves. The present work aims at introducing narratives as first-class citizens in DLs, by providing a formal expression of what a narrative is. In particular, this paper presents a conceptualisation of the domain of narratives, and its specification through the Narrative Ontology (NOnt for short), expressed in first-order logic. NOnt has been implemented as an extension of three standard vocabularies, i.e. the CIDOC CRM, FRBRoo, and OWL Time, and using the SWRL rule language to express the axioms. On the basis of NOnt, we have developed the Narrative Building and Visualising (NBVT) tool, and applied it in four case studies to validate the ontology. NOnt is also being validated in the context of the Mingei European project, in which it is applied to the representation of knowledge about Craft Heritage. Preprint

  • Publication . Article . 2013
    Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Nicola Ferro; Gianmaria Silvello;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
    Project: EC | PROMISE (258191), EC | CULTURA (269973)

    Abstract Archives are an extremely valuable part of our cultural heritage since they represent the trace of the activities of a physical or juridical person in the course of their business. Despite their importance, the models and technologies that have been developed over the past two decades in the Digital Library (DL) field have not been specifically tailored to archives. This is especially true when it comes to formal and foundational frameworks, as the Streams, Structures, Spaces, Scenarios, Societies (5S) model is. Therefore, we propose an innovative formal model, called NEsted SeTs for Object hieRarchies (NESTOR), for archives, explicitly built around the concepts of context and hierarchy which play a central role in the archival realm. NESTOR is composed of two set-based data models: the Nested Sets Model (NS-M) and the Inverse Nested Sets Model (INS-M) that express the hierarchical relationships between objects through the inclusion property between sets. We formally study the properties of these models and prove their equivalence with the notion of hierarchy entailed by archives. We then use NESTOR to extend the 5S model in order to take into account the specific features of archives and to tailor the notion of digital library accordingly. This offers the possibility of opening up the full wealth of DL methods and technologies to archives. We demonstrate the impact of NESTOR on this problem through three example use cases.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hollander, H.S.; Aloia, Nicola; Binding, Ceri; Cuy, Sebastian; Doerr, Martin; Fanini, Bruno; Felicetti, Achille; Fihn, Johan; Gavrilis, Dimitris; Geser, Guntram; +12 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: Netherlands, France, Italy, Italy, France
    Project: EC | ARIADNE (313193)

    International audience; Research e-infrastructures, digital archives and data services have become important pillars of scientific enterprise that in recent decades has become ever more collaborative, distributed and data-intensive. The archaeological research community has been an early adopter of digital tools for data acquisition, organisation, analysis and presentation of research results of individual projects. However, the provision of e-infrastructure and services for data sharing, discovery, access and re-use has lagged behind. This situation is being addressed by ARIADNE: the Advanced Research Infrastructure for Archaeological Dataset Networking in Europe. This EU-funded network has developed an e-infrastructure that enables data providers to register and provide access to their resources (datasets, collections) through the ARIADNE data portal, facilitating discovery, access and other services across the integrated resources. This article describes the current landscape of data repositories and services for archaeologists in Europe, and the issues that make interoperability between them difficult to realise. The results of the ARIADNE surveys on users' expectations and requirements are also presented. The main section of the article describes the architecture of the e-infrastructure, core services (data registration, discovery and access) and various other extant or experimental services. The on-going evaluation of the data integration and services is also discussed. Finally, the article summarises lessons learned, and outlines the prospects for the wider engagement of the archaeological research community in sharing data through ARIADNE.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Chiara Eva Catalano; Valentina Vassallo; Sorin Hermon; Michela Spagnuolo;
    Publisher: Springer., Heidelberg, Germania
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | GRAVITATE (665155)

    In this paper, we will explore the theme of the documentation of 3D cultural heritage assets, not only as entire artefacts but also including the interesting features of the object from an archaeological perspective. Indeed, the goal is supporting archaeological research and curation, providing a different approach to enrich the documentation of digital resources and their components with corresponding measurements, combining semantic and geometric techniques. A documentation scheme based on CIDOC, where measurements on digital data have been included extending CIDOC CRMdig, is discussed. To annotate accurately the components and features of the artefacts, a controlled vocabulary named Cultural Heritage Artefact Partonomy (CHAP) has been defined and integrated into the scheme as a SKOS taxonomy to showcase the proposed methodology. CHAP concerns Coroplastic, which is the study of ancient terracotta figurines and in particular the Cypriot production. Two case studies have been considered: the terracotta statues from the port of Salamis and the small clay statuettes from the Ayia Irini sanctuary. Focussing both on the artefacts and their digital counterparts, the proposed methodology supports effectively typical operations within digital libraries and repositories (e.g. search, part-based annotation), and more specific objectives such as the archaeological interpretation and digitally assisted classification, as proved in a real archaeological scenario. The proposed approach is general and applies to different contexts, since it is able to support any archaeological research where the goal is an extensive digital documentation of tangible findings including quantitative attributes.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Alberto Barrón-Cedeño; Marta Vila; Maria Antònia Martí; Paolo Rosso;
    Publisher: The MIT Press
    Countries: Spain, Italy
    Project: EC | ABCDE (246016), EC | WIQ-EI (269180)

    [EN] Although paraphrasing is the linguistic mechanism underlying many plagiarism cases, little attention has been paid to its analysis in the framework of automatic plagiarism detection. Therefore, state-of-the-art plagiarism detectors find it difficult to detect cases of paraphrase plagiarism. In this article, we analyze the relationship between paraphrasing and plagiarism, paying special attention to which paraphrase phenomena underlie acts of plagiarism and which of them are detected by plagiarism detection systems. With this aim in mind, we created the P4P corpus, a new resource that uses a paraphrase typology to annotate a subset of the PAN-PC-10 corpus for automatic plagiarism detection. The results of the Second International Competition on Plagiarism Detection were analyzed in the light of this annotation.The presented experiments show that (i) more complex paraphrase phenomena and a high density of paraphrase mechanisms make plagiarism detection more difficult, (ii) lexical substitutions are the paraphrase mechanisms used the most when plagiarizing, and (iii) paraphrase mechanisms tend to shorten the plagiarized text. For the first time, the paraphrase mechanisms behind plagiarism have been analyzed, providing critical insights for the improvement of automatic plagiarism detection systems. We would like to thank the people who participated in the annotation of the P4P corpus, Horacio Rodriguez for his helpful advice as experienced researcher, and the reviewers of this contribution for their valuable comments to improve this article. This research work was partially carried out during the tenure of an ERCIM "Alain Bensoussan" Fellowship Programme. The research leading to these results received funding from the EU FP7 Programme 2007-2013 (grant no. 246016), the MICINN projects TEXT-ENTERPRISE 2.0 and TEXT-KNOWLEDGE 2.0 (TIN2009-13391), the EC WIQ-EI IRSES project (grant no. 269180), and the FP7 Marie Curie People Programme. The research work of A. Barron-Cedeno and M. Vila was financed by the CONACyT-Mexico 192021 grant and the MECD-Spain FPU AP2008-02185 grant, respectively. The research work of A. Barron-Cedeno was partially done in the framework of his Ph.D. at the Universitat Politecnica de Valencia.

  • Publication . Preprint . Other literature type . Article . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rebora, Simone; Boot, Peter; Pianzola, Federico; Gasser, Brigitte; Herrmann, J Berenike; Kraxenberger, Maria; Kuijpers, Moniek M; Lauer, Gerhard; Lendvai, Piroska; Messerli, Thomas C; +1 more
    Countries: Italy, Germany, Netherlands
    Project: EC | READIT (792849), SNSF | Mining Goodreads: a text ... (183194), SNSF | Forschungslogiken in den ... (183221), SNSF | Geteiltes Lesen. Literatu... (183012)

    AbstractProminent among the social developments that the web 2.0 has facilitated is digital social reading (DSR): on many platforms there are functionalities for creating book reviews, ‘inline’ commenting on book texts, online story writing (often in the form of fanfiction), informal book discussions, book vlogs, and more. In this article, we argue that DSR offers unique possibilities for research into literature, reading, the impact of reading and literary communication. We also claim that in this context computational tools are especially relevant, making DSR a field particularly suitable for the application of Digital Humanities methods. We draw up an initial categorization of research aspects of DSR and briefly examine literature for each category. We distinguish between studies on DSR that use it as a lens to study wider processes of literary exchange as opposed to studies for which the DSR culture is a phenomenon interesting in its own right. Via seven examples of DSR research, we discuss the chosen approaches and their connection to research questions in literary studies.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
18 Research products, page 1 of 2
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Valentina Bartalesi; Carlo Meghini; Daniele Metilli;
    Publisher: Inderscience, [Olney] , Regno Unito
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | PARTHENOS (654119)

    Current Digital Libraries (DLs) are mostly built around large collections of scarcely related objects. We aim at enriching the information space of DLs by introducing narratives, consisting of two main components: networks of events related to one another and to the DL resources through semantic links, and narrations of those events in texts. In order to introduce narratives in DLs, we developed a conceptualisation based on narratology and we expressed it using the CIDOC CRM and CRMinf as reference ontologies. We used this expression to validate our conceptualisation, creating a narrative of the biography of Dante Alighieri as a realistic case study. To support this experiment, we developed a semi-automated tool that collects basic knowledge about objects and events from Wikidata. The developed ontology is general enough to be not limited to create biographies but other types of narratives as well.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Partarakis N.; Doulgeraki P.; Karuzaki E.; Adami I.; Ntoa S.; Metilli D.; Bartalesi V.; Meghini C.; Marketakis Y.; Kaplanidi D.; +2 more
    Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | Mingei (822336)

    In this article, the Mingei Online Platform is presented as an authoring platform for the representation of social and historic context encompassing a focal topic of interest. The proposed representation is employed in the contextualised presentation of a given topic, through documented narratives that support its presentation to diverse audiences. Using the obtained representation, the documentation and digital preservation of social and historical dimensions of Cultural Heritage are demonstrated. The implementation follows the Human-Centred Design approach and has been conducted under an iterative design and evaluation approach involving both usability and domain experts.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Arianna Gatta; Francesco Mattioli; Letizia Mencarini; Daniele Vignoli;
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | EU-FER (725961)

    The role of employment uncertainty as a fertility driver has previously been studied with a limited set of constructs, leading to inconclusive results. We address this oversight by considering perceived stability of employment and perceived resilience to potential job loss as two key dimensions of employment uncertainty in relation to fertility decision-making. The present study relies on the 2017 Italian Trustlab survey and its employment uncertainty module. We find that perception of resilience to job loss is a powerful predictor of fertility intentions, whereas perception of employment stability has only a limited impact. The observed relationship between resilience and fertility intentions is robust to the inclusion of person-specific risk attitude and does not depend on the unemployment rate or the share of fixed-term contracts in the area of residence. We conclude that the notion of employment uncertainty includes distinct expectations towards the future, which should be considered separately to understand fertility decision-making.Supplementary material for this article is available at: https://doi.org/10.1080/00324728.2021.1939406.

  • Publication . Article . Preprint . 2018 . Embargo End Date: 01 Jan 2017
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Firoj Alam; Morena Danieli; Giuseppe Riccardi;
    Publisher: arXiv
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | SENSEI (610916)

    Empathy, as defined in behavioral sciences, expresses the ability of human beings to recognize, understand and react to emotions, attitudes and beliefs of others. The lack of an operational definition of empathy makes it difficult to measure it. In this paper, we address two related problems in automatic affective behavior analysis: the design of the annotation protocol and the automatic recognition of empathy from spoken conversations. We propose and evaluate an annotation scheme for empathy inspired by the modal model of emotions. The annotation scheme was evaluated on a corpus of real-life, dyadic spoken conversations. In the context of behavioral analysis, we designed an automatic segmentation and classification system for empathy. Given the different speech and language levels of representation where empathy may be communicated, we investigated features derived from the lexical and acoustic spaces. The feature development process was designed to support both the fusion and automatic selection of relevant features from high dimensional space. The automatic classification system was evaluated on call center conversations where it showed significantly better performance than the baseline. Comment: Journal of Computer Speech and Language

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Carlo Meghini; Valentina Bartalesi; Daniele Metilli;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | Mingei (822336)

    Digital Libraries (DLs), especially in the Cultural Heritage domain, are rich in narratives. Every digital object in a DL tells some kind of story, regardless of the medium, the genre, or the type of the object. However, DLs do not offer services about narratives, for example it is not possible to discover a narrative, to create one, or to compare two narratives. Certainly, DLs offer discovery functionalities over their contents, but these services merely address the objects that carry the narratives (e.g. books, images, audiovisual objects), without regard for the narratives themselves. The present work aims at introducing narratives as first-class citizens in DLs, by providing a formal expression of what a narrative is. In particular, this paper presents a conceptualisation of the domain of narratives, and its specification through the Narrative Ontology (NOnt for short), expressed in first-order logic. NOnt has been implemented as an extension of three standard vocabularies, i.e. the CIDOC CRM, FRBRoo, and OWL Time, and using the SWRL rule language to express the axioms. On the basis of NOnt, we have developed the Narrative Building and Visualising (NBVT) tool, and applied it in four case studies to validate the ontology. NOnt is also being validated in the context of the Mingei European project, in which it is applied to the representation of knowledge about Craft Heritage. Preprint

  • Publication . Article . 2013
    Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Nicola Ferro; Gianmaria Silvello;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
    Project: EC | PROMISE (258191), EC | CULTURA (269973)

    Abstract Archives are an extremely valuable part of our cultural heritage since they represent the trace of the activities of a physical or juridical person in the course of their business. Despite their importance, the models and technologies that have been developed over the past two decades in the Digital Library (DL) field have not been specifically tailored to archives. This is especially true when it comes to formal and foundational frameworks, as the Streams, Structures, Spaces, Scenarios, Societies (5S) model is. Therefore, we propose an innovative formal model, called NEsted SeTs for Object hieRarchies (NESTOR), for archives, explicitly built around the concepts of context and hierarchy which play a central role in the archival realm. NESTOR is composed of two set-based data models: the Nested Sets Model (NS-M) and the Inverse Nested Sets Model (INS-M) that express the hierarchical relationships between objects through the inclusion property between sets. We formally study the properties of these models and prove their equivalence with the notion of hierarchy entailed by archives. We then use NESTOR to extend the 5S model in order to take into account the specific features of archives and to tailor the notion of digital library accordingly. This offers the possibility of opening up the full wealth of DL methods and technologies to archives. We demonstrate the impact of NESTOR on this problem through three example use cases.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hollander, H.S.; Aloia, Nicola; Binding, Ceri; Cuy, Sebastian; Doerr, Martin; Fanini, Bruno; Felicetti, Achille; Fihn, Johan; Gavrilis, Dimitris; Geser, Guntram; +12 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: Netherlands, France, Italy, Italy, France
    Project: EC | ARIADNE (313193)

    International audience; Research e-infrastructures, digital archives and data services have become important pillars of scientific enterprise that in recent decades has become ever more collaborative, distributed and data-intensive. The archaeological research community has been an early adopter of digital tools for data acquisition, organisation, analysis and presentation of research results of individual projects. However, the provision of e-infrastructure and services for data sharing, discovery, access and re-use has lagged behind. This situation is being addressed by ARIADNE: the Advanced Research Infrastructure for Archaeological Dataset Networking in Europe. This EU-funded network has developed an e-infrastructure that enables data providers to register and provide access to their resources (datasets, collections) through the ARIADNE data portal, facilitating discovery, access and other services across the integrated resources. This article describes the current landscape of data repositories and services for archaeologists in Europe, and the issues that make interoperability between them difficult to realise. The results of the ARIADNE surveys on users' expectations and requirements are also presented. The main section of the article describes the architecture of the e-infrastructure, core services (data registration, discovery and access) and various other extant or experimental services. The on-going evaluation of the data integration and services is also discussed. Finally, the article summarises lessons learned, and outlines the prospects for the wider engagement of the archaeological research community in sharing data through ARIADNE.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Chiara Eva Catalano; Valentina Vassallo; Sorin Hermon; Michela Spagnuolo;
    Publisher: Springer., Heidelberg, Germania
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | GRAVITATE (665155)

    In this paper, we will explore the theme of the documentation of 3D cultural heritage assets, not only as entire artefacts but also including the interesting features of the object from an archaeological perspective. Indeed, the goal is supporting archaeological research and curation, providing a different approach to enrich the documentation of digital resources and their components with corresponding measurements, combining semantic and geometric techniques. A documentation scheme based on CIDOC, where measurements on digital data have been included extending CIDOC CRMdig, is discussed. To annotate accurately the components and features of the artefacts, a controlled vocabulary named Cultural Heritage Artefact Partonomy (CHAP) has been defined and integrated into the scheme as a SKOS taxonomy to showcase the proposed methodology. CHAP concerns Coroplastic, which is the study of ancient terracotta figurines and in particular the Cypriot production. Two case studies have been considered: the terracotta statues from the port of Salamis and the small clay statuettes from the Ayia Irini sanctuary. Focussing both on the artefacts and their digital counterparts, the proposed methodology supports effectively typical operations within digital libraries and repositories (e.g. search, part-based annotation), and more specific objectives such as the archaeological interpretation and digitally assisted classification, as proved in a real archaeological scenario. The proposed approach is general and applies to different contexts, since it is able to support any archaeological research where the goal is an extensive digital documentation of tangible findings including quantitative attributes.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Alberto Barrón-Cedeño; Marta Vila; Maria Antònia Martí; Paolo Rosso;
    Publisher: The MIT Press
    Countries: Spain, Italy
    Project: EC | ABCDE (246016), EC | WIQ-EI (269180)

    [EN] Although paraphrasing is the linguistic mechanism underlying many plagiarism cases, little attention has been paid to its analysis in the framework of automatic plagiarism detection. Therefore, state-of-the-art plagiarism detectors find it difficult to detect cases of paraphrase plagiarism. In this article, we analyze the relationship between paraphrasing and plagiarism, paying special attention to which paraphrase phenomena underlie acts of plagiarism and which of them are detected by plagiarism detection systems. With this aim in mind, we created the P4P corpus, a new resource that uses a paraphrase typology to annotate a subset of the PAN-PC-10 corpus for automatic plagiarism detection. The results of the Second International Competition on Plagiarism Detection were analyzed in the light of this annotation.The presented experiments show that (i) more complex paraphrase phenomena and a high density of paraphrase mechanisms make plagiarism detection more difficult, (ii) lexical substitutions are the paraphrase mechanisms used the most when plagiarizing, and (iii) paraphrase mechanisms tend to shorten the plagiarized text. For the first time, the paraphrase mechanisms behind plagiarism have been analyzed, providing critical insights for the improvement of automatic plagiarism detection systems. We would like to thank the people who participated in the annotation of the P4P corpus, Horacio Rodriguez for his helpful advice as experienced researcher, and the reviewers of this contribution for their valuable comments to improve this article. This research work was partially carried out during the tenure of an ERCIM "Alain Bensoussan" Fellowship Programme. The research leading to these results received funding from the EU FP7 Programme 2007-2013 (grant no. 246016), the MICINN projects TEXT-ENTERPRISE 2.0 and TEXT-KNOWLEDGE 2.0 (TIN2009-13391), the EC WIQ-EI IRSES project (grant no. 269180), and the FP7 Marie Curie People Programme. The research work of A. Barron-Cedeno and M. Vila was financed by the CONACyT-Mexico 192021 grant and the MECD-Spain FPU AP2008-02185 grant, respectively. The research work of A. Barron-Cedeno was partially done in the framework of his Ph.D. at the Universitat Politecnica de Valencia.

  • Publication . Preprint . Other literature type . Article . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rebora, Simone; Boot, Peter; Pianzola, Federico; Gasser, Brigitte; Herrmann, J Berenike; Kraxenberger, Maria; Kuijpers, Moniek M; Lauer, Gerhard; Lendvai, Piroska; Messerli, Thomas C; +1 more
    Countries: Italy, Germany, Netherlands
    Project: EC | READIT (792849), SNSF | Mining Goodreads: a text ... (183194), SNSF | Forschungslogiken in den ... (183221), SNSF | Geteiltes Lesen. Literatu... (183012)

    AbstractProminent among the social developments that the web 2.0 has facilitated is digital social reading (DSR): on many platforms there are functionalities for creating book reviews, ‘inline’ commenting on book texts, online story writing (often in the form of fanfiction), informal book discussions, book vlogs, and more. In this article, we argue that DSR offers unique possibilities for research into literature, reading, the impact of reading and literary communication. We also claim that in this context computational tools are especially relevant, making DSR a field particularly suitable for the application of Digital Humanities methods. We draw up an initial categorization of research aspects of DSR and briefly examine literature for each category. We distinguish between studies on DSR that use it as a lens to study wider processes of literary exchange as opposed to studies for which the DSR culture is a phenomenon interesting in its own right. Via seven examples of DSR research, we discuss the chosen approaches and their connection to research questions in literary studies.