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23 Research products, page 1 of 3

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  • Open Access Estonian
    Authors: 
    Ingrid Rüütel;
    Publisher: Eesti Kirjandusmuuseum

    Kihnu is a small island off the western coast of Estonia, where a number of traditional cultural phenomena have been preserved. Quite a number of traditional dances are kept alive in the traditional and modern context. These dances are danced at traditional family and calendar events: pre-wedding rituals and weddings, gatherings on the eve of St Catherine’s Day, as social dances at different festivities, during organized performances for tourists, and at festivals and other events on the Kihnu island as well as in Estonian towns and abroad. The dancers are mainly members of the amateur group Kihnumua, which has been active for more than 30 years under the guidance of Katrin Kumpan. The groups have no fixed membership, as most of the island’s inhabitants know the tradition. Dances were taught also in the local school and dance club. Some old round and partner dances have disappeared, but about 10–15 dances, mostly partner dances, are still in active use. All partner dances (incl. waltz and polka) are danced in a circle. Couples can be mixed, though women often dance among themselves. Many widely known dances have specific regional style variants. The main musical instrument nowadays is accordion, which is often played by women. Bagpipe music is forgotten, and good fiddlers were found up to the mid-20th century. Also, hand harmonica, the most popular musical instrument of the late 19th and early 20th century, has become rather rare by now.

  • Open Access Estonian
    Authors: 
    Kaarina Rein;
    Publisher: Eesti Kirjandusmuuseum

    The present article deals mainly with the works of Johannes Raicus, the scientist in the field of medicine from the 17th century, focusing on his treatise Disputatio physicomedica votiva e„j ƒšrwa surgenti jam Dorpati novo collegio region, debated at the Gymnasiumof Tartu by Petrus Turdinus, the future student of theology at the University of Tartu.When comparing this disputation with the rest of the works by both Johannes Raicus and Petrus Turdinus – physician and theologian respectively – it becomes clear that the author of the given treatise is indeed Johannes Raicus. Disputatio physicomedica votiva ... reveals an original approach to the subject matter, i.e. the city of Tartu,being clearly distinct from the medical works written in Academia Gustaviana, the Swedish University of Tartu, especially in the respect of developing the ideas of Paracelsus and his followers. Thus it can be concluded that Disputatio physico-medica votiva ...by Johannes Raicus is a peculiar phenomenon amongst the 17th century scientific works in Tartu.

  • Publication . Article . 2020
    Open Access Estonian
    Authors: 
    Tolonen, Mikko; Mäkelä, Eetu; Marjanen, Jani; Tahko, Tuuli;
    Country: Finland

    Peer reviewed

  • Open Access Estonian
    Authors: 
    Raimonda Nabazaite;
    Country: Lithuania

    The article presents the late medieval vessel stove tiles of Klaipėda, which are located on the Baltic Sea shore of the current territory of Lithuania. This article analyses the technological and morphological qualities of vessel tiles. The author attempts to characterize and compare the types of tiles according to the materials used from three areas of Klaipėda: 1) the territory of the castle and the medieval town; 2) the town dump; 3) the relocated town in the early modern period. Furthermore, the article attempts to update both the topographical changes of the town and the historical context which may have influenced the renewal of daily household items, including tile stoves in the houses of the townspeople.

  • Open Access Estonian
    Authors: 
    Lauri Liiders;
    Publisher: Eesti Kirjandusmuuseum

    This paper provides an overview of the first detailed case study of a Buddhist congregation in Estonia. The object of this study is Triratna Buddhist Community in Estonia, which was established here in 1989 and is part of international Triratna Buddhist Community (formerly known as Friends of the Western Buddhist Order) created in the United Kingdom in 1967. Mainly through oral history and participant observation methods as well as analysis of data presented by different written and oral sources the researcher strives to give an overview of various aspects of activity connected with one particular Buddhist group in Estonia, including its practice, ordination rituals, beliefs and membership characteristics. It also includes a detailed overview of the congregation’s history and its relationship with members of Triratna congregations in Finland and the UK. It presents Buddhism as an emerging new religion in Estonia through a case study of a Western Buddhist ecumenical congregation.

  • Publication . Article . 1997
    Open Access Estonian
    Authors: 
    Erik Tago;
    Publisher: Eesti Kirjandusmuuseum

    Earlier superstitious views of comets have changed more rational in recent centuries. A short review of comets which have been outstanding from historical and astronomical point of view has presented.

  • Open Access Estonian
    Authors: 
    Tõnno Jonuks;
    Publisher: Eesti Kirjandusmuuseum

    The article takes a critical look at archaeoastronomy as a marginalised area of research and dwells upon the so-called “bad examples” with an aim to highlight the methodological reasons why archaeoastronomy is not considered a true science. The elicited examples are indeed made by amateurs, yet with an academic research background, and published in academic format. Thus, these treatments can potentially find their way into the knowledge of common people and shape their worldview. Until now, critical reviews of the elevant treatments have been non-existent, and the following article attempts to analyse the problematic issues in archaeoastronomy related treatments and bring out certain generalisations as to why such strange conclusions have been reached.

  • Publication . Article . 2007
    Open Access Estonian
    Authors: 
    Jinseok Seo;
    Publisher: Eesti Kirjandusmuuseum

    The article discusses the structure of Korean legends as representative of female heroism, the purpose of which was to instil courage and hope in women at the time, and thereby proves that Korean legends are not merely a passive reflection of the social situation but serve an active function of influencing the society in a particular way and arranging the illogical social organisation. In addition, the article studies the heroism of Korean women in legends glorifying their beauty and dignity. In Korean legends, women are mostly perceived as passive mediators whose function is to give birth to heroes. But there are also other legends, which have been passed on throughout the long history, the nature and structure of which is analogous to European legends. Perhaps there have been other such legends, but they have not been preserved owing to the fact that the Korean society has been long dominated by men or nobility. The myths and legends are not merely simple representations of Korean society at the time, but serve as antisocial messages by shamans of the lowest social stratum, who lived under double pressure. Their message was that all people are born equal and share equal human rights, and they ridiculed the hypocrisy of the nobility, who harshly criticised shamans but eventually followed their advice.

  • Open Access Estonian
    Authors: 
    Gad Yair;
    Publisher: European Association for American Studies

    Hofstadter's classic essay "The Paranoid Style in American Politics" opened a floodgate of analyses of fear and conspiracy theories in American culture. The present paper adds to those studies by providing a cultural interpretation of commercials for alternative cures. It shows that publishers of such commercials often use a "conspiracist strategy" in two interrelated steps. They first raise fears of government collusion with 'Big Pharma.' They then call citizens-cum-patients to protect their liberties from hidden machinations by buying 'hidden' or 'censured' cures. While doing so they employ a series of means to seem professional yet persecuted; scientific though in clandestine. Their graphics and apocalyptic narratives necessitate patients to take swift actions. By manipulating fears and conspiratorial suspicions, entrepreneurs promise suffering 'patriots' that by choosing their alternative cures they would win back their liberty and health. The paper discusses the general theoretical implications for studying conspiracy theories while calling for a comparative approach for observing local habitual predispositions on the one hand, and the culturally adapted conspiracist strategies for manipulating them, on the other hand. In contemporary America, for example, politicians and media outlets employ conspiracist strategies to raise fears from the 'deep state.' They succeed doing so because those conspiracist strategies and the suspicious habitus they manipulate spring from the same democratic source.

  • Open Access Estonian
    Authors: 
    Tiiu Jaago;
    Publisher: Eesti Kirjandusmuuseum

    In Estonia narrative history [pärimuslik ajalugu] as a field of study and research trend is internationally associated with concepts and trends known by keywords `oral history' and `ethnohistory'. Oral history deals mostly with popular interpretations of the near history and has sprung out of historical studies following the World War II. Ethnohistory is a folkloric approach to interpretations of the past, where the focus of study is narratives of earlier cultures in the recent past or of the ancient cultures. The article observes two written narrative threads from the recent past. The stories, one written in 1961 and the other one in 2001, describe the formation of an industrial region in Estonia in the 20th century. The turning point of the narrative is World War II and the change of ruling regime in 1941 and 1944 in Estonia. The first story was sent to the Estonian National Museum by a correspondent, while the other was sent in response to the collection of life stories and is preserved in the Cultural History Archives of the Estonian Literary Museum. Both stories are true experience narratives and include an evaluation in the context of narrative period. The main problem tackled in the article is the treatment of time and its manifestations in the analysed stories: how the authors have distributed the narrative events chronologically; how different periods (the time of events, time of narration) have affected the formation of narrative chronology; which factors affecting the interpretations and perceptions of the period become evident in the narratives. The texts are analysed on super, macro and micro level, whereas the main emphasis is on macro-structure (chronological markers, comments and transitions to new markers). The central conflict in both narratives lies in the topics related to the mores, ethics and things considered sacred, in the second narrative the issue of power is added. Comparison of the two narratives reveals that the time lapse has distanced the narrator from the event, but has added the experience from the years between, i.e. the aftermath of the events and narratives about them. The intensification of political colouring in the second narrative (written in 2001) is inspired by the 50 years of living in the Soviet Union, during the period between the events and the narrative act (1944-1991; including the period of Russianisation, political censure, etc.). The experiences have begun to shape the interpretations of the events as source facts and therefore the distance has introduced both the course of events as well as the narrative of thought to the narrative history.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
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arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
23 Research products, page 1 of 3
  • Open Access Estonian
    Authors: 
    Ingrid Rüütel;
    Publisher: Eesti Kirjandusmuuseum

    Kihnu is a small island off the western coast of Estonia, where a number of traditional cultural phenomena have been preserved. Quite a number of traditional dances are kept alive in the traditional and modern context. These dances are danced at traditional family and calendar events: pre-wedding rituals and weddings, gatherings on the eve of St Catherine’s Day, as social dances at different festivities, during organized performances for tourists, and at festivals and other events on the Kihnu island as well as in Estonian towns and abroad. The dancers are mainly members of the amateur group Kihnumua, which has been active for more than 30 years under the guidance of Katrin Kumpan. The groups have no fixed membership, as most of the island’s inhabitants know the tradition. Dances were taught also in the local school and dance club. Some old round and partner dances have disappeared, but about 10–15 dances, mostly partner dances, are still in active use. All partner dances (incl. waltz and polka) are danced in a circle. Couples can be mixed, though women often dance among themselves. Many widely known dances have specific regional style variants. The main musical instrument nowadays is accordion, which is often played by women. Bagpipe music is forgotten, and good fiddlers were found up to the mid-20th century. Also, hand harmonica, the most popular musical instrument of the late 19th and early 20th century, has become rather rare by now.

  • Open Access Estonian
    Authors: 
    Kaarina Rein;
    Publisher: Eesti Kirjandusmuuseum

    The present article deals mainly with the works of Johannes Raicus, the scientist in the field of medicine from the 17th century, focusing on his treatise Disputatio physicomedica votiva e„j ƒšrwa surgenti jam Dorpati novo collegio region, debated at the Gymnasiumof Tartu by Petrus Turdinus, the future student of theology at the University of Tartu.When comparing this disputation with the rest of the works by both Johannes Raicus and Petrus Turdinus – physician and theologian respectively – it becomes clear that the author of the given treatise is indeed Johannes Raicus. Disputatio physicomedica votiva ... reveals an original approach to the subject matter, i.e. the city of Tartu,being clearly distinct from the medical works written in Academia Gustaviana, the Swedish University of Tartu, especially in the respect of developing the ideas of Paracelsus and his followers. Thus it can be concluded that Disputatio physico-medica votiva ...by Johannes Raicus is a peculiar phenomenon amongst the 17th century scientific works in Tartu.

  • Publication . Article . 2020
    Open Access Estonian
    Authors: 
    Tolonen, Mikko; Mäkelä, Eetu; Marjanen, Jani; Tahko, Tuuli;
    Country: Finland

    Peer reviewed

  • Open Access Estonian
    Authors: 
    Raimonda Nabazaite;
    Country: Lithuania

    The article presents the late medieval vessel stove tiles of Klaipėda, which are located on the Baltic Sea shore of the current territory of Lithuania. This article analyses the technological and morphological qualities of vessel tiles. The author attempts to characterize and compare the types of tiles according to the materials used from three areas of Klaipėda: 1) the territory of the castle and the medieval town; 2) the town dump; 3) the relocated town in the early modern period. Furthermore, the article attempts to update both the topographical changes of the town and the historical context which may have influenced the renewal of daily household items, including tile stoves in the houses of the townspeople.

  • Open Access Estonian
    Authors: 
    Lauri Liiders;
    Publisher: Eesti Kirjandusmuuseum

    This paper provides an overview of the first detailed case study of a Buddhist congregation in Estonia. The object of this study is Triratna Buddhist Community in Estonia, which was established here in 1989 and is part of international Triratna Buddhist Community (formerly known as Friends of the Western Buddhist Order) created in the United Kingdom in 1967. Mainly through oral history and participant observation methods as well as analysis of data presented by different written and oral sources the researcher strives to give an overview of various aspects of activity connected with one particular Buddhist group in Estonia, including its practice, ordination rituals, beliefs and membership characteristics. It also includes a detailed overview of the congregation’s history and its relationship with members of Triratna congregations in Finland and the UK. It presents Buddhism as an emerging new religion in Estonia through a case study of a Western Buddhist ecumenical congregation.

  • Publication . Article . 1997
    Open Access Estonian
    Authors: 
    Erik Tago;
    Publisher: Eesti Kirjandusmuuseum

    Earlier superstitious views of comets have changed more rational in recent centuries. A short review of comets which have been outstanding from historical and astronomical point of view has presented.

  • Open Access Estonian
    Authors: 
    Tõnno Jonuks;
    Publisher: Eesti Kirjandusmuuseum

    The article takes a critical look at archaeoastronomy as a marginalised area of research and dwells upon the so-called “bad examples” with an aim to highlight the methodological reasons why archaeoastronomy is not considered a true science. The elicited examples are indeed made by amateurs, yet with an academic research background, and published in academic format. Thus, these treatments can potentially find their way into the knowledge of common people and shape their worldview. Until now, critical reviews of the elevant treatments have been non-existent, and the following article attempts to analyse the problematic issues in archaeoastronomy related treatments and bring out certain generalisations as to why such strange conclusions have been reached.

  • Publication . Article . 2007
    Open Access Estonian
    Authors: 
    Jinseok Seo;
    Publisher: Eesti Kirjandusmuuseum

    The article discusses the structure of Korean legends as representative of female heroism, the purpose of which was to instil courage and hope in women at the time, and thereby proves that Korean legends are not merely a passive reflection of the social situation but serve an active function of influencing the society in a particular way and arranging the illogical social organisation. In addition, the article studies the heroism of Korean women in legends glorifying their beauty and dignity. In Korean legends, women are mostly perceived as passive mediators whose function is to give birth to heroes. But there are also other legends, which have been passed on throughout the long history, the nature and structure of which is analogous to European legends. Perhaps there have been other such legends, but they have not been preserved owing to the fact that the Korean society has been long dominated by men or nobility. The myths and legends are not merely simple representations of Korean society at the time, but serve as antisocial messages by shamans of the lowest social stratum, who lived under double pressure. Their message was that all people are born equal and share equal human rights, and they ridiculed the hypocrisy of the nobility, who harshly criticised shamans but eventually followed their advice.

  • Open Access Estonian
    Authors: 
    Gad Yair;
    Publisher: European Association for American Studies

    Hofstadter's classic essay "The Paranoid Style in American Politics" opened a floodgate of analyses of fear and conspiracy theories in American culture. The present paper adds to those studies by providing a cultural interpretation of commercials for alternative cures. It shows that publishers of such commercials often use a "conspiracist strategy" in two interrelated steps. They first raise fears of government collusion with 'Big Pharma.' They then call citizens-cum-patients to protect their liberties from hidden machinations by buying 'hidden' or 'censured' cures. While doing so they employ a series of means to seem professional yet persecuted; scientific though in clandestine. Their graphics and apocalyptic narratives necessitate patients to take swift actions. By manipulating fears and conspiratorial suspicions, entrepreneurs promise suffering 'patriots' that by choosing their alternative cures they would win back their liberty and health. The paper discusses the general theoretical implications for studying conspiracy theories while calling for a comparative approach for observing local habitual predispositions on the one hand, and the culturally adapted conspiracist strategies for manipulating them, on the other hand. In contemporary America, for example, politicians and media outlets employ conspiracist strategies to raise fears from the 'deep state.' They succeed doing so because those conspiracist strategies and the suspicious habitus they manipulate spring from the same democratic source.

  • Open Access Estonian
    Authors: 
    Tiiu Jaago;
    Publisher: Eesti Kirjandusmuuseum

    In Estonia narrative history [pärimuslik ajalugu] as a field of study and research trend is internationally associated with concepts and trends known by keywords `oral history' and `ethnohistory'. Oral history deals mostly with popular interpretations of the near history and has sprung out of historical studies following the World War II. Ethnohistory is a folkloric approach to interpretations of the past, where the focus of study is narratives of earlier cultures in the recent past or of the ancient cultures. The article observes two written narrative threads from the recent past. The stories, one written in 1961 and the other one in 2001, describe the formation of an industrial region in Estonia in the 20th century. The turning point of the narrative is World War II and the change of ruling regime in 1941 and 1944 in Estonia. The first story was sent to the Estonian National Museum by a correspondent, while the other was sent in response to the collection of life stories and is preserved in the Cultural History Archives of the Estonian Literary Museum. Both stories are true experience narratives and include an evaluation in the context of narrative period. The main problem tackled in the article is the treatment of time and its manifestations in the analysed stories: how the authors have distributed the narrative events chronologically; how different periods (the time of events, time of narration) have affected the formation of narrative chronology; which factors affecting the interpretations and perceptions of the period become evident in the narratives. The texts are analysed on super, macro and micro level, whereas the main emphasis is on macro-structure (chronological markers, comments and transitions to new markers). The central conflict in both narratives lies in the topics related to the mores, ethics and things considered sacred, in the second narrative the issue of power is added. Comparison of the two narratives reveals that the time lapse has distanced the narrator from the event, but has added the experience from the years between, i.e. the aftermath of the events and narratives about them. The intensification of political colouring in the second narrative (written in 2001) is inspired by the 50 years of living in the Soviet Union, during the period between the events and the narrative act (1944-1991; including the period of Russianisation, political censure, etc.). The experiences have begun to shape the interpretations of the events as source facts and therefore the distance has introduced both the course of events as well as the narrative of thought to the narrative history.