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39 Research products, page 1 of 4

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
  • Publications
  • Other research products
  • Roskilde Universitetscenter's Digitale Arkiv

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Castells Puig, Gala; Klæbel, Birgitte; Šulskus, Mantautas; Hjorth, Liza;
    Country: Denmark

    Through this paper, we examine the redesign process that the building of Nikolaj Church has gone through from the 1960ies, to how it appears today, as Nikolaj Kunsthal. The traces and layers have visible signs of a random design process through time. Nowadays the art centre aims for a coherent atmosphere and sense of place in an upcoming design process. Our analysis of textual data gathered from relevant documents and interviews with key stakeholders, relies on the development of a sociotechnical perspective. This perspective allows us to recognise the various agencies and networks in connection to the design process that emerge from the technical and social aspects, which are analysed. The findings emphasize the building as an actant and a network, that plays a crucial part in the design process.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jørgensen, Oliver Lunding; Tækker, Tobias Lund; Paget, Marc David; Utzon, Bjørn Anton;
    Publisher: Roskilde University
    Country: Denmark

    This paper, seeks to examine the correlation between stock price and public sentiment expressed through social media. Through twitter scraping and pre- processing, sentiment can be extracted from text. The paper will be based on a heuristic approach to natural language processing. Furthermore, the paper will rely on the most common forms of sentiment analysis, using a rule-based and a machine-learning approach as a starting point and weigh these up against each other. Finally, we will continue with the best performing method, and weigh this up against real market data in a pursuit to find a correlation, should one exist. The paper found a sentiment-to-market accuracy 75%. And the accuracy score utilizing the rules-based approach of 72,72%.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Junker, Ele;
    Country: Denmark

    The French historian and philosopher Michel Foucault, inspired by Nietzsche, has questioned the unity of the notion of truth by meditating upon the relationship between language and reality. Foucault has formulated the methods of archaeology and genealogy in order to show how any claim of truth has its rooting in the interpretation of reality according to specific episteme. Contrary to Foucault’s reflections, the understanding of truth as being ‘out there’ and obtainable by appropriate, i.e. scientific methods, is the bearing element within the development discourse. This tendency is exemplified by the increase in the number of truth commissions worldwide. This thesis focuses on the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) and its Final Report. The TRC’s discourse and methods are analysed in terms of archaeology and genealogy by taking outset in the Report. The analyses are carried out with the aim of putting Foucault’s tools into practice and offering another narrative of the Report, which describes how the objects, main concepts etc. of the TRC have emerged, as well as how these regimes of truth have been put into practice by various techniques, thus constituting the regimes of practice. The overall narrative that appears is that the TRC’s concepts and methods arose as the result of a complicated system of relations and rules that render these concepts arbitrary. Further, the effects of its practices constitute the TRC as a technique of power that aims at disciplining its subjects according to the new moral code, based on human rights, so that the new power relations in South Africa (SA) could be legitimised and maintained. The overall aim of the analyses is to put Foucault’s approaches into perspective and illustrate their strengths and weaknesses. To support this pursuit, various authors are brought in who discuss archaeology and genealogy from different angles. The topics discussed in relation to archaeology are: Problems related to Foucault’s definition of discourse, the relationship between discourse and the social level, the dispersion of the subject, and archaeology as an elitist approach. The issues discussed in relation to genealogy can be summed up as: Foucault’s normativity, the subject, power as strategy, and resistance. The final discussion, i.e. problematisation of Foucault’s regimes of truth and regimes of practices, takes outset in these topics combined with the author’s personal experiences regarding the use of Foucault’s methods and is combined with personal reflections on the consequences of the Foucaultian point of view.

  • Other research product . 2009
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Mohr, Michael; Abildtoft, Mikkel Kramme; Lundkvist, Silas; Jensen, Mark B.; Munck-Westh, Hans; Christiansen, Mark P.;
    Country: Denmark

    This project concerns itself with the controversial 12th century saint and abbot, Bernard of Clairvaux, so influential that his contemporaneity has been called ‘The Age of Bernard’. The project bases its method on Gadamer in an attempt to locate the man behind the legend. Working towards this, primary sources have been read, analyzed and contextualized with secondary sources in order to shed light on Bernard as he conducted himself and was seen by his contemporaries. The project concludes that while passing definite judgment on Bernard is impossible due to the limited availability of primary sources, it is possible to produce meaningful theories and interpretations of his letters, miracles and actions as both an abbot and a politician – he truly was a ‘difficult saint’.

  • Other research product . 2013
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dahler-Larsen, Toke; Bøgelund, Ulrik André;
    Country: Denmark

    In this project, we discuss the phenomenon of UAV warfare. By conducting a discourse analysis of two speeches, one conducted by then counterterrorism advisor John Brennan and one by President Barack Obama, we investigate how UAV use is justified. We briefly discuss the historical background and contemporary public opinion in order to contextualize the discourse presented in the two speeches. The discourse analysis is structured in three analytical categories: how are representations of identity are articulated, how the speakers make claims about the future and finally the specific nature of the justifications of UAV use. Finally, we discuss how our empirical findings relate to the discussion of the changing nature of warfare, as well as we present a brief critique of a position in the current UAV debate. Our main argument in this discussion is that UAVs should be discussed within the social, discursive practice they are used, and not regarded merely as technological objects distinct from the context they exist in.

  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Jepsen, Louise Nygård;
    Country: Denmark

    This project aims to examine the historical source that mappa mundi is. The project is based on a literature study of primarily four carefully chosen writers. The writers are respectively historian of cartography David Woodward, Professor of Renaissance Jerry Brotton, Professor of History Evelyn Edson and Art Historian Naomi Reed Kline. The project is based on a variety of topics through which the use of the Hereford map as a historian source is highlighted and discussed. The premise of the study is a critical position in relation to the conclusions drawn by the chosen authors. The intention is to challenge the inferences made to reality. The conclusion of this report is that interpretations are based on the respective methods and their various viewpoints.

  • Publication . Master thesis . 2006
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gilani, Syed Irfan Munawar;
    Country: Denmark

    Zakat is the third pillar in the five basic tenets of Islam. It is where worship converges with socio-economic affairs of society in the Islamic paradigm. An Islamic obligation, the Prophet Muhammad implemented Zakat in a broad framework, which included the fiscal support of the poor and needy, enabling them to enhance their livelihoods and thereby eradicating poverty. As modern Muslim states, such as Pakistan, are increasingly relating issues of their heritage and faith to questions of self-identification and development, this study explores the concept of Zakat and discerns the role of the state in the early Islamic period in the pursuit of grasping the essence of the context in which the institution was originally established, to thereby conduct an appraisal of the system of Zakat in Pakistan. The identity of Pakistan comes into sharp focus, as the normativeness of Zakat requires an understanding as to the relevance of the Islamic faith to public policies of country.

  • Other research product . 2011
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bitsch, Rasmus Nielsn;
    Country: Denmark

    Summary The Future About the Past is an examination and discussion of non-traditional ways of engaging with a difficult past. In this case the past in question is South Africa’s and its difficult memories of racism. Specifically it is an analysis of the 2009 science-fiction film District 9, directed by the South African Neill Blomkamp. In the project the idea of depicting history on film is discussed, especially inspired by the thoughts of the historian Robert A. Rosenstone. He argues that film can be depictions of the past – and therefore history in its own right and should not be judged on the same scale as written history. From that starting point, I go on to discuss historiography in a South African context and include thoughts on depictions of South Africa on film and cinematographic examples as such. I attempt to analyse District 9 from a historical point of view, especially focusing on what role the film can play in engaging with a difficult past and what it may say about the white, Afrikaans speaking minority’s view of their past. I conclude that the film has its merits as a way of depicting history, but has an underlying problematic view of history that includes racist stereotypification. The analysis leads to a discussion of the possibility of using film when engaging with a painful past. In this case I use examples from the discussion of depictions of Holocaust and argue that alternative films, for example science fiction, have the possibility of engaging with a difficult past in a better way than mainstream cinema and possibly written history.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nielsen, Caspar Le Fevre;
    Country: Denmark

    The goal of this thesis is to analyze in what way the Little Ice Age, a colder climatic period between around 1300-1850, affected the development of the modern Danish state. This is though too large a scope for a single thesis and the wars between 1550-1750 have been chosen as an area of focus. These wars changed the geopolitical position of Denmark in the Nordic area, from a strong nation to a minor player. The worst outcome came, as Denmark lost all processions east of the Sound Strait to its rival Sweden in 1658, of which Bornholm was the only land area to return. These wars correlate to the Maunder Minimum, a period from 1645-1715, which was the coldest part of the Little Ice Age. In order to understand if there is a causation following this correlation, the main focus of the thesis will be the structural integrity of the Danish economy in pre-war and wartime periods. Two different economic spheres will be analyzed, the first being the Sound Toll income and the second the agricultural output. The Sound Toll do not seem to have a strong correlation to the cooling climate, and it does not seem that the colder winters decreased the income from the Toll. However, the agricultural output does seem to have a moderate correlation to the harsher winters of the Maunder Minimum, with a lower total output, thereby decreasing the ability of the State to increase taxation during wartime. It is also possible that the harsher winters increased the susceptibility of the society to epidemics. This master’s thesis argues that there is a possible connection between the changing climate and warfare, especially in the period before 1660. After the change in government, from an aristocratic monarchy to an absolutist monarchy in 1660, the following wars were more manageable for the State, possibly due to better harvests.

  • Other research product . 2016
    Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Petersen, Katherina; Thomsen, Anna; Lindhardtsen, Jesper; Frøkjær-Rubbås, Malthe;
    Country: Denmark

    The subject of this research project is to perform a comparative analysis of a section of the Danish media coverage in three different newspapers of the Israel/Palestine conflict, aiming to highlight an evolution or change, in the discourses used in these papers. The comparative analysis is based upon empirical material of eighteen newspaper editorials, discussing three chosen historical events, during the Israel/Palestine conflict. The historical events which the articles will represent, are the six-day war, the first intifada, and the second intifada. The reasoning behind the selection of these historical events is a necessity, for a broad perspective of the conflict, to make discursive changes more apparent. Additionally the chosen events are all substantial and well documented, and it is through these events that the change of discourse will be presented. To answer the research question thoroughly, a combination of the two distinctive theories relating the study of discourse will be used. The theories are Norman Fairclough’s ‘Critical discourse analysis’ and the ‘Discourse theory’ of Ernesto Laclau and Chantal Mouffe. Both offer an extensive look into the dynamic and complex structures of discourses, and will together provide a set of nuanced methods to complete the analysis. The overall scientific field in which these theories exist, is within the area of social constructivism which also relates to the theory of power by Michael Foucault. The analysis of the various discursive structures of the historical period in question, will focus on describing the more specific types of discourse of the different media outlets, separately and in unison, by shifting incorporations of the theories that have been presented. The precise method for this analytical procedure will be to locate and underline how certain phrases and specific usages of language are in a dynamic relationship with what they aim to represent, and how discourses in general seem to undergo striking, even insidious transformations through their use. Finally, the analysis of this paper attempts to answer the more difficult question, relating the causes behind these discursive transformations, and attributes them to the acknowledgement of discourses in general, as fundamentally transformative properties, where the use of language by its conception, is inevitably changing and dynamic in nature.