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358 Research products, page 1 of 36

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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Irina Paert; James M. White;
    Publisher: Informa UK Limited
    Country: Russian Federation

    The study of the Orthodox diocese 1 in the Russian Empire has a long and storied tradition. Imbued with significant practical advantages (the ability to identify and select a relatively manageable ...

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Olga Shumilo; Tanel Kerikmäe; Archil Chochia;
    Publisher: Sciendo

    AbstractIn this paper, the authors analyse the ambiguous political decision to ban the major Russian web resources from access to the Ukrainian market, in spite of heavy criticisms from local and foreign experts. While the supporters of the new internet policy claimed the new strategy to be coherent with cybersecurity priorities of the country, the opponents pointed out a set of legal and political limitations. Drawing on the setting and results of taking a new approach to information policy, we describe the fragility of Euromaidan democratic heritage and drawbacks of the current political regime. The logical method of legal interpretation has been applied to analyse the controversies of the current legislation on Russian internet resources restriction. The article concludes that Ukrainian post-Euromaidan governance model needs to consolidate the efforts in order to prove the commitment to freedom of speech as a core European value and replace spontaneous actions with an evidence-based approach to political decision-making.

  • Publication . Article . 2020
    Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Francesco Orsi;
    Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

    In Treatise 2.3.4.5 Hume provides an explanation of why ‘we naturally desire what is forbid, and take a pleasure in performing actions, merely because they are unlawful’. Hume's explanation of this phenomenon has barely received any attention so far. But a detailed analysis bears fruit for both Humean scholarship and contemporary moral psychology. After putting the passage in its context, I explain why desiring and taking pleasure in performing certain actions merely because they are unlawful poses a challenge to Hume's theory of evaluation. Then I propose a solution of the challenge which draws on Hume's treatment of malice, and highlights the role played by comparison and the self in these apparently paradoxical passions. Finally, I distinguish three views in contemporary discussions of desiring something under the guise of the bad (negationism, parasitism, at-face-valuism), and I argue that Hume's account stands out as a particularly plausible version of the third view.

  • Authors: 
    Irina Paert;
    Publisher: Informa UK Limited

    As the First World War shattered the old empires, Orthodox Christians in former imperial territories faced a dilemma. Should they remain loyal to their Russian “Mother Church,” from which they were...

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Blandine Courel; Harry K. Robson; Alexandre Lucquin; Ekaterina Dolbunova; Ester Oras; Kamil Adamczak; Søren H. Andersen; Peter Moe Astrup; Maxim Charniauski; Agnieszka Czekaj-Zastawny; +17 more
    Publisher: The Royal Society
    Country: United Kingdom
    Project: EC | INDUCE (695539), EC | INDUCE (695539)

    The introduction of pottery vessels to Europe has long been seen as closely linked with the spread of agriculture and pastoralism from the Near East. The adoption of pottery technology by hunter–gatherers in Northern and Eastern Europe does not fit this paradigm, and its role within these communities is so far unresolved. To investigate the motivations for hunter–gatherer pottery use, here, we present the systematic analysis of the contents of 528 early vessels from the Baltic Sea region, mostly dating to the late 6th–5th millennium cal BC, using molecular and isotopic characterization techniques. The results demonstrate clear sub-regional trends in the use of ceramics by hunter–gatherers; aquatic resources in the Eastern Baltic, non-ruminant animal fats in the Southeastern Baltic, and a more variable use, including ruminant animal products, in the Western Baltic, potentially including dairy. We found surprisingly little evidence for the use of ceramics for non-culinary activities, such as the production of resins. We attribute the emergence of these sub-regional cuisines to the diffusion of new culinary ideas afforded by the adoption of pottery, e.g. cooking and combining foods, but culturally contextualized and influenced by traditional practices.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Aleksei Netšunajev; Sven Nõmm; Aaro Toomela; Kadri Medijainen; Pille Taba;
    Publisher: World Scientific Pub Co Pte Ltd

    Analysis of the sentence writing test is conducted in this paper to support diagnostics of the Parkinsons disease. Drawing and writing tests digitization has become a trend where synergy of machine learning techniques on the one side and knowledge base of the neurology and psychiatry on the other side leading sophisticated result in computer aided diagnostics. Such rapid progress has a drawback. In many cases, decisions made by machine learning algorithm are difficult to explain in a language human practitioner familiar with. The method proposed in this paper employs unsupervised learning techniques to segment the sentence into the individual characters. Then, feature engineering process is applied to describe writing of each letter using a set of kinematic and pressure parameters. Following feature selection process applicability of different machine learning classifiers is evaluated. To guarantee that achieved results may be interpreted by human, two major guidelines are established. The first one is to keep dimensionality of the feature set low. The second one is clear physical meaning of the features describing the writing process. Features describing amount and smoothness of the motion observed during the writing alongside with letter size are considered. Resulting algorithm does not take into account any semantic information or language particularities and therefore may be easily adopted to any language based on Latin or Cyrillic alphabets.

  • Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Tayfun Kasapoglu; Veronika Kalmus;
    Publisher: Intellect
  • Embargo
    Authors: 
    Shota Kakabadze; Andrey Makarychev;
    Publisher: Informa UK Limited
    Country: Estonia
    Project: EC | UPTAKE (691818)

    The article seeks to analyze discourses of two Orthodox Churches—Georgian (GOC) and Russian (ROC)—from the vantage point of their various interconnections with Europe and the ensuing representations of Europe framed in religious terms. Of particular salience are relations between ROC and GOC, on the one hand, and the Roman Catholic Church, on the other, as well as the positioning of both ROC and GOC within the global community of Orthodox Churches. The analyzed political circumstances force religious hierarchs of both institutions, even if they share the similar ambivalence toward the West, to differently reproduce the image of Europe. The broader geopolitical picture puts the GOC in the position of supporting government’s foreign policy agenda which goes in opposition to the Kremlin, in spite of the fact that the former has a lot of common with the Moscow Patriarchate when it comes to criticism toward the Western liberal value systems.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Agnes Kasper; Vlad Vernygora;
    Publisher: Universidad de Deusto

    In the last decade, cybersecurity has swiftly turned into a strategic issue and became an important horizontal policy area in the EU, which is treated in this article as one of the four contemporary political empires. These days, the policy arguably encompasses both internal and external aspects, often making it difficult to assess the level of its actual effectiveness as well as outreach. Initially, the EU’s introverted vision on the issue drove the policy to focus on cyber resilience and strategic autonomy. Evidently, the EU’s strategic narrative that could assist it in leading the process of creating an open, free, stable and secure cyberspace in the digital decade, in the context of international security, is emerging. Thus, this contribution is to test the argument that the EU, utilizing an imperial paradigm (consciously or not), is gradually becoming a global steering power in cybersecurity. In this article, firstly, we identify and examine the process of formation of the EU’s narratives about (its) cyber power. Secondly, we establish a discussion framework to highlight the methodological relevance of the imperial paradigm, cyber power Europe and Strategic Narrative Theory for a multidisciplinary debate on global geo-strategic redesign, in which the EU takes part. Thirdly, we look into bilateral and multilateral forums and processes that deal with cybersecurity and in which the EU participates, in order to understand more specifically how the EU is projecting its cyber-power narratives internationally and how cybersecurity-associated challenges impact current dynamics in other policy domains in the field of international relations. Recibido: 20 noviembre 2020Aceptado: 18 mayo 2021

  • Authors: 
    Irina Mikhaylovna Moiseenko; Natalia Viktorovna Maltseva-Zamkovaja; Natalia Vladimirovna Tšuikina;
    Publisher: Dostoevsky Omsk State University

    The article presents an example how to work with students on the text conceptual compression. The skill of compression and transferring the information of a text is a solid part of communicative competence and it seems to be crucial in the process of verbal communication including professional conversation. There was conducted a beta testing among the 1st year university students in order to evaluate the skills to compress and transfer information. The examination shows that the secondary school graduates do not perform well being asked to compress the information of a text, they are not able to use adequate ways to transform the texts, the final text product does not include all vital conceptual details. The subject group of students was offered a special training, which included a number of exercises aimed on teaching to compress texts. The article also includes the designed course which was applied. As the result of such a focused instruction on text compression studies, the students learned how to highlight the key topics and to use the needed ways of compression. What is more, the final products appeared to be more logical. Hence the proposed research leads to the conclusion that not only such specially designed training is vitally needed, but also that the designed by the researchers exercises are effective.