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79 Research products, page 1 of 8

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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Iman Tahamtan; Lutz Bornmann;
    Publisher: arXiv

    The purpose of this paper is to update the review of Bornmann and Daniel (2008) presenting a narrative review of studies on citations in scientific documents. The current review covers 41 studies published between 2006 and 2018. Bornmann and Daniel (2008) focused on earlier years. The current review describes the (new) studies on citation content and context analyses as well as the studies that explore the citation motivation of scholars through surveys or interviews. One focus in this paper is on the technical developments in the last decade, such as the richer meta-data available and machine-readable formats of scientific papers. These developments have resulted in citation context analyses of large datasets in comprehensive studies (which was not possible previously). Many studies in recent years have used computational and machine learning techniques to determine citation functions and polarities, some of which have attempted to overcome the methodological weaknesses of previous studies. The automated recognition of citation functions seems to have the potential to greatly enhance citation indices and information retrieval capabilities. Our review of the empirical studies demonstrates that a paper may be cited for very different scientific and non-scientific reasons. This result accords with the finding by Bornmann and Daniel (2008). The current review also shows that to better understand the relationship between citing and cited documents, a variety of features should be analyzed, primarily the citation context, the semantics and linguistic patterns in citations, citation locations within the citing document, and citation polarity (negative, neutral, positive). Comment: 56 pages, 4 figures, 11 tables

  • Publication . Preprint . Article . 2018
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Khaled Moustafa;
    Publisher: Arabixiv

    Nature has recently published a Correspondence claiming the absence of fame biases in the editorial choice. The topic is interesting and deserves a deeper analysis than it was presented because the reported brief analysis and its conclusion are somewhat biased for many reasons, some of them are discussed here. Since the editorial assessment is a form of peer-review, the biases reported on external peer-reviews would, thus, apply to the editorial assessment, too. The biases would be proportional to the elitist level of a journal; the more elitist a journal, the more biased its decisions, unavoidably. The bias could be intentional or unintentional, conscious or subconscious, reflecting our imperfect human nature.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Zhiqi Wang; Ronald Rousseau;
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC
    Country: Belgium

    The Yule-Simpson paradox refers to the fact that outcomes of comparisons between groups are reversed when groups are combined. Using Essential Sciences Indicators, a part of InCites (Clarivate), data for countries, it is shown that although the Yule-Simpson phenomenon in citation analysis and research evaluation is not common, it isn't extremely rare either. The Yule-Simpson paradox is a phenomenon one should be aware of, otherwise one may encounter unforeseen surprises in scientometric studies. ispartof: SCIENTOMETRICS vol:126 issue:4 pages:3501-3511 ispartof: location:Switzerland status: published

  • Publication . Conference object . Other literature type . Article . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Martin Wieland; Juan Gorraiz;
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC
    Country: Austria

    AbstractFrom a historical point of view, Rome and especially the University of La Sapienza, are closely linked to two geniuses of Baroque art: Bernini and Borromini. In this study, we analyze the rivalry between them from a scientometric perspective. This study also serves as a basis for exploring which data sources may be appropriate for broad impact assessment of individuals and/or celebrities. We pay special attention to encyclopaedias, library catalogues and other databases or types of publications that are not normally used for this purpose. The results show that some sources such as Wikipedia are not exploited according to the possibilities they offer, especially those related to different languages and cultures. Moreover, analyses are often reduced to a minimum number of data sources, which can distort the relevance of the outcome. Our results show that other sources normally not considered for this purpose, like JSTOR, PQDT, Google Scholar, Catalogue Holdings, etc. can provide more relevant or abundant information than the typically used Web of Science Core Collection and Scopus. Finally, we also contrast opportunities and limitation of old and new (YouTube, Twitter) data sources (particularly the aspects quality and accuracy of the search methods). Much room for improvement has been identified in order to use data sources more efficiently and with higher accuracy.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Mei Hsiu-Ching Ho; John S. Liu;
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC

    Scholars all over the world have produced a large body of COVID-19 literature in an exceptionally short period after the outbreak of this rapidly-spreading virus. An analysis of the literature accumulated in the first 150 days hints that the rapid knowledge accumulation in its early-stage development was expedited through a wide variety of journal platforms, a sense and pressure of national urgency, and inspiration from journal editorials.

  • Publication . Article . Preprint . Other literature type . 2018
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Giovanni Colavizza;
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC
    Country: Switzerland
    Project: SNSF | Understanding Citations i... (168489), SNSF | Linked Books: Reconstruct... (159961)

    The humanities are often characterized by sociologists as having a low mutual dependence among scholars and high task uncertainty. According to Fuchs' theory of scientific change, this leads over time to intellectual and social fragmentation, as new scholarship accumulates in the absence of shared unifying theories. We consider here a set of specialisms in the discipline of history and measure the connectivity properties of their bibliographic coupling networks over time, in order to assess whether fragmentation is indeed occurring. We construct networks using both reference overlap and textual similarity. It is shown that the connectivity of reference overlap networks is gradually and steadily declining over time, whilst that of textual similarity networks is stable. Author bibliographic coupling networks also show signs of a decline in connectivity, in the absence of an increasing propensity for collaborations. We speculate that, despite the gradual weakening of ties among historians as mapped by references, new scholarship might be continually integrated through shared vocabularies and narratives. This would support our belief that citations are but one kind of bibliometric data to consider --- perhaps even of secondary importance --- when studying the humanities, while text should play a more prominent role.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Wolfgang Glänzel; Lin Zhang;
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC

    Proceeding from Moravcsik's paradigmatic ideas of how to build indigenous capability and sustainable science systems in developing countries, we attempted to further focus on the peculiarities of the twenty-first century and the new challenges of globalisation. In doing so, we selected three particular topics deemed relevant in this context: increase of international visibility and reception by the international community, international collaboration and the participation in research in emerging fields. We analysed these issues using the example of 16 developing countries and emerging economies. We found that several countries achieve an impressive citation impact with a considerable share of highly cited papers. The high impact proved to be associated with international collaboration. We also found two extreme situations in international collaboration, both of which might form challenges in building sustainable national science systems and research structures. Research activity in emerging research topics, finally, showed the presence of developing countries in highly topical research and their capability to contribute also to newest research trends.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Liang Meng; Haifeng Wang; Pengfei Han;
    Publisher: Springer International Publishing

    Intriguing unforced regularities in human behaviors have been reported in varied research domains, including scientometrics. In this study we examine the manuscript submission behavior of researchers, with a focus on its monthly pattern. With a large and reliable dataset which records the submission history of articles published on 10 multidisciplinary journals and 10 management journals over a five-year period (2013-2017), we observe a prominent turn-of-the-month submission effect for accepted papers in management journals but not multidisciplinary journals. This effect gets more pronounced in submissions to top-tier journals and when the first day of a month happens to be a Saturday or Sunday. Sense of ceremony is proposed as a likely explanation of this effect, since the first day of a month is a fundamental temporal landmark which has a 'fresh start effect' on researchers. To conclude, an original and interesting day-of-the-month effect in the academia is reported in this study, which calls for more research attention.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Jinseok Kim;
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC
    Project: NSF | Collaborative Research: S... (1535370)

    Author name ambiguity in a digital library may affect the findings of research that mines authorship data of the library. This study evaluates author name disambiguation in DBLP, a widely used but insufficiently evaluated digital library for its disambiguation performance. In doing so, this study takes a triangulation approach that author name disambiguation for a digital library can be better evaluated when its performance is assessed on multiple labeled datasets with comparison to baselines. Tested on three types of labeled data containing 5,000 ~ 700K disambiguated names and 6M pairs of disambiguated names, DBLP is shown to assign author names quite accurately to distinct authors, resulting in pairwise precision, recall, and F1 measures around 0.90 or above overall. DBLP's author name disambiguation performs well even on large ambiguous name blocks but deficiently on distinguishing authors with the same names. When compared to other disambiguation algorithms, DBLP's disambiguation performance is quite competitive, possibly due to its hybrid disambiguation approach combining algorithmic disambiguation and manual error correction. A discussion follows on strengths and weaknesses of labeled datasets used in this study for future efforts to evaluate author name disambiguation on a digital library scale. Scientometrics (2018)

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Alberto Martín-Martín; Enrique Orduña-Malea; Emilio Delgado López-Cózar;
    Publisher: Springer
    Country: Spain

    This article describes a procedure to generate a snapshot of the structure of a specific scientific community and their outputs based on the information available in Google Scholar Citations (GSC). We call this method MADAP (Multifaceted Analysis of Disciplines through Academic Profiles). The international community of researchers working in Bibliometrics, Scientometrics, Informetrics, Webometrics, and Altmetrics was selected as a case study. The records of the top 1,000 most cited documents by these authors according to GSC were manually processed to fill any missing information and deduplicate fields like the journal titles and book publishers. The results suggest that it is feasible to use GSC and the MADAP method to produce an accurate depiction of the community of researchers working in Bibliometrics (both specialists and occasional researchers) and their publication habits (main publication venues such as journals and book publishers). Additionally, the wide document coverage of Google Scholar (specially books and book chapters) enables more comprehensive analyses of the documents published in a specific discipline than were previously possible with other citation indexes, finally shedding light on what until now had been a blind spot in most citation analyses. This is a post-peer-review, pre-copyedit version of an article published in Scientometrics. The final authenticated version is available online at: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-017-2587-4 Research funded by Ministerio de Educación, Cultura y Deporte (FPU2013/05863). Universitat Politècnica de València (PAID-10-14).

Advanced search in Research products
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arrow_drop_down
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The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
79 Research products, page 1 of 8
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Iman Tahamtan; Lutz Bornmann;
    Publisher: arXiv

    The purpose of this paper is to update the review of Bornmann and Daniel (2008) presenting a narrative review of studies on citations in scientific documents. The current review covers 41 studies published between 2006 and 2018. Bornmann and Daniel (2008) focused on earlier years. The current review describes the (new) studies on citation content and context analyses as well as the studies that explore the citation motivation of scholars through surveys or interviews. One focus in this paper is on the technical developments in the last decade, such as the richer meta-data available and machine-readable formats of scientific papers. These developments have resulted in citation context analyses of large datasets in comprehensive studies (which was not possible previously). Many studies in recent years have used computational and machine learning techniques to determine citation functions and polarities, some of which have attempted to overcome the methodological weaknesses of previous studies. The automated recognition of citation functions seems to have the potential to greatly enhance citation indices and information retrieval capabilities. Our review of the empirical studies demonstrates that a paper may be cited for very different scientific and non-scientific reasons. This result accords with the finding by Bornmann and Daniel (2008). The current review also shows that to better understand the relationship between citing and cited documents, a variety of features should be analyzed, primarily the citation context, the semantics and linguistic patterns in citations, citation locations within the citing document, and citation polarity (negative, neutral, positive). Comment: 56 pages, 4 figures, 11 tables

  • Publication . Preprint . Article . 2018
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Khaled Moustafa;
    Publisher: Arabixiv

    Nature has recently published a Correspondence claiming the absence of fame biases in the editorial choice. The topic is interesting and deserves a deeper analysis than it was presented because the reported brief analysis and its conclusion are somewhat biased for many reasons, some of them are discussed here. Since the editorial assessment is a form of peer-review, the biases reported on external peer-reviews would, thus, apply to the editorial assessment, too. The biases would be proportional to the elitist level of a journal; the more elitist a journal, the more biased its decisions, unavoidably. The bias could be intentional or unintentional, conscious or subconscious, reflecting our imperfect human nature.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Zhiqi Wang; Ronald Rousseau;
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC
    Country: Belgium

    The Yule-Simpson paradox refers to the fact that outcomes of comparisons between groups are reversed when groups are combined. Using Essential Sciences Indicators, a part of InCites (Clarivate), data for countries, it is shown that although the Yule-Simpson phenomenon in citation analysis and research evaluation is not common, it isn't extremely rare either. The Yule-Simpson paradox is a phenomenon one should be aware of, otherwise one may encounter unforeseen surprises in scientometric studies. ispartof: SCIENTOMETRICS vol:126 issue:4 pages:3501-3511 ispartof: location:Switzerland status: published

  • Publication . Conference object . Other literature type . Article . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Martin Wieland; Juan Gorraiz;
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC
    Country: Austria

    AbstractFrom a historical point of view, Rome and especially the University of La Sapienza, are closely linked to two geniuses of Baroque art: Bernini and Borromini. In this study, we analyze the rivalry between them from a scientometric perspective. This study also serves as a basis for exploring which data sources may be appropriate for broad impact assessment of individuals and/or celebrities. We pay special attention to encyclopaedias, library catalogues and other databases or types of publications that are not normally used for this purpose. The results show that some sources such as Wikipedia are not exploited according to the possibilities they offer, especially those related to different languages and cultures. Moreover, analyses are often reduced to a minimum number of data sources, which can distort the relevance of the outcome. Our results show that other sources normally not considered for this purpose, like JSTOR, PQDT, Google Scholar, Catalogue Holdings, etc. can provide more relevant or abundant information than the typically used Web of Science Core Collection and Scopus. Finally, we also contrast opportunities and limitation of old and new (YouTube, Twitter) data sources (particularly the aspects quality and accuracy of the search methods). Much room for improvement has been identified in order to use data sources more efficiently and with higher accuracy.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Mei Hsiu-Ching Ho; John S. Liu;
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC

    Scholars all over the world have produced a large body of COVID-19 literature in an exceptionally short period after the outbreak of this rapidly-spreading virus. An analysis of the literature accumulated in the first 150 days hints that the rapid knowledge accumulation in its early-stage development was expedited through a wide variety of journal platforms, a sense and pressure of national urgency, and inspiration from journal editorials.

  • Publication . Article . Preprint . Other literature type . 2018
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Giovanni Colavizza;
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC
    Country: Switzerland
    Project: SNSF | Understanding Citations i... (168489), SNSF | Linked Books: Reconstruct... (159961)

    The humanities are often characterized by sociologists as having a low mutual dependence among scholars and high task uncertainty. According to Fuchs' theory of scientific change, this leads over time to intellectual and social fragmentation, as new scholarship accumulates in the absence of shared unifying theories. We consider here a set of specialisms in the discipline of history and measure the connectivity properties of their bibliographic coupling networks over time, in order to assess whether fragmentation is indeed occurring. We construct networks using both reference overlap and textual similarity. It is shown that the connectivity of reference overlap networks is gradually and steadily declining over time, whilst that of textual similarity networks is stable. Author bibliographic coupling networks also show signs of a decline in connectivity, in the absence of an increasing propensity for collaborations. We speculate that, despite the gradual weakening of ties among historians as mapped by references, new scholarship might be continually integrated through shared vocabularies and narratives. This would support our belief that citations are but one kind of bibliometric data to consider --- perhaps even of secondary importance --- when studying the humanities, while text should play a more prominent role.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Wolfgang Glänzel; Lin Zhang;
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC

    Proceeding from Moravcsik's paradigmatic ideas of how to build indigenous capability and sustainable science systems in developing countries, we attempted to further focus on the peculiarities of the twenty-first century and the new challenges of globalisation. In doing so, we selected three particular topics deemed relevant in this context: increase of international visibility and reception by the international community, international collaboration and the participation in research in emerging fields. We analysed these issues using the example of 16 developing countries and emerging economies. We found that several countries achieve an impressive citation impact with a considerable share of highly cited papers. The high impact proved to be associated with international collaboration. We also found two extreme situations in international collaboration, both of which might form challenges in building sustainable national science systems and research structures. Research activity in emerging research topics, finally, showed the presence of developing countries in highly topical research and their capability to contribute also to newest research trends.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Liang Meng; Haifeng Wang; Pengfei Han;
    Publisher: Springer International Publishing

    Intriguing unforced regularities in human behaviors have been reported in varied research domains, including scientometrics. In this study we examine the manuscript submission behavior of researchers, with a focus on its monthly pattern. With a large and reliable dataset which records the submission history of articles published on 10 multidisciplinary journals and 10 management journals over a five-year period (2013-2017), we observe a prominent turn-of-the-month submission effect for accepted papers in management journals but not multidisciplinary journals. This effect gets more pronounced in submissions to top-tier journals and when the first day of a month happens to be a Saturday or Sunday. Sense of ceremony is proposed as a likely explanation of this effect, since the first day of a month is a fundamental temporal landmark which has a 'fresh start effect' on researchers. To conclude, an original and interesting day-of-the-month effect in the academia is reported in this study, which calls for more research attention.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Jinseok Kim;
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC
    Project: NSF | Collaborative Research: S... (1535370)

    Author name ambiguity in a digital library may affect the findings of research that mines authorship data of the library. This study evaluates author name disambiguation in DBLP, a widely used but insufficiently evaluated digital library for its disambiguation performance. In doing so, this study takes a triangulation approach that author name disambiguation for a digital library can be better evaluated when its performance is assessed on multiple labeled datasets with comparison to baselines. Tested on three types of labeled data containing 5,000 ~ 700K disambiguated names and 6M pairs of disambiguated names, DBLP is shown to assign author names quite accurately to distinct authors, resulting in pairwise precision, recall, and F1 measures around 0.90 or above overall. DBLP's author name disambiguation performs well even on large ambiguous name blocks but deficiently on distinguishing authors with the same names. When compared to other disambiguation algorithms, DBLP's disambiguation performance is quite competitive, possibly due to its hybrid disambiguation approach combining algorithmic disambiguation and manual error correction. A discussion follows on strengths and weaknesses of labeled datasets used in this study for future efforts to evaluate author name disambiguation on a digital library scale. Scientometrics (2018)

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Alberto Martín-Martín; Enrique Orduña-Malea; Emilio Delgado López-Cózar;
    Publisher: Springer
    Country: Spain

    This article describes a procedure to generate a snapshot of the structure of a specific scientific community and their outputs based on the information available in Google Scholar Citations (GSC). We call this method MADAP (Multifaceted Analysis of Disciplines through Academic Profiles). The international community of researchers working in Bibliometrics, Scientometrics, Informetrics, Webometrics, and Altmetrics was selected as a case study. The records of the top 1,000 most cited documents by these authors according to GSC were manually processed to fill any missing information and deduplicate fields like the journal titles and book publishers. The results suggest that it is feasible to use GSC and the MADAP method to produce an accurate depiction of the community of researchers working in Bibliometrics (both specialists and occasional researchers) and their publication habits (main publication venues such as journals and book publishers). Additionally, the wide document coverage of Google Scholar (specially books and book chapters) enables more comprehensive analyses of the documents published in a specific discipline than were previously possible with other citation indexes, finally shedding light on what until now had been a blind spot in most citation analyses. This is a post-peer-review, pre-copyedit version of an article published in Scientometrics. The final authenticated version is available online at: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-017-2587-4 Research funded by Ministerio de Educación, Cultura y Deporte (FPU2013/05863). Universitat Politècnica de València (PAID-10-14).