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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kun Sun; Haitao Liu; Wenxin Xiong;
    Project: EC | WIDE (742545)

    AbstractScientific writings, as one essential part of human culture, have evolved over centuries into their current form. Knowing how scientific writings evolved is particularly helpful in understanding how trends in scientific culture developed. It also allows us to better understand how scientific culture was interwoven with human culture generally. The availability of massive digitized texts and the progress in computational technologies today provide us with a convenient and credible way to discern the evolutionary patterns in scientific writings by examining the diachronic linguistic changes. The linguistic changes in scientific writings reflect the genre shifts that took place with historical changes in science and scientific writings. This study investigates a general evolutionary linguistic pattern in scientific writings. It does so by merging two credible computational methods: relative entropy; word-embedding concreteness and imageability. It thus creates a novel quantitative methodology and applies this to the examination of diachronic changes in the Philosophical Transactions of Royal Society (PTRS, 1665–1869). The data from two computational approaches can be well mapped to support the argument that this journal followed the evolutionary trend of increasing professionalization and specialization. But it also shows that language use in this journal was greatly influenced by historical events and other socio-cultural factors. This study, as a “culturomic” approach, demonstrates that the linguistic evolutionary patterns in scientific discourse have been interrupted by external factors even though this scientific discourse would likely have cumulatively developed into a professional and specialized genre. The approaches proposed by this study can make a great contribution to full-text analysis in scientometrics.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rob Boddice;
    Publisher: Universidad de los Andes
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | IDEM (742470)

    This article briefly appraises the state of the art in the history of emotions, looking to its theoretical and methodological underpinnings and some of the notable scholarship in the contemporary field. The predominant focus, however, lies on the future direction of the history of emotions, based on a convergence of the humanities and neurosciences, and according to important observations about the biocultural status of human beings. While the article stops short of exhorting historians to become competent neuroscientists themselves, it does demand that historians of emotions take note of the implications of social neuroscientific research in particular, with a view to capturing the potential of the emotions to unlock the history of experience, and with a mind to unlocking the political importance of work in this area, namely, the shifting ground of what it means —how it feels— to be human.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Daniel Harasim; Fabian C. Moss; Matthias Ramirez; Martin Rohrmeier;
    Country: Switzerland
    Project: EC | PMSB (760081)

    AbstractTonality is one of the most central theoretical concepts for the analysis of Western classical music. This study presents a novel approach for the study of its historical development, exploring in particular the concept of mode. Based on a large dataset of approximately 13,000 musical pieces in MIDI format, we present two models to infer both the number and characteristics of modes of different historical periods from first principles: a geometric model of modes as clusters of musical pieces in a non-Euclidean space, and a cognitively plausible Bayesian model of modes as Dirichlet distributions. We use the geometric model to determine the optimal number of modes for five historical epochs via unsupervised learning and apply the probabilistic model to infer the characteristics of the modes. Our results show that the inference of four modes is most plausible in the Renaissance, that two modes–corresponding to major and minor–are most appropriate in the Baroque and Classical eras, whereas no clear separation into distinct modes is found for the 19th century.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Federica Bressan; Sergio Canazza; Tim Vets; Marc Leman;
    Publisher: Springer
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | DaphNet (703937)

    This article proposes a reflection on what the emerging discipline of digital philology means to the encoding, preservation and access of multimedia cultural material. In particular, it focuses on audio recordings and interactive multimedia installations. It describes a general setup required for the re-mediation of audio recordings that supports a philologically informed methodology for long-term preservation, and it points out some of the major challenges posed by interactive art in long-term preservation. This article extends the discussion started at the IRCDL in 2013, in the light of the authors’ activity during this time.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Christos Hadjipanayi; Eleni Demitriadou; Haris Frangou; Maria Papageorgiou; Christina Zavlanou; Andreas Lanitis;
    Publisher: Springer International Publishing
    Country: Cyprus
    Project: EC | RISE (739578)

    The aim of our work is to investigate the applicability of Virtual Re-ality (VR) in raising awareness of users in relation to the destruction of im-portant monuments. The proposed methodology involves the exposure of users to three virtual environments displaying the original state of a monument, the current state and the predicted future state of the same monument in the case that the monument is not maintained. The exposure to the three states of the same building allows the user to experience the “glorious days” of a monument and compare them to the current and future states in an attempt to realize the level of destruction that could occur to the building if the monument is not maintained properly. As part of a pilot case study, a number of volunteers were asked to navigate in virtual environments depicting the three chronological states of a landmark building. Preliminary results indicate a significant increase of the intensity of negative emotions of the users, indicating the applicability of VR in alerting the society toward the destruction of important monuments.

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Advanced search in Research products
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The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
5 Research products, page 1 of 1
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kun Sun; Haitao Liu; Wenxin Xiong;
    Project: EC | WIDE (742545)

    AbstractScientific writings, as one essential part of human culture, have evolved over centuries into their current form. Knowing how scientific writings evolved is particularly helpful in understanding how trends in scientific culture developed. It also allows us to better understand how scientific culture was interwoven with human culture generally. The availability of massive digitized texts and the progress in computational technologies today provide us with a convenient and credible way to discern the evolutionary patterns in scientific writings by examining the diachronic linguistic changes. The linguistic changes in scientific writings reflect the genre shifts that took place with historical changes in science and scientific writings. This study investigates a general evolutionary linguistic pattern in scientific writings. It does so by merging two credible computational methods: relative entropy; word-embedding concreteness and imageability. It thus creates a novel quantitative methodology and applies this to the examination of diachronic changes in the Philosophical Transactions of Royal Society (PTRS, 1665–1869). The data from two computational approaches can be well mapped to support the argument that this journal followed the evolutionary trend of increasing professionalization and specialization. But it also shows that language use in this journal was greatly influenced by historical events and other socio-cultural factors. This study, as a “culturomic” approach, demonstrates that the linguistic evolutionary patterns in scientific discourse have been interrupted by external factors even though this scientific discourse would likely have cumulatively developed into a professional and specialized genre. The approaches proposed by this study can make a great contribution to full-text analysis in scientometrics.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rob Boddice;
    Publisher: Universidad de los Andes
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | IDEM (742470)

    This article briefly appraises the state of the art in the history of emotions, looking to its theoretical and methodological underpinnings and some of the notable scholarship in the contemporary field. The predominant focus, however, lies on the future direction of the history of emotions, based on a convergence of the humanities and neurosciences, and according to important observations about the biocultural status of human beings. While the article stops short of exhorting historians to become competent neuroscientists themselves, it does demand that historians of emotions take note of the implications of social neuroscientific research in particular, with a view to capturing the potential of the emotions to unlock the history of experience, and with a mind to unlocking the political importance of work in this area, namely, the shifting ground of what it means —how it feels— to be human.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Daniel Harasim; Fabian C. Moss; Matthias Ramirez; Martin Rohrmeier;
    Country: Switzerland
    Project: EC | PMSB (760081)

    AbstractTonality is one of the most central theoretical concepts for the analysis of Western classical music. This study presents a novel approach for the study of its historical development, exploring in particular the concept of mode. Based on a large dataset of approximately 13,000 musical pieces in MIDI format, we present two models to infer both the number and characteristics of modes of different historical periods from first principles: a geometric model of modes as clusters of musical pieces in a non-Euclidean space, and a cognitively plausible Bayesian model of modes as Dirichlet distributions. We use the geometric model to determine the optimal number of modes for five historical epochs via unsupervised learning and apply the probabilistic model to infer the characteristics of the modes. Our results show that the inference of four modes is most plausible in the Renaissance, that two modes–corresponding to major and minor–are most appropriate in the Baroque and Classical eras, whereas no clear separation into distinct modes is found for the 19th century.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Federica Bressan; Sergio Canazza; Tim Vets; Marc Leman;
    Publisher: Springer
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | DaphNet (703937)

    This article proposes a reflection on what the emerging discipline of digital philology means to the encoding, preservation and access of multimedia cultural material. In particular, it focuses on audio recordings and interactive multimedia installations. It describes a general setup required for the re-mediation of audio recordings that supports a philologically informed methodology for long-term preservation, and it points out some of the major challenges posed by interactive art in long-term preservation. This article extends the discussion started at the IRCDL in 2013, in the light of the authors’ activity during this time.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Christos Hadjipanayi; Eleni Demitriadou; Haris Frangou; Maria Papageorgiou; Christina Zavlanou; Andreas Lanitis;
    Publisher: Springer International Publishing
    Country: Cyprus
    Project: EC | RISE (739578)

    The aim of our work is to investigate the applicability of Virtual Re-ality (VR) in raising awareness of users in relation to the destruction of im-portant monuments. The proposed methodology involves the exposure of users to three virtual environments displaying the original state of a monument, the current state and the predicted future state of the same monument in the case that the monument is not maintained. The exposure to the three states of the same building allows the user to experience the “glorious days” of a monument and compare them to the current and future states in an attempt to realize the level of destruction that could occur to the building if the monument is not maintained properly. As part of a pilot case study, a number of volunteers were asked to navigate in virtual environments depicting the three chronological states of a landmark building. Preliminary results indicate a significant increase of the intensity of negative emotions of the users, indicating the applicability of VR in alerting the society toward the destruction of important monuments.

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