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30 Research products, page 1 of 3

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Magdalena Roszczynska-Kurasinska; Anna Domaradzka; Anna Wnuk; Tomasz Oleksy;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | CLIC (776758)

    In order to remain alive and relevant, cultural heritage sites have to react and adapt to changing context in a coherent manner, i.e., in a way that is in line with the memory and identity of the place. The incoherent changes, i.e., the transformations that according to the local community do not agree with a character of a place, can be destructive for the long-term vitality of urban cultural heritage. In this study, we test which factors influence social acceptance of different alternations within the context of urban historical gardens that might, in turn, ensure the resilience of the place. Our study focuses on the intangible qualities of the place measured by intrinsic value, perceived essentialism and anti-essentialism as important predictors shaping the response to change. The correlational study was conducted using an online questionnaire designed to empirically grasp intangible qualities of cultural heritage sites. Five hundred twenty-nine responses were included in the analysis. The study shows that perceived historic value, inherent value (uniqueness and importance of the place) and (anti-)essentialist character of a place capture the differences between parks well and enables the finding of interventions that are coherent with a site’s genius loci. Measuring intangible qualities of urban gardens can help to design changes that find higher approval among local community members and users of the site. We discuss how the analysis of an intrinsic value and essentialism allows for planning better spatial interventions that align with the human-centered approach to urban development.

  • Publication . Conference object . Article . Part of book or chapter of book . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Artem Usov; Ornela Dardha;
    Countries: United Kingdom, France
    Project: UKRI | From Data Types to Sessio... (EP/K034413/1), EC | BEHAPI (778233)

    Part 4: Communications: Types and Implementations; International audience; There are two approaches to defining subtyping relations: the syntactic and the semantic approach. In semantic subtyping, one defines a model of the language and an interpretation of types as subsets of this model. Subtyping is defined as inclusion of subsets denoting types.An orthogonal subtyping question, typical of object-oriented languages, is the nominal versus the structural subtyping. Dardha et al. [11, 12] defined boolean types and semantic subtyping for Featherweight Java (FJ) and integrated both nominal and structural subtyping, thus exploiting the benefits of both approaches. However, these benefits were illustrated only at a theoretical level, but not exploited practically.We present SFJ—Semantic Featherweight Java, an implementation of FJ which features boolean types, semantic subtyping and integrates nominal as well as structural subtyping. The benefits of SFJ, illustrated in the paper and the accompanying video (with audio/subtitles) [27], show how static type-checking of boolean types and semantic subtyping gives higher guarantees of program correctness, more flexibility and compactness of program writing.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Enora Gandon; Tetsushi Nonaka; Raphael Sonabend; John Endler;
    Publisher: Public Library of Science (PLoS)
    Project: EC | SKILL (793451)

    Studies have documented that traditional motor skills (i.e. motor habits) are part of the cultural way of life that characterises each society. Yet, it is still unclear to what extent motor skills are inherited through culture. Drawing on ethnology and motor behaviour, we addressed this issue through a detailed description of traditional pottery skills. Our goal was to quantify the influence of three kinds of constraints: the transcultural constraints of wheelthrowing, the cultural constraints induced via cultural transmission, and the potters’ individual constraints. Five expert Nepalese potters were invited to produce three familiar pottery types, each in five specimens. A total of 31 different fashioning hand positions were identified. Most of them (14) were cross-cultural, ten positions were cultural, five positions were individual, and two positions were unique. Statistical tests indicated that the subset of positions used by the participants in this study were distinct from those of other cultural groups. Behaviours described in terms of fashioning duration, number of gestures, and hand position repertoires size highlighted both individual and cross-cultural traits. We also analysed the time series of the successive hand positions used throughout the fashioning of each vessel. Results showed, for each pottery type, strong reproducible sequences at the individual level and a clearly higher level of variability between potters. Overall, our findings confirm the existence of a cultural transmission in craft skills but also demonstrated that the skill is not fully determined by a cultural marking. We conclude that the influence of culture on craft skills should not be overstated, even if its role is significant given the fact that it reflects the socially transmitted part of the skill. Such research offers insights into archaeological problems in providing a representative view of how cultural constraints influence the motor skills implied in artefact manufacturing.

  • Publication . Other literature type . Conference object . 2016
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Davis, Brian; Cortis, Keith; Vasiliu, Laurentiu; Koumpis, Adamatios; Handschuh, Siegfried; McDermott, Ross;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Ireland
    Project: EC | SSIX (645425)

    Social Sentiment Indices powered by X-Scores (SSIX) seeks to address the challenge of extracting relevant and valuable economic signals in a cross-lingual fashion from the vast variety of and increasingly influential social media services, such as Twitter, Google+, Facebook, StockTwits and LinkedIn, and in conjunction with the most reliable and authoritative newswires, online newspapers, financial news networks, trade publications and blogs. A statistical framework of qualitative and quantitative parameters called X-Scores will power SSIX. This framework will interpret economically significant sentiment signals that are disseminated in the social ecosystem. Using X-Scores, SSIX will create commercially viable and exploitable social sentiment indices, regardless of language, locale and data format. SSIX and X-Scores will support research and investment decision making for European SMEs, enabling end users to analyse and leverage real-time social media sentiment data in their domain, creating innovative products and services to support revenue growth with focus on increased alpha generation for investment portfolios. European Union’s Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Programme ICT 2014 - Information and Communications Technologies under grant agreement No. 645425. peer-reviewed

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    John P. McCrae;
    Project: EC | Pret-a-LLOD (825182), EC | ELEXIS (731015)

    Neologism detection is a key task in the constructing of lexical resources and has wider implications for NLP, however the identification of multiword neologisms has received little attention. In this paper, we show that we can effectively identify the distinction between compositional and non-compositional adjective-noun pairs by using pretrained language models and comparing this with individual word embeddings. Our results show that the use of these models significantly improves over baseline linguistic features, however the combination with linguistic features still further improves the results, suggesting the strength of a hybrid approach.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Albert Kohn;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | BeyondtheElite (681507)

    In recent years, pre-modern beds have generated extensive scholarly interest. Their social, religious, and economic importance has been rightfully highlighted in the study of domestic piety. Yet, concern has primarily focused on beds in late medieval English homes. This essay uses Hebrew texts from thirteenth-century Southern Germany, primarily Sefer Hasidim, to further this analysis of the role of the bed in shaping medieval domestic devotion. Jewish notions about the social, moral, and sexual significance of the bed reflect those identified in late medieval Christian culture. These ideas inspired numerous rituals practiced in Jewish homes. Yet, the bed and the remnants of sex assumed to be found in it also frustrated Jewish attempts to perform domestic devotion. These findings highlight the complicated nature of the home and how medieval people had to navigate both its opportunities and challenges in order to foster a rich culture of domestic devotion.

  • Open Access English

    Although lexical borrowing is an important aspect of language evolution, there have been few attempts to automate the identification of borrowings in lexical datasets. Moreover, none of the solutions which have been proposed so far identify borrowings across multiple languages. This study proposes a new method for the task and tests it on a newly compiled large comparative dataset of 48 South-East Asian languages from Southern China. The method yields very promising results, while it is conceptually straightforward and easy to apply. This makes the approach a perfect candidate for computer-assisted exploratory studies on lexical borrowing in contact areas.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kerstin Schoch; Harald Gruber; Thomas Ostermann;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Abstract Art therapy theory assumes that art work is related to differential constructs of the artist. Empirically, this hypothesis has not been established because findings based on quantitative methods are rare. The Rating Instrument for two-dimensional Pictorial Work (RizbA) is designed to address this issue. The construct − pictorial expression − is theoretically defined by seven content areas: representation , color , shape , space , motion , composition , expression . In combination these create the overall test construct. The test development is based on art historical and art therapeutic theories, and the findings are supported empirically. Two online studies were conducted using a sample of nine pictures. These were rated by experts ( n 1 = 12, n 2 = 8). In the first study, based on psychometric characteristics, an item pool of 113 items was examined and a preliminary test version developed. The second study examined quality criteria of the preliminary version. For both studies, factor analyses were computed. The preliminary version includes 26 items. Its ability for differentiation between pictorial works ranges between .897 (T1) and .766 (T2), its inter-rater reliability between .525 (T1) and .917 (T2). Test-retest reliability is .919. PCA suggests a four-factors solution, which in large part is consistent across studies. As a reliable measurement RizbA opens new perspectives in fundamental art therapeutic and psychological research.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Christos Hadjipanayi; Eleni Demitriadou; Haris Frangou; Maria Papageorgiou; Christina Zavlanou; Andreas Lanitis;
    Publisher: Springer International Publishing
    Country: Cyprus
    Project: EC | RISE (739578)

    The aim of our work is to investigate the applicability of Virtual Re-ality (VR) in raising awareness of users in relation to the destruction of im-portant monuments. The proposed methodology involves the exposure of users to three virtual environments displaying the original state of a monument, the current state and the predicted future state of the same monument in the case that the monument is not maintained. The exposure to the three states of the same building allows the user to experience the “glorious days” of a monument and compare them to the current and future states in an attempt to realize the level of destruction that could occur to the building if the monument is not maintained properly. As part of a pilot case study, a number of volunteers were asked to navigate in virtual environments depicting the three chronological states of a landmark building. Preliminary results indicate a significant increase of the intensity of negative emotions of the users, indicating the applicability of VR in alerting the society toward the destruction of important monuments.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Katerina El Raheb; Nicolas Papapetrou; Vivi Katifori; Yannis Ioannidis;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | WhoLoDancE (688865)

    In this paper, we present BalOnSe (named after the ballet step balance), an ontology-based web interface that allows the user to annotate classical ballet videos, with a hierarchical domain-specific vocabulary and provides an archival system for videos of dance. The interface integrates a hierarchical vocabulary based on classical ballet syllabus terminology (Ballet.owl) implemented as an OWL-2 ontology. BalOnSe supports the search and browsing of the multimedia content using metadata (title, dancer featured, etc.), and also implements the functionality of "searching by movement concepts", i.e., filtering the videos that are associated with particular required terms of the vocabulary, based on previously submitted annotations. In the paper, we present the ballet.owl ontology, and its structure, explaining the conceptual modelling decisions. We highlight the main functionality of the system and finally, we present how the manual ontology guided annotation allows the user to search the content through the vocabularies and also view statistics in the form of tag clouds.

Advanced search in Research products
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Searching FieldsTerms
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Include:
The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
30 Research products, page 1 of 3
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Magdalena Roszczynska-Kurasinska; Anna Domaradzka; Anna Wnuk; Tomasz Oleksy;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | CLIC (776758)

    In order to remain alive and relevant, cultural heritage sites have to react and adapt to changing context in a coherent manner, i.e., in a way that is in line with the memory and identity of the place. The incoherent changes, i.e., the transformations that according to the local community do not agree with a character of a place, can be destructive for the long-term vitality of urban cultural heritage. In this study, we test which factors influence social acceptance of different alternations within the context of urban historical gardens that might, in turn, ensure the resilience of the place. Our study focuses on the intangible qualities of the place measured by intrinsic value, perceived essentialism and anti-essentialism as important predictors shaping the response to change. The correlational study was conducted using an online questionnaire designed to empirically grasp intangible qualities of cultural heritage sites. Five hundred twenty-nine responses were included in the analysis. The study shows that perceived historic value, inherent value (uniqueness and importance of the place) and (anti-)essentialist character of a place capture the differences between parks well and enables the finding of interventions that are coherent with a site’s genius loci. Measuring intangible qualities of urban gardens can help to design changes that find higher approval among local community members and users of the site. We discuss how the analysis of an intrinsic value and essentialism allows for planning better spatial interventions that align with the human-centered approach to urban development.

  • Publication . Conference object . Article . Part of book or chapter of book . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Artem Usov; Ornela Dardha;
    Countries: United Kingdom, France
    Project: UKRI | From Data Types to Sessio... (EP/K034413/1), EC | BEHAPI (778233)

    Part 4: Communications: Types and Implementations; International audience; There are two approaches to defining subtyping relations: the syntactic and the semantic approach. In semantic subtyping, one defines a model of the language and an interpretation of types as subsets of this model. Subtyping is defined as inclusion of subsets denoting types.An orthogonal subtyping question, typical of object-oriented languages, is the nominal versus the structural subtyping. Dardha et al. [11, 12] defined boolean types and semantic subtyping for Featherweight Java (FJ) and integrated both nominal and structural subtyping, thus exploiting the benefits of both approaches. However, these benefits were illustrated only at a theoretical level, but not exploited practically.We present SFJ—Semantic Featherweight Java, an implementation of FJ which features boolean types, semantic subtyping and integrates nominal as well as structural subtyping. The benefits of SFJ, illustrated in the paper and the accompanying video (with audio/subtitles) [27], show how static type-checking of boolean types and semantic subtyping gives higher guarantees of program correctness, more flexibility and compactness of program writing.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Enora Gandon; Tetsushi Nonaka; Raphael Sonabend; John Endler;
    Publisher: Public Library of Science (PLoS)
    Project: EC | SKILL (793451)

    Studies have documented that traditional motor skills (i.e. motor habits) are part of the cultural way of life that characterises each society. Yet, it is still unclear to what extent motor skills are inherited through culture. Drawing on ethnology and motor behaviour, we addressed this issue through a detailed description of traditional pottery skills. Our goal was to quantify the influence of three kinds of constraints: the transcultural constraints of wheelthrowing, the cultural constraints induced via cultural transmission, and the potters’ individual constraints. Five expert Nepalese potters were invited to produce three familiar pottery types, each in five specimens. A total of 31 different fashioning hand positions were identified. Most of them (14) were cross-cultural, ten positions were cultural, five positions were individual, and two positions were unique. Statistical tests indicated that the subset of positions used by the participants in this study were distinct from those of other cultural groups. Behaviours described in terms of fashioning duration, number of gestures, and hand position repertoires size highlighted both individual and cross-cultural traits. We also analysed the time series of the successive hand positions used throughout the fashioning of each vessel. Results showed, for each pottery type, strong reproducible sequences at the individual level and a clearly higher level of variability between potters. Overall, our findings confirm the existence of a cultural transmission in craft skills but also demonstrated that the skill is not fully determined by a cultural marking. We conclude that the influence of culture on craft skills should not be overstated, even if its role is significant given the fact that it reflects the socially transmitted part of the skill. Such research offers insights into archaeological problems in providing a representative view of how cultural constraints influence the motor skills implied in artefact manufacturing.

  • Publication . Other literature type . Conference object . 2016
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Davis, Brian; Cortis, Keith; Vasiliu, Laurentiu; Koumpis, Adamatios; Handschuh, Siegfried; McDermott, Ross;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Ireland
    Project: EC | SSIX (645425)

    Social Sentiment Indices powered by X-Scores (SSIX) seeks to address the challenge of extracting relevant and valuable economic signals in a cross-lingual fashion from the vast variety of and increasingly influential social media services, such as Twitter, Google+, Facebook, StockTwits and LinkedIn, and in conjunction with the most reliable and authoritative newswires, online newspapers, financial news networks, trade publications and blogs. A statistical framework of qualitative and quantitative parameters called X-Scores will power SSIX. This framework will interpret economically significant sentiment signals that are disseminated in the social ecosystem. Using X-Scores, SSIX will create commercially viable and exploitable social sentiment indices, regardless of language, locale and data format. SSIX and X-Scores will support research and investment decision making for European SMEs, enabling end users to analyse and leverage real-time social media sentiment data in their domain, creating innovative products and services to support revenue growth with focus on increased alpha generation for investment portfolios. European Union’s Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Programme ICT 2014 - Information and Communications Technologies under grant agreement No. 645425. peer-reviewed

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    John P. McCrae;
    Project: EC | Pret-a-LLOD (825182), EC | ELEXIS (731015)

    Neologism detection is a key task in the constructing of lexical resources and has wider implications for NLP, however the identification of multiword neologisms has received little attention. In this paper, we show that we can effectively identify the distinction between compositional and non-compositional adjective-noun pairs by using pretrained language models and comparing this with individual word embeddings. Our results show that the use of these models significantly improves over baseline linguistic features, however the combination with linguistic features still further improves the results, suggesting the strength of a hybrid approach.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Albert Kohn;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | BeyondtheElite (681507)

    In recent years, pre-modern beds have generated extensive scholarly interest. Their social, religious, and economic importance has been rightfully highlighted in the study of domestic piety. Yet, concern has primarily focused on beds in late medieval English homes. This essay uses Hebrew texts from thirteenth-century Southern Germany, primarily Sefer Hasidim, to further this analysis of the role of the bed in shaping medieval domestic devotion. Jewish notions about the social, moral, and sexual significance of the bed reflect those identified in late medieval Christian culture. These ideas inspired numerous rituals practiced in Jewish homes. Yet, the bed and the remnants of sex assumed to be found in it also frustrated Jewish attempts to perform domestic devotion. These findings highlight the complicated nature of the home and how medieval people had to navigate both its opportunities and challenges in order to foster a rich culture of domestic devotion.

  • Open Access English

    Although lexical borrowing is an important aspect of language evolution, there have been few attempts to automate the identification of borrowings in lexical datasets. Moreover, none of the solutions which have been proposed so far identify borrowings across multiple languages. This study proposes a new method for the task and tests it on a newly compiled large comparative dataset of 48 South-East Asian languages from Southern China. The method yields very promising results, while it is conceptually straightforward and easy to apply. This makes the approach a perfect candidate for computer-assisted exploratory studies on lexical borrowing in contact areas.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kerstin Schoch; Harald Gruber; Thomas Ostermann;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Abstract Art therapy theory assumes that art work is related to differential constructs of the artist. Empirically, this hypothesis has not been established because findings based on quantitative methods are rare. The Rating Instrument for two-dimensional Pictorial Work (RizbA) is designed to address this issue. The construct − pictorial expression − is theoretically defined by seven content areas: representation , color , shape , space , motion , composition , expression . In combination these create the overall test construct. The test development is based on art historical and art therapeutic theories, and the findings are supported empirically. Two online studies were conducted using a sample of nine pictures. These were rated by experts ( n 1 = 12, n 2 = 8). In the first study, based on psychometric characteristics, an item pool of 113 items was examined and a preliminary test version developed. The second study examined quality criteria of the preliminary version. For both studies, factor analyses were computed. The preliminary version includes 26 items. Its ability for differentiation between pictorial works ranges between .897 (T1) and .766 (T2), its inter-rater reliability between .525 (T1) and .917 (T2). Test-retest reliability is .919. PCA suggests a four-factors solution, which in large part is consistent across studies. As a reliable measurement RizbA opens new perspectives in fundamental art therapeutic and psychological research.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Christos Hadjipanayi; Eleni Demitriadou; Haris Frangou; Maria Papageorgiou; Christina Zavlanou; Andreas Lanitis;
    Publisher: Springer International Publishing
    Country: Cyprus
    Project: EC | RISE (739578)

    The aim of our work is to investigate the applicability of Virtual Re-ality (VR) in raising awareness of users in relation to the destruction of im-portant monuments. The proposed methodology involves the exposure of users to three virtual environments displaying the original state of a monument, the current state and the predicted future state of the same monument in the case that the monument is not maintained. The exposure to the three states of the same building allows the user to experience the “glorious days” of a monument and compare them to the current and future states in an attempt to realize the level of destruction that could occur to the building if the monument is not maintained properly. As part of a pilot case study, a number of volunteers were asked to navigate in virtual environments depicting the three chronological states of a landmark building. Preliminary results indicate a significant increase of the intensity of negative emotions of the users, indicating the applicability of VR in alerting the society toward the destruction of important monuments.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Katerina El Raheb; Nicolas Papapetrou; Vivi Katifori; Yannis Ioannidis;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | WhoLoDancE (688865)

    In this paper, we present BalOnSe (named after the ballet step balance), an ontology-based web interface that allows the user to annotate classical ballet videos, with a hierarchical domain-specific vocabulary and provides an archival system for videos of dance. The interface integrates a hierarchical vocabulary based on classical ballet syllabus terminology (Ballet.owl) implemented as an OWL-2 ontology. BalOnSe supports the search and browsing of the multimedia content using metadata (title, dancer featured, etc.), and also implements the functionality of "searching by movement concepts", i.e., filtering the videos that are associated with particular required terms of the vocabulary, based on previously submitted annotations. In the paper, we present the ballet.owl ontology, and its structure, explaining the conceptual modelling decisions. We highlight the main functionality of the system and finally, we present how the manual ontology guided annotation allows the user to search the content through the vocabularies and also view statistics in the form of tag clouds.