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107 Research products, page 1 of 11

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gómez-Letona, Markel; Arístegui, Javier; Hernández-Hernández, Nauzet; Pérez-Lorenzo, Maria; Alvarez-Salgado, Xose Anton; Teira, Eva; Sebastian, Marta;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: EC | SUMMER (817806)

    This dataset contains the results of the characterisation of the prokaryotic community by flow cytometry and tritiated leucine incorporation from the MAFIA cruise (Migrants and Active Flux In the Atlantic ocean). Samples were collected in the tropical and subtropical Atlantic during the MAFIA cruise (April 2015) on board the BIO Hespérides. Seawater samples were collected at 13 stations (from the Brazilian coast to the Canary Islands), from the surface down to 3500 m, using a General Oceanics oceanographic rosette equipped with 24 l PVC Niskin bottles. Abundance and cell characteristics (high nucleic acid content fraction, cell volume, viability) were based on measurements performed with a FACSCalibur (Becton-Dickinson) flow cytometer. Leucine incorporation rates were estimated with tritiated leucine (Kirchman et al. 1985) using centrifugation and filtration methods (Smith and Azam 1992). Integrated or average values of variables were estimated for the epipelagic (0-200 m), mesopelagic (200-1000 m) and bathypelagic (1000-3000 m) layers, based on an interpolated grid estimated with DIVA. The aim of this dataset was to estimate the influence of surface productivity on the standing stock, characteristics and activity (as leucine incorporation) of prokaryotes across the water column.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Vahlenkamp, Maximilian; De Vleeschouwer, David; Batenburg, Sietske J; Edgar, Kirsty M; Hanson, C E; Martinez, Mathieu; Pälike, Heiko; MacLeod, Kenneth G; Li, Yong-Xiang; Richter, Carl; +4 more
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: EC | EARTHSEQUENCING (617462), NSF | Management and Operations... (1326927), UKRI | Exploring the roles of oc... (NE/R012350/1)

    The geologic time scale for the Cenozoic Era has been notably improved over the last decades by virtue of integrated stratigraphy, combining high-resolution astrochronologies, biostratigraphy and magnetostratigraphy with high-precision radioisotopic dates. However, the middle Eocene remains a weak link. The so-called "Eocene time scale gap" reflects the scarcity of suitable study sections with clear astronomically-forced variations in carbonate content, primarily because large parts of the oceans were starved of carbonate during the Eocene greenhouse. International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 369 cored a carbonate-rich sedimentary sequence of Eocene age in the Mentelle Basin (Site U1514, offshore southwest Australia). The sequence consists of nannofossil chalk and exhibits rhythmic clay content variability. Here, we show that IODP Site U1514 allows for the extraction of an astronomical signal and the construction of an Eocene astrochronology, using 3-cm resolution X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) core scans. The XRF-derived ratio between calcium and iron content (Ca/Fe) tracks the lithologic variability and serves as the basis for our U1514 astrochronology. We present a 16 million-year-long (40-56 Ma) nearly continuous history of Eocene sedimentation with variations paced by eccentricity and obliquity. We supplement the high-resolution XRF data with low-resolution bulk carbon and oxygen isotopes, recording the long-term cooling trend from the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM - ca. 56 Ma) into the middle Eocene (ca. 40 Ma). Our early Eocene astrochronology corroborates existing chronologies based on deep-sea sites and Italian land sections. For the middle Eocene, the sedimentological record at U1514 provides a single-site geochemical backbone and thus offers a further step towards a fully integrated Cenozoic geologic time scale at orbital resolution.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dietze, Elisabeth; Karger, Cornelia; Mangelsdorf, Kai;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: EC | GlacialLegacy (772852)

    We freeze-dried and homogenized 44 samples of c. 0.7-1.8 g dry sediment from core PG1351 covering late glacials and interglacials of MIS 8 to MIS 5e, integrating sediment of 1 cm core depth. Temporal resolution of these samples ranges from 140 to 960 years per sample. For the period between 430 and 405 kyrs ago (end of MIS 12 to MIS 11c), 13 samples of 0.5-1.3 g of dry sediment from ICDP core 5011-1 were taken for MA analyses, integrating sediment of 2 cm core depth. Eight of these 13 samples are from the same core depths as were previously analysed for pollen (Melles et al., 2012). Temporal resolution of these samples varies between 200 and 970 years per sample comparable to core PG1351. Across all samples, temporal resolution is 333 ± 273 years per sample, giving centennial- to millennial scale averages. We extracted the polar lipids of all MA samples using a Dionex Accelerated Solvent Extraction system (ASE 350, ThermoFisher Scientific) at 100°C, 103 bar pressure and two extraction cycles (20 min static time) with 100 % methanol, after an ASE cycle with 100 % dichloromethane. For every sample sequence (n=13-18), we extracted a blank ASE cell and included it in all further steps. We added 60 ng of deuterated levoglucosan (C6H3D7O5; dLVG; Th. Geyer GmbH & Co. KG) as internal standard, and filtered the extract over a PTFE filter using acetonitrile and 5 % HPLC-grade water. We analysed the extracts with an Ultimate 3000 RS ultra-high performance liquid chromatograph (U-HPLC) with thermostated autosampler and column oven coupled to a Q Exactive Plus Orbitrap mass spectrometer (Quadrupole-Orbitrap MS; ThermoFisher Scientific) with heated electrospray injection (HESI) probe at GFZ Potsdam, using measurement conditions adapted from earlier studies (Hopmans et al., 2013;Schreuder et al., 2018;Dietze et al., 2019). Briefly, separation was achieved on two Xbridge BEH amide columns in series (2.1 x 150 mm, 3.5 um particle size) fitted with a 50 mm pre-column of the same material (Waters). The compounds were eluted (flow rate 0.2 mL min-1) with 100 % A for 15 minutes, followed by column cleaning with 100 % B for 15 min, and re-equilibration to starting conditions for 25 min. Eluent A was acetonitrile:water:triethylamine (92.5:7.5:0.01) and eluent B acetonitrile:water:triethylamine (70:30:0.01). HESI settings were as follows: sheath gas (N2) pressure 20 (arbitrary units), auxiliary gas (N2) pressure 3 (arbitrary units), auxiliary gas (N2) temperature of 50 ˚C, spray voltage -2.9 kV (negative ion mode), capillary temperature 300 °C, S-Lens 50 V. Detection was achieved by monitoring m/z 150-200 with a resolution of 280,000 ppm. Targeted data dependent MS2 (normalized collision energy 13 V) was performed on any signal within 10 ppm of m/z 161.0445 (calculated exact mass of deprotonated levoglucosan and its isomers) or m/z 168.0884 (calculated exact mass of deprotonated dLVG) with an isolation window of 0.4 m/z. The detection limit was 2.5 pg on column, based on injections of 0.5 to 5000 pg on column of authentic standards of LVG, MAN, and GAL (Santa Cruz Biotechnology) and dLVG. Integrations were performed on mass chromatograms within 3 ppm mass accuracy and corrected for relative response factors to dLVG (1.08 ± 0.10, 0.76 ± 0.10 and 0.24 ± 0.05 for LVG, MAN, and GAL, respectively), according to known authentic standard mixes injected before and after every measurement sequence and supported by characteristic isomer-specific MS² data. All samples were corrected by subtracting the maximum MA concentrations in the blank duplicates of each ASE sequence. To account for biases due to sediment properties and sedimentation rates, MA influxes (mass accumulation rates in ng cm-2 yr-1) were calculated by multiplying the concentrations (ng g-1) with the sample-specific dry bulk densities (Melles et al., 2007;Wennrich et al., 2016), and the sample's sedimentation rates (cm yr-1) using the age-depth models presented by Nowaczyk et al. (2013) for the the PG1351 and the ICDP-5011-1 cores.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lefrancq, Coline; Hawkes, Jason D.;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | ASIA (609823)

    This table contains the quantities of each pottery class at each site identified during archaeological surveys in Vidarbha, Maharashtra, India. The data is arranged according to the archaeological sites. For each site, the number of sherds and the MNI count are presented.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    García-Diego, Fernando-Juan; Zarzo, Manuel; Ramírez, Sandra; Perles, Angel;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | CollectionCare (814624)

    This data set contains relative humidity measurements obtained with sensors installed in the apse vault of the Cathedral of Valencia in Spain. The interest of these sensors is to monitor the conservation conditions of Renaissance frescoes. Included files are: Cathedral_of_Valencia_RH_2008.csv : Relative humidity measurements for the year 2008 Cathedral_of_Valencia_RH_2010.csv : Relative humidity measurements for the year 2010

  • Research data . Other dataset type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sluijs, Appy;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: EC | SPANC (771497)

    * These data represent: Raw data presented in Sluijs et al., 2020 (Climate of the Past)- Peak areas of GDGTs and GMGTs peaks across the late Paleocene - early Eocene of Hole 4 of the Arctic Coring EXpecition (ACEX).- Abundances of isoGDGTs and and chrenarchaeol in the modern peat dataset.* whereThe data were generated on sediment samples taken from drill cores retreived from Lomonosov Ridge, Arctic Ocean, 2004 by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, stored in the Bremen Core Repository. For the present paper, we analyzed organic lipid extracts previously documented by Sluijs et al., (2006; 2008; 2009) using the current methodological standards.* when and howThe lipid extracts were analyzed in 2018 in the organic geochemical laboratory at Utrecht University using Ultra High Performance liquid chromatography and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry using an Agilent 1260 Infinity series HPLC system coupled to an Agilent 6130 single-quadrupole mass spectrometer (methods follow Hopmans et al., 2016)* whyWe re-analyzed the extracts because analytical methodology has improved since the generation of the original datasets and because the dataset from the Arctic is crucial for Paleocene-Eocene climatology.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rossi, Matteo; Gittins, Mark; Mercuri, Giulia; Perles, Angel; Peiró, Andrea;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | CollectionCare (814624)

    This dataset contains environmental data (temperature, relative humidity, and, in some cases, light and ultraviolet radiation levels) of partner museums of the European Horizon 2020 CollectionCare project . The following museums provided data to create this compilation and consolidation: Alava Arms Museum (Spain), Alava Fine Arts Museum (Spain), National Historical Museum (Greece), The Ethnographic Open Air Museum of Latvia, The Royal Danish Collection - Rosenborg (Denmark).

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Burgay, Francois; Spolaor, Andrea; Gabrieli, Jacopo; Cozzi, Giulio; Turetta, Clara; Vallelonga, Paul T; Barbante, Carlo;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: EC | PAST4FUTURE (243908)

    In this dataset, we present Fe, Na and Ca concentration and fluxes retrieved from the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM) ice core project, covering the last 108 kyrs. The sampling resolution was 110 cm. To ensure an effective dissolution of Fe particles, samples were acidified to pH 1 using Suprapure nitric acid and stored at room temperature for 1 month before the analysis. The ice samples were analyzed with an Inductively Coupled Plasma Single Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer equipped with a quartz Scott spray chamber. Limits of Detection, calculated as three times the standard deviation of the blanks, were 0.8 µg L-1 for 57Fe, 1 µg L-1 for Ca and 3 µg L-1 for Na. Our results show that Holocene Fe fluxes (0.042 -11.7 kyr b2k, 0.5 mg m-2 yr-1) at the NEEM site were four times lower than the average recorded over the last glacial period (11.7– 108 kyr b2k, 2.0 mg m-2 yr-1), while they were greater during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 14.5 – 26.5 kyr b2k, 3.6 mg m-2 yr-1) and Marine Isotope Stage 4 (MIS 4, 60 - 71 kyr b2k, 5.8 mg m-2 yr-1). We present Fe, Ca and Na concentration and fluxes. Dating (GICC05modelext-NEEM-1) and accumulation data are from Rasmussen et al., 2013.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Beddow, Helen M; Liebrand, Diederik; Wilson, Douglas S; Hilgen, Frederik J; Sluijs, Appy; Wade, Bridget S; Lourens, Lucas Joost;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: EC | EARTHSEQUENCING (617462), EC | ERAS (293741), NWO | Evolution of astronomical... (2300157723)

    Astronomical tuning of sediment sequences requires both unambiguous cycle-pattern recognition in climate proxy records and astronomical solutions, and independent information about the phase relationship between these two. Here we present two different astronomically tuned age models for the Oligocene-Miocene Transition (OMT) from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site U1334 (equatorial Pacific Ocean) to assess the effect tuning has on astronomically calibrated ages and the geologic time scale. These alternative age models (from ~22 to ~24 Ma) are based on different tunings between proxy records and eccentricity: the first age model is based on an aligning CaCO3 weight (wt%) to Earth's orbital eccentricity, the second age model is based on a direct age calibration of benthic foraminiferal stable carbon isotope ratios (d13C) to eccentricity. To independently test which tuned age model and associated tuning assumptions is in best agreement with independent ages based on tectonic plate-pair spreading rates, we assign our tuned ages to the magnetostratigraphic reversals identified in deep-marine magnetic anomaly profiles. Subsequently, we compute tectonic plate-pair spreading rates based on the tuned ages. The resultant, alternative spreading rate histories indicate that the CaCO3 tuned age model is most consistent with a conservative assumption of constant, or linearly changing, spreading rates. The CaCO3 tuned age model thus provides robust ages and durations for polarity chrons C6Bn.1n-C6Cn.1r, which are not based on astronomical tuning in the latest iteration of the Geologic Time Scale. Furthermore, it provides independent evidence that the relatively large (several 10,000 years) time lags documented in the benthic foraminiferal isotope records relative to orbital eccentricity, constitute a real feature of the Oligocene-Miocene climate system and carbon cycle. The age constraints from Site U1334 thus provide independent evidence that the delayed responses of the Oligocene-Miocene climate-cryosphere system and carbon cycle resulted from highly nonlinear feedbacks to astronomical forcing.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rasmussen, Sune Olander; Abbott, Peter M; Blunier, Thomas; Bourne, Mark; Brook, Edward J; Buchardt, Susanne L; Buizert, Christo; Chappellaz, Jérôme A; Clausen, Henrik Brink; Cook, Eliza; +14 more
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: EC | PAST4FUTURE (243908), EC | TRACE (259253)

    A stratigraphy-based chronology for the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM) ice core has been derived by transferring the annual layer counted Greenland Ice Core Chronology 2005 (GICC05) and its model extension (GICC05modelext) from the NGRIP core to the NEEM core using 787 match points of mainly volcanic origin identified in the electrical conductivity measurement (ECM) and dielectrical profiling (DEP) records. Tephra horizons found in both the NEEM and NGRIP ice cores are used to test the matching based on ECM and DEP and provide five additional horizons used for the timescale transfer. A thinning function reflecting the accumulated strain along the core has been determined using a Dansgaard-Johnsen flow model and an isotope-dependent accumulation rate parameterization. Flow parameters are determined from Monte Carlo analysis constrained by the observed depth-age horizons. In order to construct a chronology for the gas phase, the ice age-gas age difference (Delta age) has been reconstructed using a coupled firn densification-heat diffusion model. Temperature and accumulation inputs to the Delta age model, initially derived from the water isotope proxies, have been adjusted to optimize the fit to timing constraints from d15N of nitrogen and high-resolution methane data during the abrupt onset of Greenland interstadials. The ice and gas chronologies and the corresponding thinning function represent the first chronology for the NEEM core, named GICC05modelext-NEEM-1. Based on both the flow and firn modelling results, the accumulation history for the NEEM site has been reconstructed. Together, the timescale and accumulation reconstruction provide the necessary basis for further analysis of the records from NEEM.

Advanced search in Research products
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Include:
The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
107 Research products, page 1 of 11
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gómez-Letona, Markel; Arístegui, Javier; Hernández-Hernández, Nauzet; Pérez-Lorenzo, Maria; Alvarez-Salgado, Xose Anton; Teira, Eva; Sebastian, Marta;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: EC | SUMMER (817806)

    This dataset contains the results of the characterisation of the prokaryotic community by flow cytometry and tritiated leucine incorporation from the MAFIA cruise (Migrants and Active Flux In the Atlantic ocean). Samples were collected in the tropical and subtropical Atlantic during the MAFIA cruise (April 2015) on board the BIO Hespérides. Seawater samples were collected at 13 stations (from the Brazilian coast to the Canary Islands), from the surface down to 3500 m, using a General Oceanics oceanographic rosette equipped with 24 l PVC Niskin bottles. Abundance and cell characteristics (high nucleic acid content fraction, cell volume, viability) were based on measurements performed with a FACSCalibur (Becton-Dickinson) flow cytometer. Leucine incorporation rates were estimated with tritiated leucine (Kirchman et al. 1985) using centrifugation and filtration methods (Smith and Azam 1992). Integrated or average values of variables were estimated for the epipelagic (0-200 m), mesopelagic (200-1000 m) and bathypelagic (1000-3000 m) layers, based on an interpolated grid estimated with DIVA. The aim of this dataset was to estimate the influence of surface productivity on the standing stock, characteristics and activity (as leucine incorporation) of prokaryotes across the water column.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Vahlenkamp, Maximilian; De Vleeschouwer, David; Batenburg, Sietske J; Edgar, Kirsty M; Hanson, C E; Martinez, Mathieu; Pälike, Heiko; MacLeod, Kenneth G; Li, Yong-Xiang; Richter, Carl; +4 more
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: EC | EARTHSEQUENCING (617462), NSF | Management and Operations... (1326927), UKRI | Exploring the roles of oc... (NE/R012350/1)

    The geologic time scale for the Cenozoic Era has been notably improved over the last decades by virtue of integrated stratigraphy, combining high-resolution astrochronologies, biostratigraphy and magnetostratigraphy with high-precision radioisotopic dates. However, the middle Eocene remains a weak link. The so-called "Eocene time scale gap" reflects the scarcity of suitable study sections with clear astronomically-forced variations in carbonate content, primarily because large parts of the oceans were starved of carbonate during the Eocene greenhouse. International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 369 cored a carbonate-rich sedimentary sequence of Eocene age in the Mentelle Basin (Site U1514, offshore southwest Australia). The sequence consists of nannofossil chalk and exhibits rhythmic clay content variability. Here, we show that IODP Site U1514 allows for the extraction of an astronomical signal and the construction of an Eocene astrochronology, using 3-cm resolution X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) core scans. The XRF-derived ratio between calcium and iron content (Ca/Fe) tracks the lithologic variability and serves as the basis for our U1514 astrochronology. We present a 16 million-year-long (40-56 Ma) nearly continuous history of Eocene sedimentation with variations paced by eccentricity and obliquity. We supplement the high-resolution XRF data with low-resolution bulk carbon and oxygen isotopes, recording the long-term cooling trend from the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM - ca. 56 Ma) into the middle Eocene (ca. 40 Ma). Our early Eocene astrochronology corroborates existing chronologies based on deep-sea sites and Italian land sections. For the middle Eocene, the sedimentological record at U1514 provides a single-site geochemical backbone and thus offers a further step towards a fully integrated Cenozoic geologic time scale at orbital resolution.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dietze, Elisabeth; Karger, Cornelia; Mangelsdorf, Kai;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: EC | GlacialLegacy (772852)

    We freeze-dried and homogenized 44 samples of c. 0.7-1.8 g dry sediment from core PG1351 covering late glacials and interglacials of MIS 8 to MIS 5e, integrating sediment of 1 cm core depth. Temporal resolution of these samples ranges from 140 to 960 years per sample. For the period between 430 and 405 kyrs ago (end of MIS 12 to MIS 11c), 13 samples of 0.5-1.3 g of dry sediment from ICDP core 5011-1 were taken for MA analyses, integrating sediment of 2 cm core depth. Eight of these 13 samples are from the same core depths as were previously analysed for pollen (Melles et al., 2012). Temporal resolution of these samples varies between 200 and 970 years per sample comparable to core PG1351. Across all samples, temporal resolution is 333 ± 273 years per sample, giving centennial- to millennial scale averages. We extracted the polar lipids of all MA samples using a Dionex Accelerated Solvent Extraction system (ASE 350, ThermoFisher Scientific) at 100°C, 103 bar pressure and two extraction cycles (20 min static time) with 100 % methanol, after an ASE cycle with 100 % dichloromethane. For every sample sequence (n=13-18), we extracted a blank ASE cell and included it in all further steps. We added 60 ng of deuterated levoglucosan (C6H3D7O5; dLVG; Th. Geyer GmbH & Co. KG) as internal standard, and filtered the extract over a PTFE filter using acetonitrile and 5 % HPLC-grade water. We analysed the extracts with an Ultimate 3000 RS ultra-high performance liquid chromatograph (U-HPLC) with thermostated autosampler and column oven coupled to a Q Exactive Plus Orbitrap mass spectrometer (Quadrupole-Orbitrap MS; ThermoFisher Scientific) with heated electrospray injection (HESI) probe at GFZ Potsdam, using measurement conditions adapted from earlier studies (Hopmans et al., 2013;Schreuder et al., 2018;Dietze et al., 2019). Briefly, separation was achieved on two Xbridge BEH amide columns in series (2.1 x 150 mm, 3.5 um particle size) fitted with a 50 mm pre-column of the same material (Waters). The compounds were eluted (flow rate 0.2 mL min-1) with 100 % A for 15 minutes, followed by column cleaning with 100 % B for 15 min, and re-equilibration to starting conditions for 25 min. Eluent A was acetonitrile:water:triethylamine (92.5:7.5:0.01) and eluent B acetonitrile:water:triethylamine (70:30:0.01). HESI settings were as follows: sheath gas (N2) pressure 20 (arbitrary units), auxiliary gas (N2) pressure 3 (arbitrary units), auxiliary gas (N2) temperature of 50 ˚C, spray voltage -2.9 kV (negative ion mode), capillary temperature 300 °C, S-Lens 50 V. Detection was achieved by monitoring m/z 150-200 with a resolution of 280,000 ppm. Targeted data dependent MS2 (normalized collision energy 13 V) was performed on any signal within 10 ppm of m/z 161.0445 (calculated exact mass of deprotonated levoglucosan and its isomers) or m/z 168.0884 (calculated exact mass of deprotonated dLVG) with an isolation window of 0.4 m/z. The detection limit was 2.5 pg on column, based on injections of 0.5 to 5000 pg on column of authentic standards of LVG, MAN, and GAL (Santa Cruz Biotechnology) and dLVG. Integrations were performed on mass chromatograms within 3 ppm mass accuracy and corrected for relative response factors to dLVG (1.08 ± 0.10, 0.76 ± 0.10 and 0.24 ± 0.05 for LVG, MAN, and GAL, respectively), according to known authentic standard mixes injected before and after every measurement sequence and supported by characteristic isomer-specific MS² data. All samples were corrected by subtracting the maximum MA concentrations in the blank duplicates of each ASE sequence. To account for biases due to sediment properties and sedimentation rates, MA influxes (mass accumulation rates in ng cm-2 yr-1) were calculated by multiplying the concentrations (ng g-1) with the sample-specific dry bulk densities (Melles et al., 2007;Wennrich et al., 2016), and the sample's sedimentation rates (cm yr-1) using the age-depth models presented by Nowaczyk et al. (2013) for the the PG1351 and the ICDP-5011-1 cores.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lefrancq, Coline; Hawkes, Jason D.;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | ASIA (609823)

    This table contains the quantities of each pottery class at each site identified during archaeological surveys in Vidarbha, Maharashtra, India. The data is arranged according to the archaeological sites. For each site, the number of sherds and the MNI count are presented.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    García-Diego, Fernando-Juan; Zarzo, Manuel; Ramírez, Sandra; Perles, Angel;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | CollectionCare (814624)

    This data set contains relative humidity measurements obtained with sensors installed in the apse vault of the Cathedral of Valencia in Spain. The interest of these sensors is to monitor the conservation conditions of Renaissance frescoes. Included files are: Cathedral_of_Valencia_RH_2008.csv : Relative humidity measurements for the year 2008 Cathedral_of_Valencia_RH_2010.csv : Relative humidity measurements for the year 2010

  • Research data . Other dataset type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sluijs, Appy;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: EC | SPANC (771497)

    * These data represent: Raw data presented in Sluijs et al., 2020 (Climate of the Past)- Peak areas of GDGTs and GMGTs peaks across the late Paleocene - early Eocene of Hole 4 of the Arctic Coring EXpecition (ACEX).- Abundances of isoGDGTs and and chrenarchaeol in the modern peat dataset.* whereThe data were generated on sediment samples taken from drill cores retreived from Lomonosov Ridge, Arctic Ocean, 2004 by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, stored in the Bremen Core Repository. For the present paper, we analyzed organic lipid extracts previously documented by Sluijs et al., (2006; 2008; 2009) using the current methodological standards.* when and howThe lipid extracts were analyzed in 2018 in the organic geochemical laboratory at Utrecht University using Ultra High Performance liquid chromatography and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry using an Agilent 1260 Infinity series HPLC system coupled to an Agilent 6130 single-quadrupole mass spectrometer (methods follow Hopmans et al., 2016)* whyWe re-analyzed the extracts because analytical methodology has improved since the generation of the original datasets and because the dataset from the Arctic is crucial for Paleocene-Eocene climatology.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rossi, Matteo; Gittins, Mark; Mercuri, Giulia; Perles, Angel; Peiró, Andrea;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | CollectionCare (814624)

    This dataset contains environmental data (temperature, relative humidity, and, in some cases, light and ultraviolet radiation levels) of partner museums of the European Horizon 2020 CollectionCare project . The following museums provided data to create this compilation and consolidation: Alava Arms Museum (Spain), Alava Fine Arts Museum (Spain), National Historical Museum (Greece), The Ethnographic Open Air Museum of Latvia, The Royal Danish Collection - Rosenborg (Denmark).

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Burgay, Francois; Spolaor, Andrea; Gabrieli, Jacopo; Cozzi, Giulio; Turetta, Clara; Vallelonga, Paul T; Barbante, Carlo;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: EC | PAST4FUTURE (243908)

    In this dataset, we present Fe, Na and Ca concentration and fluxes retrieved from the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM) ice core project, covering the last 108 kyrs. The sampling resolution was 110 cm. To ensure an effective dissolution of Fe particles, samples were acidified to pH 1 using Suprapure nitric acid and stored at room temperature for 1 month before the analysis. The ice samples were analyzed with an Inductively Coupled Plasma Single Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer equipped with a quartz Scott spray chamber. Limits of Detection, calculated as three times the standard deviation of the blanks, were 0.8 µg L-1 for 57Fe, 1 µg L-1 for Ca and 3 µg L-1 for Na. Our results show that Holocene Fe fluxes (0.042 -11.7 kyr b2k, 0.5 mg m-2 yr-1) at the NEEM site were four times lower than the average recorded over the last glacial period (11.7– 108 kyr b2k, 2.0 mg m-2 yr-1), while they were greater during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 14.5 – 26.5 kyr b2k, 3.6 mg m-2 yr-1) and Marine Isotope Stage 4 (MIS 4, 60 - 71 kyr b2k, 5.8 mg m-2 yr-1). We present Fe, Ca and Na concentration and fluxes. Dating (GICC05modelext-NEEM-1) and accumulation data are from Rasmussen et al., 2013.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Beddow, Helen M; Liebrand, Diederik; Wilson, Douglas S; Hilgen, Frederik J; Sluijs, Appy; Wade, Bridget S; Lourens, Lucas Joost;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: EC | EARTHSEQUENCING (617462), EC | ERAS (293741), NWO | Evolution of astronomical... (2300157723)

    Astronomical tuning of sediment sequences requires both unambiguous cycle-pattern recognition in climate proxy records and astronomical solutions, and independent information about the phase relationship between these two. Here we present two different astronomically tuned age models for the Oligocene-Miocene Transition (OMT) from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site U1334 (equatorial Pacific Ocean) to assess the effect tuning has on astronomically calibrated ages and the geologic time scale. These alternative age models (from ~22 to ~24 Ma) are based on different tunings between proxy records and eccentricity: the first age model is based on an aligning CaCO3 weight (wt%) to Earth's orbital eccentricity, the second age model is based on a direct age calibration of benthic foraminiferal stable carbon isotope ratios (d13C) to eccentricity. To independently test which tuned age model and associated tuning assumptions is in best agreement with independent ages based on tectonic plate-pair spreading rates, we assign our tuned ages to the magnetostratigraphic reversals identified in deep-marine magnetic anomaly profiles. Subsequently, we compute tectonic plate-pair spreading rates based on the tuned ages. The resultant, alternative spreading rate histories indicate that the CaCO3 tuned age model is most consistent with a conservative assumption of constant, or linearly changing, spreading rates. The CaCO3 tuned age model thus provides robust ages and durations for polarity chrons C6Bn.1n-C6Cn.1r, which are not based on astronomical tuning in the latest iteration of the Geologic Time Scale. Furthermore, it provides independent evidence that the relatively large (several 10,000 years) time lags documented in the benthic foraminiferal isotope records relative to orbital eccentricity, constitute a real feature of the Oligocene-Miocene climate system and carbon cycle. The age constraints from Site U1334 thus provide independent evidence that the delayed responses of the Oligocene-Miocene climate-cryosphere system and carbon cycle resulted from highly nonlinear feedbacks to astronomical forcing.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rasmussen, Sune Olander; Abbott, Peter M; Blunier, Thomas; Bourne, Mark; Brook, Edward J; Buchardt, Susanne L; Buizert, Christo; Chappellaz, Jérôme A; Clausen, Henrik Brink; Cook, Eliza; +14 more
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: EC | PAST4FUTURE (243908), EC | TRACE (259253)

    A stratigraphy-based chronology for the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM) ice core has been derived by transferring the annual layer counted Greenland Ice Core Chronology 2005 (GICC05) and its model extension (GICC05modelext) from the NGRIP core to the NEEM core using 787 match points of mainly volcanic origin identified in the electrical conductivity measurement (ECM) and dielectrical profiling (DEP) records. Tephra horizons found in both the NEEM and NGRIP ice cores are used to test the matching based on ECM and DEP and provide five additional horizons used for the timescale transfer. A thinning function reflecting the accumulated strain along the core has been determined using a Dansgaard-Johnsen flow model and an isotope-dependent accumulation rate parameterization. Flow parameters are determined from Monte Carlo analysis constrained by the observed depth-age horizons. In order to construct a chronology for the gas phase, the ice age-gas age difference (Delta age) has been reconstructed using a coupled firn densification-heat diffusion model. Temperature and accumulation inputs to the Delta age model, initially derived from the water isotope proxies, have been adjusted to optimize the fit to timing constraints from d15N of nitrogen and high-resolution methane data during the abrupt onset of Greenland interstadials. The ice and gas chronologies and the corresponding thinning function represent the first chronology for the NEEM core, named GICC05modelext-NEEM-1. Based on both the flow and firn modelling results, the accumulation history for the NEEM site has been reconstructed. Together, the timescale and accumulation reconstruction provide the necessary basis for further analysis of the records from NEEM.