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201 Research products, page 1 of 21

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
  • Publications
  • 2018-2022
  • English
  • Publikationer från Umeå universitet
  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage

10
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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Johannes Edvardsson; Anton Hansson; Mattias Sjölander; Johan von Boer; Philip Buckland; Hans Linderson; Björn Gunnarson; Hans W Linderholm; Igor Drobyshev; Dan Hammarlund;
    Publisher: Umeå universitet, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet
    Country: Sweden

    Abstract The Old Wood in a New Light database project focuses on the digitization and accessibility of the results of dendrochronological samples analyzed and archived at four Swedish university-based tree-ring laboratories at Lund University, Stockholm University, University of Gothenburg, and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. Collaboration with the Environmental Archaeology Laboratory and Humlab at Umeå University enables long-term open access to data, raw data, and metadata. In this project, we (1) systematically undertake large-scale entry and open access publication of results from wood samples scientifically analyzed and archived by Swedish laboratories and the associated metadata, into the Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database (SEAD; www.sead.se) research data infrastructure, and (2) actively promote the database as a resource for new and ongoing interdisciplinary research initiatives. Including dendrochronological data in SEAD infrastructure allows interdisciplinary studies that combine major scientific and societal questions. Building on a pilot study of construction timber from southern Sweden and adaptation of SEAD digitization workflows, more than 70 000 samples archived at the four dendrochronological laboratories are now being handled in the project. The broad coverage of research networks, stakeholder interaction, and strategic support from the cultural heritage community is guaranteed owing to the ongoing collaboration between laboratories and an established international and multidisciplinary reference group.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Anne Gustavsson;
    Publisher: Umeå universitet, Institutionen för kultur- och medievetenskaper
    Country: Sweden

    In this article, I discuss the benefits and shortcomings of deploying an ethnographic approach when studying the digital return of visual collections from ethnographic museums to source communities. I draw on my research process and field work in the Argentine Chaco where I presented and discussed a selection of century-old ethnographic photographic and filmic images from this region with members of the Indigenous Pilagá People. I argue that carrying out extensive ethnographic field work is a way to access the density and multiple layers of social and cultural relations in which returns are carried out. I also discuss and analyze the effects of ethnography on contemporary field work. I specifically reflect upon my own ethnographic praxis from a historical perspective, as part of a longer tradition in which various generations of anthropologists have visited and revisited the Pilagá in the Argentine Chaco. I argue that this historical ”ethnographization” has left marks in the memories of key informants and in local notions of ”culture”. Thus not only are we to reframe our field methods by considering updated and critical literature on the subject but also by paying attention to the field´s own specific historical relationship with ethnography.

  • Publication . Article . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Marie Burgess;
    Publisher: Umeå universitet, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik
    Country: Sweden

    When I was about five years old, I used to watch movies with my father in our basement. I would sit on his lap while he smoked a cigar and we would watch John Wayne or some other manly person. I still believe that cigar smoke carries the most comforting smell in the world. We would talk through the movies, but for years, I could not remember a single word that passed between us on those nights. I was convinced my father had told me something that proved to be foundational, that helped form the person that I am. I never asked my father because I was afraid he would tell me that I made it all up. This is not a scene that I am willing to sacrifice. I will not risk having to cut it from the movie reel of my memory. I believe that the scenes that constitute my reality are transgenerational. When I think of those moments that I know have a central and permanent place in my memory, those moments that seem most real to me, those moments that I use to tell me who I am, I see that they are family mythologies, scenes that come through from the past. The memories that make me Christine Anne Taylor are not necessarily my own in the strict sense, but rather memories inherited, or maybe stolen, from family members who died long before I was born. If you asked me to narrate the events of last Monday, we would be in for a snooze. I would look at my date book and read, "Drop off book for L before 6:00." I can tell you I probably went to the library, read some books, made some photocopies, drank four cups of tea, and smoked three cigarettes. We choose the days we want to remember, the days we want to see as foundational, by narrating them. Memory and narrative are one. Narrative is communication. Thus, memory can be communicated, passed between generations, and I can begin at the beginning. It is just after one o'clock in the morning on January 31, 1981, in St. Paul, Minnesota. I am hurtling down Interstate 35E with my parents in a Pontiac Bonneville. My father, in the front seat, has vomit on his sweater, and my mother, in the backseat, is hoping that I will please not come out of her birth canal just yet. She has been in labor for hours, but only realized it twenty minutes ago, when her water broke. Her sister Susan likes to tell this story to emphasize how spacey my mom is. I prefer to think it makes her look tough. Dad thanks Mom for her confusion to this day, as it allowed him to stay at the bar until last call. To Dad's credit, when Dwayne the bartender picked up the phone behind the counter and relayed the message, he didn't stay to finish that last drink. No, he jumped right in the Bonneville, zipped up Dale Street, and grabbed my mom, who promptly puked on him. Knowing how finicky he was about his clothes, she apologized. They then sped down Larpenteur Avenue and onto 35E, where we first saw them. By this point, my mom is pretty sure that my head is actually coming out. She doesn't want to have a baby in a Bonneville. In fact, she isn't sure if she wants to have a baby at all. Six days ago, she packed up a suitcase, drove to Hudson, Wisconsin, and checked into a Motel 6. But she came back two hours later. She is twenty-three years old and she is married to a man who is twenty years her senior. She is having a baby in a car with velour seats, and she is a little freaked out. However, she is not as freaked out as the sixteen-year-old girl who gets pulled out of a birthing room to make way for the two of us when we finally arrive at the hospital. The nurses think the girl has more time than my mom, but they are wrong: she ends up having her baby in the hallway like some kind of twentieth-century Mary, Mother of God. My dad is standing around in a ripped operating gown, because the largest available size does not fit across his shoulders. The medical resident who delivers me calls him the Incredible Hulk. I have arrived. Two months later, just before my first Easter, we three find ourselves back at Ramsey County Hospital. …

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Elin Manker;
    Publisher: Umeå universitet, Institutionen för kultur- och medievetenskaper
    Country: Sweden

    Illustrated price catalogues were published and distributed during the second half of the nineteenth century in every country that was affected by industrialization. The illustrations that were used in these catalogues intermingled with several contemporary image-systems; the centuries old practice of engraving, the relatively new practise of using photography, the illustrated publication, displays at world exhibitions and educational displays in public museums. The aim of this article is to investigate the circulation of knowledge that the photographs in the illustrated price catalogues took part in and to interrogate them as object photography. My journey includes three steps: early photography from the 1840s, the illustrated price catalogues of the 1880s, and contemporary antiques journals. This article discusses what knowledge was/is produced, maintained, transformed, and transferred by the use of object photography in these contexts. To this purpose, object photography is identified as a genre of images that generates knowledge that negotiates questions of time and historicity. I note that this is a quality that made object photography pertinent for nineteenth-century manufacturing and marketing and continues to be relevant for the historic revivalism and antiques business today.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Thomas Pettersson; Johan Jansson; Urban Lindgren;
    Publisher: Umeå universitet, Enheten för ekonomisk historia
    Country: Sweden

    We explore the decisions in Parliament about the Swedish tax deduction for commuting since the 1980s. The aim is to explain the continuity of the tax regulation despite several attempts from motions in Parliament and public investigations to reform it towards environmental goals, e.g., reduced emissions of CO2. When reforms have been proposed, the political majority in Parliament has regardless of political colour voted against and retreated to the original motives for the tax deduction; economic growth and the enlargement of regional labour markets. The interests of Swedish mass motorisation succeeded in finding the arguments to slow down reforms and at the same time reinforce the path dependency by adding new legitimacy to the regulation. If the attempts to reform the tax deduction had been part of a broader reform of the transport sector and the tax system, they might have succeeded in breaking with the old path.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Alf Arvidsson;
    Publisher: Umeå universitet, Institutionen för kultur- och medievetenskaper
    Country: Sweden

    The present article focuses on how storytelling events serve as a tool in reinforcing local identity. The case study presented here centres on Bjurholm, a small rural town in northern Sweden, where a local storytelling society called Bjurholms Berättarakademi has been emphasizing municipal community building as a singularly important task. Initially offering public storytelling evenings and festivals celebrating prominent local storytellers, it soon shifted strategy and instead concentrated on storytelling in schools and villages, by pupils and villagers, and addressing urgent local topics at special events. The tenuousness of relying on only a handful of activists and the problem of continuity has been countered through collaboration with other local societies, as well as by embracing new media.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Christine Hudson; Linda Sandberg; Kristin Sundström;
    Publisher: Umeå universitet, Statsvetenskapliga institutionen
    Country: Sweden

    In Sweden, integration is a pressing issue particularly following the large influx of immigrants in 2015. Swedish municipalities play an important role in civic integration, with responsibility for newly arrived immigrants receiving a basic understanding of Swedish society, their rights and obligations. We analyse data from 204 applications granted funding 2016/2017 for projects improving the integration of refugees into society by co-operation between municipalities and other actors. Using thematic analysis, we identify two broad themes. One concerning the ‘what’ of integration–the Swedish values, norms and behaviours that immigrants are expected to learn in order to become ‘good’ Swedish citizens, and the other concerning the means or the ‘how’ of integration. However, although these projects are well-meaning, they may have normalizing and disciplining effects whereby the immigrant is constructed as subordinate, as the Other. Swedish gender-equality is heavily emphasized and we see how, in relation to this, the immigrant is constructed as unmodern, bound by tradition and unequal. Particularly immigrant women are produced as passive objects rather than active subjects, in need of special women’s activities and lacking as parents in comparison with the Swedish ideal.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Annette Schophuus Jensen; Troels Højsgaard Jørgensen; Christina Christersson; Edit Nagy; Juha Sinisalo; Eva Furenäs; Ola Gjesdal; Peter Eriksson; Niels Vejlstrup; Bengt Johansson; +9 more
    Publisher: Uppsala universitet, Kardiologi
    Countries: Denmark, Finland, Sweden, Sweden

    Background Little is known about the cause of death (CoD) in patients with transposition of the great arteries palliated with a Mustard or Senning procedure. The aim was to describe the CoD for patients with the Mustard and Senning procedure during short‐ (<10 years), mid‐ (10–20 years), and long‐term (>20 years) follow‐up after the operation. Methods and Results This is a retrospective, descriptive multicenter cohort study including all Nordic patients (Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden) who underwent a Mustard or Senning procedure between 1967 and 2003. Patients who died within 30 days after the index operation were excluded. Among 968 patients with Mustard/Senning palliated transposition of the great arteries, 814 patients were eligible for the study, with a mean follow‐up of 33.6 years. The estimated risk of all‐cause mortality reached 36.0% after 43 years of follow‐up, and the risk of death was highest among male patients as compared with female patients ( P =0.004). The most common CoD was sudden cardiac death (SCD), followed by heart failure/heart transplantation accounting for 29% and 27%, respectively. During short‐, mid‐, and long‐term follow‐up, there was a change in CoD with SCD accounting for 23.7%, 46.6%, and 19.0% ( P =0.002) and heart failure/heart transplantation 18.6%, 22.4%, and 46.6% ( P =0.0005), respectively. Conclusions Among patients corrected with Mustard or Senning transposition of the great arteries, the most common CoD is SCD followed by heart failure/heart transplantation. The CoD changes as the patients age, with SCD as the most common cause in adolescence and heart failure as the dominant cause in adulthood. Furthermore, the risk of all‐cause mortality, SCD, and death attributable to heart failure or heart transplantation was increased in men >10 years after the Mustard/Senning operation.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Cristiano Vignola; Martina Hättestrand; Anton Bonnier; Martin Finné; Adam Izdebski; Christos Katrantsiotis; Katerina Kouli; Georgios C. Liakopoulos; Elin Norström; Maria Papadaki; +3 more
    Countries: United Kingdom, Sweden

    This study provides a high-resolution reconstruction of the vegetation of the Argive Plain (Peloponnese, Greece) covering 5000 years from the Early Bronze Age onwards. The well dated pollen record from ancient Lake Lerna has been interpreted in the light of archaeological and historical sources, climatic data from the same core and other regional proxies. Our results demonstrate a significant degree of human impact on the environments of the Argive Plain throughout the study period. During the Early Bronze Age evidence of a thermophilous vegetation is seen in the pollen record, representing the mixed deciduous oak woodland of the Peloponnesian uplands. The plain was mainly used for the cultivation of cereals, whereas local fen conditions prevailed at the coring site. Towards the end of this period an increasing water table is recorded and the fen turns into a lake, despite more arid conditions. In the Late Bronze Age, the presence of important palatial centres modified the landscape resulting in decrease of mixed deciduous oak woodland and increase in open land, partly used for grazing. Possibly, the human management produced a permanent hydrological change at Lake Lerna. From the Archaic period onwards the increasing human pressure in association with local drier conditions caused landscape instability, as attested by a dramatic alluvial event recorded in the Pinus curve at the end of the Hellenistic Age. Wet conditions coincided with Roman times and favoured a forest regeneration pattern in the area, at the same time as we see the most intensive olive cultivation in the pollen record. The establishment of an economic landscape primarily based on pastures is recorded in the Byzantine period and continues until modern times. Overgrazing and fires in combination with arid conditions likely caused degradation of the vegetation into garrigue, as seen in the area of the Argive Plain today. Introduction Study area - Geomorphology and hydrology of the Argive Plain - Vegetation - Climate - Human occupation Materials and methods - Sediment sequence and age-depth model - Pollen analysis Results - LPAZ 1: 486–202 cm, ca. 4760–2240 BP (2810–290 BCE) - LPAZ 2: 203–42 cm, ca. 2240–270 BP (290 BCE-1680 CE) - LPAZ 3: 41–0 cm, ca. 270 BP-present Interpretation and discussion - The Early Bronze Age (5150–4000 BP) - The Middle and Late Bronze Age (4000–3150 BP) - The end of the Late Bronze Age and the Early Iron Age (3150–2650 BP) - Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic period (2650–2096 BP) - The Roman period (2096–1620 BP) - Byzantine and Medieval period (1620–487 BP) - Ottoman and modern Greek period (487 BP-present) Conclusions

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Anna Baranowska-Rataj; Kieron Barclay; Joan Costa-Font; Mikko Myrskylä; Berkay Özcan;
    Publisher: Umeå universitet, Sociologiska institutionen
    Country: Sweden

    Although preterm birth is the leading cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality in advanced economies, evidence about the consequences of prematurity in later life is limited. Using Swedish registers for cohorts born 1982–94 (N = 1,087,750), we examine the effects of preterm birth on school grades at age 16 using sibling fixed effects models. We further examine how school grades are affected by degree of prematurity and the compensating roles of family socio-economic resources and characteristics of school districts. Our results show that the negative effects of preterm birth are observed mostly among children born extremely preterm (<28 weeks); children born moderately preterm (32–<37 weeks) suffer no ill effects. We do not find any evidence for a moderating effect of parental socio-economic resources. Children born extremely preterm and in the top decile of school districts achieve as good grades as children born at full term in an average school district.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
201 Research products, page 1 of 21
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Johannes Edvardsson; Anton Hansson; Mattias Sjölander; Johan von Boer; Philip Buckland; Hans Linderson; Björn Gunnarson; Hans W Linderholm; Igor Drobyshev; Dan Hammarlund;
    Publisher: Umeå universitet, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet
    Country: Sweden

    Abstract The Old Wood in a New Light database project focuses on the digitization and accessibility of the results of dendrochronological samples analyzed and archived at four Swedish university-based tree-ring laboratories at Lund University, Stockholm University, University of Gothenburg, and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. Collaboration with the Environmental Archaeology Laboratory and Humlab at Umeå University enables long-term open access to data, raw data, and metadata. In this project, we (1) systematically undertake large-scale entry and open access publication of results from wood samples scientifically analyzed and archived by Swedish laboratories and the associated metadata, into the Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database (SEAD; www.sead.se) research data infrastructure, and (2) actively promote the database as a resource for new and ongoing interdisciplinary research initiatives. Including dendrochronological data in SEAD infrastructure allows interdisciplinary studies that combine major scientific and societal questions. Building on a pilot study of construction timber from southern Sweden and adaptation of SEAD digitization workflows, more than 70 000 samples archived at the four dendrochronological laboratories are now being handled in the project. The broad coverage of research networks, stakeholder interaction, and strategic support from the cultural heritage community is guaranteed owing to the ongoing collaboration between laboratories and an established international and multidisciplinary reference group.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Anne Gustavsson;
    Publisher: Umeå universitet, Institutionen för kultur- och medievetenskaper
    Country: Sweden

    In this article, I discuss the benefits and shortcomings of deploying an ethnographic approach when studying the digital return of visual collections from ethnographic museums to source communities. I draw on my research process and field work in the Argentine Chaco where I presented and discussed a selection of century-old ethnographic photographic and filmic images from this region with members of the Indigenous Pilagá People. I argue that carrying out extensive ethnographic field work is a way to access the density and multiple layers of social and cultural relations in which returns are carried out. I also discuss and analyze the effects of ethnography on contemporary field work. I specifically reflect upon my own ethnographic praxis from a historical perspective, as part of a longer tradition in which various generations of anthropologists have visited and revisited the Pilagá in the Argentine Chaco. I argue that this historical ”ethnographization” has left marks in the memories of key informants and in local notions of ”culture”. Thus not only are we to reframe our field methods by considering updated and critical literature on the subject but also by paying attention to the field´s own specific historical relationship with ethnography.

  • Publication . Article . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Marie Burgess;
    Publisher: Umeå universitet, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik
    Country: Sweden

    When I was about five years old, I used to watch movies with my father in our basement. I would sit on his lap while he smoked a cigar and we would watch John Wayne or some other manly person. I still believe that cigar smoke carries the most comforting smell in the world. We would talk through the movies, but for years, I could not remember a single word that passed between us on those nights. I was convinced my father had told me something that proved to be foundational, that helped form the person that I am. I never asked my father because I was afraid he would tell me that I made it all up. This is not a scene that I am willing to sacrifice. I will not risk having to cut it from the movie reel of my memory. I believe that the scenes that constitute my reality are transgenerational. When I think of those moments that I know have a central and permanent place in my memory, those moments that seem most real to me, those moments that I use to tell me who I am, I see that they are family mythologies, scenes that come through from the past. The memories that make me Christine Anne Taylor are not necessarily my own in the strict sense, but rather memories inherited, or maybe stolen, from family members who died long before I was born. If you asked me to narrate the events of last Monday, we would be in for a snooze. I would look at my date book and read, "Drop off book for L before 6:00." I can tell you I probably went to the library, read some books, made some photocopies, drank four cups of tea, and smoked three cigarettes. We choose the days we want to remember, the days we want to see as foundational, by narrating them. Memory and narrative are one. Narrative is communication. Thus, memory can be communicated, passed between generations, and I can begin at the beginning. It is just after one o'clock in the morning on January 31, 1981, in St. Paul, Minnesota. I am hurtling down Interstate 35E with my parents in a Pontiac Bonneville. My father, in the front seat, has vomit on his sweater, and my mother, in the backseat, is hoping that I will please not come out of her birth canal just yet. She has been in labor for hours, but only realized it twenty minutes ago, when her water broke. Her sister Susan likes to tell this story to emphasize how spacey my mom is. I prefer to think it makes her look tough. Dad thanks Mom for her confusion to this day, as it allowed him to stay at the bar until last call. To Dad's credit, when Dwayne the bartender picked up the phone behind the counter and relayed the message, he didn't stay to finish that last drink. No, he jumped right in the Bonneville, zipped up Dale Street, and grabbed my mom, who promptly puked on him. Knowing how finicky he was about his clothes, she apologized. They then sped down Larpenteur Avenue and onto 35E, where we first saw them. By this point, my mom is pretty sure that my head is actually coming out. She doesn't want to have a baby in a Bonneville. In fact, she isn't sure if she wants to have a baby at all. Six days ago, she packed up a suitcase, drove to Hudson, Wisconsin, and checked into a Motel 6. But she came back two hours later. She is twenty-three years old and she is married to a man who is twenty years her senior. She is having a baby in a car with velour seats, and she is a little freaked out. However, she is not as freaked out as the sixteen-year-old girl who gets pulled out of a birthing room to make way for the two of us when we finally arrive at the hospital. The nurses think the girl has more time than my mom, but they are wrong: she ends up having her baby in the hallway like some kind of twentieth-century Mary, Mother of God. My dad is standing around in a ripped operating gown, because the largest available size does not fit across his shoulders. The medical resident who delivers me calls him the Incredible Hulk. I have arrived. Two months later, just before my first Easter, we three find ourselves back at Ramsey County Hospital. …

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Elin Manker;
    Publisher: Umeå universitet, Institutionen för kultur- och medievetenskaper
    Country: Sweden

    Illustrated price catalogues were published and distributed during the second half of the nineteenth century in every country that was affected by industrialization. The illustrations that were used in these catalogues intermingled with several contemporary image-systems; the centuries old practice of engraving, the relatively new practise of using photography, the illustrated publication, displays at world exhibitions and educational displays in public museums. The aim of this article is to investigate the circulation of knowledge that the photographs in the illustrated price catalogues took part in and to interrogate them as object photography. My journey includes three steps: early photography from the 1840s, the illustrated price catalogues of the 1880s, and contemporary antiques journals. This article discusses what knowledge was/is produced, maintained, transformed, and transferred by the use of object photography in these contexts. To this purpose, object photography is identified as a genre of images that generates knowledge that negotiates questions of time and historicity. I note that this is a quality that made object photography pertinent for nineteenth-century manufacturing and marketing and continues to be relevant for the historic revivalism and antiques business today.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Thomas Pettersson; Johan Jansson; Urban Lindgren;
    Publisher: Umeå universitet, Enheten för ekonomisk historia
    Country: Sweden

    We explore the decisions in Parliament about the Swedish tax deduction for commuting since the 1980s. The aim is to explain the continuity of the tax regulation despite several attempts from motions in Parliament and public investigations to reform it towards environmental goals, e.g., reduced emissions of CO2. When reforms have been proposed, the political majority in Parliament has regardless of political colour voted against and retreated to the original motives for the tax deduction; economic growth and the enlargement of regional labour markets. The interests of Swedish mass motorisation succeeded in finding the arguments to slow down reforms and at the same time reinforce the path dependency by adding new legitimacy to the regulation. If the attempts to reform the tax deduction had been part of a broader reform of the transport sector and the tax system, they might have succeeded in breaking with the old path.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Alf Arvidsson;
    Publisher: Umeå universitet, Institutionen för kultur- och medievetenskaper
    Country: Sweden

    The present article focuses on how storytelling events serve as a tool in reinforcing local identity. The case study presented here centres on Bjurholm, a small rural town in northern Sweden, where a local storytelling society called Bjurholms Berättarakademi has been emphasizing municipal community building as a singularly important task. Initially offering public storytelling evenings and festivals celebrating prominent local storytellers, it soon shifted strategy and instead concentrated on storytelling in schools and villages, by pupils and villagers, and addressing urgent local topics at special events. The tenuousness of relying on only a handful of activists and the problem of continuity has been countered through collaboration with other local societies, as well as by embracing new media.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Christine Hudson; Linda Sandberg; Kristin Sundström;
    Publisher: Umeå universitet, Statsvetenskapliga institutionen
    Country: Sweden

    In Sweden, integration is a pressing issue particularly following the large influx of immigrants in 2015. Swedish municipalities play an important role in civic integration, with responsibility for newly arrived immigrants receiving a basic understanding of Swedish society, their rights and obligations. We analyse data from 204 applications granted funding 2016/2017 for projects improving the integration of refugees into society by co-operation between municipalities and other actors. Using thematic analysis, we identify two broad themes. One concerning the ‘what’ of integration–the Swedish values, norms and behaviours that immigrants are expected to learn in order to become ‘good’ Swedish citizens, and the other concerning the means or the ‘how’ of integration. However, although these projects are well-meaning, they may have normalizing and disciplining effects whereby the immigrant is constructed as subordinate, as the Other. Swedish gender-equality is heavily emphasized and we see how, in relation to this, the immigrant is constructed as unmodern, bound by tradition and unequal. Particularly immigrant women are produced as passive objects rather than active subjects, in need of special women’s activities and lacking as parents in comparison with the Swedish ideal.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Annette Schophuus Jensen; Troels Højsgaard Jørgensen; Christina Christersson; Edit Nagy; Juha Sinisalo; Eva Furenäs; Ola Gjesdal; Peter Eriksson; Niels Vejlstrup; Bengt Johansson; +9 more
    Publisher: Uppsala universitet, Kardiologi
    Countries: Denmark, Finland, Sweden, Sweden

    Background Little is known about the cause of death (CoD) in patients with transposition of the great arteries palliated with a Mustard or Senning procedure. The aim was to describe the CoD for patients with the Mustard and Senning procedure during short‐ (<10 years), mid‐ (10–20 years), and long‐term (>20 years) follow‐up after the operation. Methods and Results This is a retrospective, descriptive multicenter cohort study including all Nordic patients (Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden) who underwent a Mustard or Senning procedure between 1967 and 2003. Patients who died within 30 days after the index operation were excluded. Among 968 patients with Mustard/Senning palliated transposition of the great arteries, 814 patients were eligible for the study, with a mean follow‐up of 33.6 years. The estimated risk of all‐cause mortality reached 36.0% after 43 years of follow‐up, and the risk of death was highest among male patients as compared with female patients ( P =0.004). The most common CoD was sudden cardiac death (SCD), followed by heart failure/heart transplantation accounting for 29% and 27%, respectively. During short‐, mid‐, and long‐term follow‐up, there was a change in CoD with SCD accounting for 23.7%, 46.6%, and 19.0% ( P =0.002) and heart failure/heart transplantation 18.6%, 22.4%, and 46.6% ( P =0.0005), respectively. Conclusions Among patients corrected with Mustard or Senning transposition of the great arteries, the most common CoD is SCD followed by heart failure/heart transplantation. The CoD changes as the patients age, with SCD as the most common cause in adolescence and heart failure as the dominant cause in adulthood. Furthermore, the risk of all‐cause mortality, SCD, and death attributable to heart failure or heart transplantation was increased in men >10 years after the Mustard/Senning operation.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Cristiano Vignola; Martina Hättestrand; Anton Bonnier; Martin Finné; Adam Izdebski; Christos Katrantsiotis; Katerina Kouli; Georgios C. Liakopoulos; Elin Norström; Maria Papadaki; +3 more
    Countries: United Kingdom, Sweden

    This study provides a high-resolution reconstruction of the vegetation of the Argive Plain (Peloponnese, Greece) covering 5000 years from the Early Bronze Age onwards. The well dated pollen record from ancient Lake Lerna has been interpreted in the light of archaeological and historical sources, climatic data from the same core and other regional proxies. Our results demonstrate a significant degree of human impact on the environments of the Argive Plain throughout the study period. During the Early Bronze Age evidence of a thermophilous vegetation is seen in the pollen record, representing the mixed deciduous oak woodland of the Peloponnesian uplands. The plain was mainly used for the cultivation of cereals, whereas local fen conditions prevailed at the coring site. Towards the end of this period an increasing water table is recorded and the fen turns into a lake, despite more arid conditions. In the Late Bronze Age, the presence of important palatial centres modified the landscape resulting in decrease of mixed deciduous oak woodland and increase in open land, partly used for grazing. Possibly, the human management produced a permanent hydrological change at Lake Lerna. From the Archaic period onwards the increasing human pressure in association with local drier conditions caused landscape instability, as attested by a dramatic alluvial event recorded in the Pinus curve at the end of the Hellenistic Age. Wet conditions coincided with Roman times and favoured a forest regeneration pattern in the area, at the same time as we see the most intensive olive cultivation in the pollen record. The establishment of an economic landscape primarily based on pastures is recorded in the Byzantine period and continues until modern times. Overgrazing and fires in combination with arid conditions likely caused degradation of the vegetation into garrigue, as seen in the area of the Argive Plain today. Introduction Study area - Geomorphology and hydrology of the Argive Plain - Vegetation - Climate - Human occupation Materials and methods - Sediment sequence and age-depth model - Pollen analysis Results - LPAZ 1: 486–202 cm, ca. 4760–2240 BP (2810–290 BCE) - LPAZ 2: 203–42 cm, ca. 2240–270 BP (290 BCE-1680 CE) - LPAZ 3: 41–0 cm, ca. 270 BP-present Interpretation and discussion - The Early Bronze Age (5150–4000 BP) - The Middle and Late Bronze Age (4000–3150 BP) - The end of the Late Bronze Age and the Early Iron Age (3150–2650 BP) - Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic period (2650–2096 BP) - The Roman period (2096–1620 BP) - Byzantine and Medieval period (1620–487 BP) - Ottoman and modern Greek period (487 BP-present) Conclusions

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Anna Baranowska-Rataj; Kieron Barclay; Joan Costa-Font; Mikko Myrskylä; Berkay Özcan;
    Publisher: Umeå universitet, Sociologiska institutionen
    Country: Sweden

    Although preterm birth is the leading cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality in advanced economies, evidence about the consequences of prematurity in later life is limited. Using Swedish registers for cohorts born 1982–94 (N = 1,087,750), we examine the effects of preterm birth on school grades at age 16 using sibling fixed effects models. We further examine how school grades are affected by degree of prematurity and the compensating roles of family socio-economic resources and characteristics of school districts. Our results show that the negative effects of preterm birth are observed mostly among children born extremely preterm (<28 weeks); children born moderately preterm (32–<37 weeks) suffer no ill effects. We do not find any evidence for a moderating effect of parental socio-economic resources. Children born extremely preterm and in the top decile of school districts achieve as good grades as children born at full term in an average school district.