Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Subject
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
20 Research products, page 1 of 2

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
  • Publications
  • 2017-2021
  • Other literature type
  • Part of book or chapter of book
  • English

10
arrow_drop_down
Relevance
arrow_drop_down
  • Publication . Other literature type . 2020
    English
    Authors: 
    M. Kelly, Robert;
    Publisher: Humanities Commons

    THE ZUBER PATRIARCHY Spring: Jean Zuber, fl.1790-1835; Summer: Jean Zuber-Karth, fl. 1836-1853; Autumn: Ivan (Jean) Zuber, fl. 1854-1907 This is the first of a multi-part series telling how the Zuber family made wallpaper over a 117-year period (1790-1907). It is closely based on the thesis “From the Workshop to the Wall” by Dr. Bernard Jacqué, see link at the end of this newsletter. Two disclaimers: the thesis is written in the French language. The possibility of errors in sense and transcription should be kept in mind. Secondly, these technical and biographical sketches are a radical concision of the thesis, which takes a bird’s-eye view of the history of wallpaper.

  • Publication . Article . Other literature type . 2020
    English
    Authors: 
    Robert M. Kelly;
    Publisher: Humanities Commons

    V. 1, N. 4 (April 15, 2020) is titled "Bernard Jacqué, His Thesis, and His Methods." It shows how Jacqué's work relates to that of Jules David Prown, an art historian credited with formulating an influential approach to material culture in the pages of the Winterthur Portfolio in the early 1980s.

  • Publication . Article . Other literature type . 2020
    English
    Authors: 
    Robert M. Kelly;
    Publisher: Humanities Commons

    V. 1, N. 2 (February 15, 2020) is titled "Wallpaper and America" and critiques Catherine Lynn's standard text from 1980, "Wallpaper In America."

  • Publication . Other literature type . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Munro, Sarah;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    In combination with a Masters of Fine arts thesis exhibition, The Longest Way Round is the Shortest Way Home, this dossier has three components: An extended artist statement with an introduction, documentation of my work and a comparative case study of Geoffrey Farmer and Hannah Hoch. These components will illustrate my research, visual development and engagement with items of home décor, ornamentation and design elements of daily life.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Neves, César;
    Publisher: De Gruyter
    Country: Portugal

    Abstract In this article, we study the role played by pottery production in the transition from Early Neolithic to Middle Neolithic in Western Iberia (∼4500–3300 cal BC) based on a critical analysis of the available empirical data. We establish a chronological and cultural sequence for this period, regarding which the historical problematic is still poorly defined due to a lasting absence of scientific discussion about the long Neolithisation process. During the evolved Early Neolithic (∼5200–4500 cal BC), archeological record shows regional specificities and cultural identities in human groups occupying a vast territory. Pottery collections evidence the strong social importance of decorative grammars, marked by a wide variety of techniques and decorative patterns. In quantitative terms, decorated vessels largely prevail over undecorated vessels. However, in the following chrono-cultural phase, the Initial Middle Neolithic (∼4500–3700 cal BC), it starts an increasing prevalence of undecorated vessels over decorated. Decorative systems prefer the incision technique to impression (dominant in the Early Neolithic). Recurrent use of an incised motif called incised line below the rim. In this period, this type of decoration prevails in the set of decorated pottery and is found in different geographic contexts. This adds consistency to the interpretation according to which the same artifact collections are found in all settlements of the initial Middle Neolithic. Finally, by the time of the first-known Megalithic burials – Full Moment of the Middle Neolithic (3700–3300 cal BC) – the decorative grammars almost disappear from pottery sets, which became more “common” and missed some of their symbolic and social meaning. Undecorated vessels prevail even more strongly than in the previous period.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2018
    English
    Authors: 
    Huet Thomas;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience; As with geography, ceramic decorations are essentially spatial organisations of features. Therefore, they should be analysed with spatial indexes. But spatial analyses, at the shard or the complete ceramic scale, are often difficult to set up, mostly because of the contiguity of graphical features.This paper presents a new method to record and analyse ceramic decoration. We use graph theory, with a GIS interface and Python programming, to analyse ceramic decoration in a bottom-up process. A priori definitions are minimal and only concern elementary units (morphological, graphical and plastic) which compose the ceramic.The studied corpus is composed of ceramic decorations belonging to the Mailhac I facies (Late Bronze Age), characterised by complex figurative compositions. Each decoration — complete or fragmented — is considered as a spatialized network (i.e. geometric graph). Graph theory provides tools to record and measure proximities between units and normalised indexes to compare different decorations, whatever their completeness. The GIS offers a graphic interface and ensures the correctness of spatial relationships between these units. The typology of these units is realised in a hierarchical oriented graph. This structure allows processes of generalisation (going up the tree) and specification (going down the tree), permitting comparison between units with different kinds of resolution and/or complexity. The method presented here can be used for other types of mediums(statuary, rock art, etc.).

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Athena Alexopoulou; Zoe Georgiadou; Panagiotis Ilias; Agathi Anthoula Kaminari;
    Publisher: MDPI AG

    This paper refers to the study of the Voyatzis mansion, in the port of Aegina, Greece. The building complex consists of two discrete structures, which were built at different times (before 1830, 1880 and 1890) and have housed either the Voyatzis family home or its business and work premises. The present research is focused on the documentation of the building, which was never published, and combines the architectural form and elements within its historical context as well as the physicochemical analysis of the painted decoration. The key hypothesis investigated is whether Konstantinos Voyatzis transferred the aesthetic approach and application techniques from Symi to Aegina, when he emigrated from his birthplace. The documentation of the ceiling decoration as well as the physicochemical study of the second floor’s internal wall painting decoration in the main rooms was carried out using in situ modern hyperspectral imaging in specific wavelengths of the visible and near-infrared region, as well as in false color infrared mode. Complementary SWIR imaging, using an InGaAs sensor at the range 900–1700 nm was also applied. The assumption was supported by the findings of the imaging techniques, which showed, apart from the secco method, the use of traditional pigments for the wall paintings, such as cobalt blue, brown, red and yellow earth pigments, chrome oxide green and black, sometimes in admixture with white. The use of guidelines and stencil in the case of the hallway was also recorded.

  • Publication . Article . Part of book or chapter of book . 2019
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Francesca Leoni; Diana Norris; Kelly Domoney; Moujan Matin; Andrew J. Shortland;
    Publisher: Brill Academic Publishers
    Country: United Kingdom

    Abstract In 2014 the Ashmolean Museum conserved and examined one of the largest and most handsome ceramic vessels in its renowned Islamic art collection. An accomplished example of early thirteenth-century Persian lusterware from the bequest of Sir Alan Barlow, the salver had an unusually deformed profile and uneven wear that pointed at a number of past interventions. Some of these had already been uncovered in 2008 when the object was prepared for reinstallation in the revamped Ashmolean. However, it was only when analyzed by a team of inhouse specialists and scientists from Cranfield University and the Research Laboratory for Archaeology at the University of Oxford, that the extraordinary nature of its “restoration” could be assessed. This article presents the results of this collaborative effort and contributes important evidence to the thorny issue of the faking and forging of Islamic ceramics in the early twentiethc century, when collecting Islamic decorative arts was at its peak.

  • Publication . Other literature type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Publisher: Utrecht University

    Bibliography of publications about the Utrecht Psalter up to 2019

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rafael María Martínez Sánchez; Juan Carlos Vera Rodríguez; Guillem Pérez Jordà; Leonor Peña Chocarro;
    Publisher: Ediciones Universidad de Salamanca
    Country: Spain

    Presentamos el estudio de los restos cerámicos de la fase neolítica de Kaf Taht el-Ghar (Mechrouha, Tetuán, Marruecos), enfocado principalmente en el análisis de técnicas y patrones decorativos. Ello cuenta con el interés añadido de corresponder, en su fase antigua, a las cerámicas asociadas a las primeras evidencias de agricultura y ganadería en el Magreb Occidental, encuadradas en el tercer cuarto del VI milenio cal AC. En dichas decoraciones dominan impresiones variadas, en particular las realizadas con concha estriada y lisa, peine y de cypraea. El uso de tales técnicas podría incluir estas primeras producciones cerámicas dentro del mundo impresso-cardial de la Europa mediterránea centro-occidental. A una fase avanzada, atribuida al Neolítico Medio, corresponde un conjunto de cerámicas con fuertes analogías y conexiones con la denominada Achakar Ware, de rasgos técnico-estilísticos marcadamente diferenciados. Entre estos se cuenta el uso de engobe colorante y la aplicación de impresiones con roulette cordada, lo que parece relacionar estas ultimas producciones con tradiciones propias del actual territorio del Sahara. Peer reviewed