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The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
8 Research products, page 1 of 1

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
  • Publications
  • 2017-2021
  • FR
  • English
  • Hyper Article en Ligne - Sciences de l'Homme et de la Société

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  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2018
    English
    Authors: 
    Huet Thomas;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience; As with geography, ceramic decorations are essentially spatial organisations of features. Therefore, they should be analysed with spatial indexes. But spatial analyses, at the shard or the complete ceramic scale, are often difficult to set up, mostly because of the contiguity of graphical features.This paper presents a new method to record and analyse ceramic decoration. We use graph theory, with a GIS interface and Python programming, to analyse ceramic decoration in a bottom-up process. A priori definitions are minimal and only concern elementary units (morphological, graphical and plastic) which compose the ceramic.The studied corpus is composed of ceramic decorations belonging to the Mailhac I facies (Late Bronze Age), characterised by complex figurative compositions. Each decoration — complete or fragmented — is considered as a spatialized network (i.e. geometric graph). Graph theory provides tools to record and measure proximities between units and normalised indexes to compare different decorations, whatever their completeness. The GIS offers a graphic interface and ensures the correctness of spatial relationships between these units. The typology of these units is realised in a hierarchical oriented graph. This structure allows processes of generalisation (going up the tree) and specification (going down the tree), permitting comparison between units with different kinds of resolution and/or complexity. The method presented here can be used for other types of mediums(statuary, rock art, etc.).

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Marc Groenen; Marie-Christine Groenen;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: Belgium, France

    The iconographic, formal and technical analysis of the decoration elements of El Castillo and La Pasiega (Cantabria) highlights a heterogeneous distribution of the main themes, with distribution logics that are very different in each of the caves. In El Castillo, the main themes appear in distinct sectors, each one containing a central area with a high density of motifs and an end that sets its limit. Consequently, the decoration appears as a mosaic formed of small sets of motifs. In contrast, using the same analysis criteria for the cave of La Pasiega shows that, besides motifs of the same type spread in the network space, there are more structured decorated sets. The set of Gallery A shows an increasing number of motifs from the beginning to the end of the sector, with a maximum density at the level of the back areas. In turn, the set of Gallery B comprises animal figures that stood out all the more to the viewers that they were illuminated by natural light. Whereas the decoration of Gallery A is organised in the manner of deep sanctuaries, the ornamentation of the Salle du Mégacéros of Gallery B falls rather in the logic of open-air sanctuaries. info:eu-repo/semantics/published SCOPUS: ar.j

  • English
    Authors: 
    Pioffet, H.; Ard, Vincent;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience; The British Neolithic transition, occurring around 4000 BC, at least one millennium after the continental part of Northwest Europe, is still subject to important debate these days. Various studies suggest that the Neolithic start involved farming immigrants from various parts of the Continent. However, ceramics of the Early Neolithic of Britain became increasingly distinct from their Continental roots, particularly in the Southwest and Southeast of England. We recently completed two important projects, one on Early Neolithic British and Irish pottery and the other on Peterborough Ware, integrating a new way of considering these early productions through a technological approach and the observation of various steps of the chaîne opératoire. This paper is the opportunity to present preliminary results which shed a new light on the evolution of pottery wares during the fourth millennium BC in Southern Britain. It specifically highlights strong connections between Early Neolithic and Middle Neolithic pottery, in terms of style, but above in terms of manufacturing techniques.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Debiais, Vincent;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    Session 203: Relics at the Interface between Textuality and Materiality, c. 400-c. 1200, II: Inscribing the Relics; International audience; Concentrating on inscriptions on late antique reliquaries from the eastern Mediterranean and on early medieval reliquaries from Western Europe, this panel explores how epigraphic texts participated in the presentation of the relics in their cult sites and how they contributed to explaining the relics’ or the reliquaries’ significance to the intended audience. The proposed papers approach the relations between textual contents, material characteristics of writing, supports and contexts via questions of visibility, legibility, and function of inscriptions.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Ingrand-Varenne, Estelle;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    Session 203: Relics at the Interface between Textuality and Materiality, c. 400-c. 1200, II: Inscribing the Relics; International audience; Concentrating on inscriptions on late antique reliquaries from the eastern Mediterranean and on early medieval reliquaries from Western Europe, this panel explores how epigraphic texts participated in the presentation of the relics in their cult sites and how they contributed to explaining the relics’ or the reliquaries’ significance to the intended audience. The proposed papers approach the relations between textual contents, material characteristics of writing, supports and contexts via questions of visibility, legibility, and function of inscriptions.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Christian Degrigny; Francesca Piqué;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience; The aim of this study was to examine and document the wall paintings in theChâteau de Germolles. Situated in Burgundy, France, Germolles is the best preservedresidence of the Dukes of Burgundy and was listed as a monument ofnational importance in 1989.The medieval wall decoration of the Château de Germolles was rediscoveredunder the nineteenth-century plasters during World War II. Medieval accounts ofthe château provide a detailed list of the materials acquired to make the muraldecoration, but this list is incongruous when compared with the current appearanceof the paintings. The discrepancy between the archival and material evidence,and also the need to understand the complexity of the painting technique usedwere the main motivations for undertaking the case study described in this chapter.Imaging alongside more traditional examination techniques were utilized torecord and document the mural decoration. The objectives of the case study wereto distinguish the original materials from those applied during restoration, identifythose materials, and correlate them with the archives. We also tried to understandthe medieval painting techniques used and assess the condition of the paintingsand stabilization requirements. Finally we aimed to find a sustainable solution forthe management of the various types of data collected. Various techniques andinvestigations offered valuable insights into the materials and the painting techniqueused. To improve visitor experience, based on the information gained in thecourse of this study, a 3D virtual representation of the original decoration is currentlyproposed for display to the public visiting the Château de Germolles.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Yves Porter; Richard Castinel;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    Abstract The Begumpuri or Jamiʿ (Friday) Masjid of Jahanpanah (Delhi) is an impressive monument built during the Tughluq period, circa 1343. Although often credited to Firuz Shah (1351–88), the mosque was probably ordered by Muhammad Shah Tughluq (1325–51), since it was situated next to his royal palace in the heart of his capital (Jahanpanah). The Begumpuri Masjid represents a particular phase in the sequence of Tughluq architecture, both for its plan and elevation, and for its architectural decoration. It has often been described as a “Persianate” four-iwan mosque, although such a designation seems inappropriate. This article explores the probable patronage of the mosque by Muhammad Tughluq and its siting at the center of Jahanpanah. The plan and elevation of the mosque are detailed, with a discussion on the possible models for the building, together with its vernacular characteristics. We then present a study of the architectural decoration, made in stone, stucco, and turquoise glazed tiles. The peculiar features of the Begumpuri Masjid make it a unique monument celebrating the grandeur of Muhammad Tughluq through its huge and void court, as well as in its mulūk khāna (Royal Loggia).

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Fabien Salmon; Catherine Ferrier; Delphine Lacanette; Jean-Christophe Mindeguia; Jean-Claude Leblanc; Carole Fritz; Colette Sirieix;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    The Chauvet-Pont d’Arc Cave (Ardèche, France), famous for its remarkable rock art, also contains unique thermal-alterations such as rock spalling and color changes on the walls. These alterations resulted from intense fires that have not been observed in the other decorated caves thus far discovered. The functions of these unusual fires challenge archaeologists. To characterize these combustions, we used a numerical tool, previously validated with experimental data, to study the thermo-alterations in the Megaceros Gallery. This unprecedented approach in cave art research enabled us to assess the wood quantities and locations of the hearths responsible for the thermo-alterations. We report here that at least ten fires took place in the Megaceros Gallery while burning more than 170 kg of wood. Both simulation and in situ observations suggest that the branches were arranged in a tepee shape and purposefully positioned, some distance from the walls. This method therefore enables further analysis of the functions of these fires.