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  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
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  • 2013-2022
  • English
  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Börjesson, Lisa;
    Publisher: TextRelease

    Professional (i.e. extra-academic) contract archaeology is an internationally widespread practice contributing significantly to the archaeology literature. However, professional knowledge production in archaeology, and most notably the professional report genre, is at times described as problematic. The problem descriptions are ambiguous and can be grouped under at least three different topics: concerns for content quality and practical accessibility, concerns for the comparably low degree of analytical and theoretical synthesizing in reports and concerns for lack of mutual knowledge transfer between academic archaeologists and professional archaeologists. Technical issues of access are to an increasing extent being solved. Format standardizations are also developing. Hence the report genre becomes more accessible, and the content more readable and informative. Yet articulations of attitudes toward the genre in archaeology text books and journal articles remain focused on the genre’s problems. The aim of my ongoing dissertation research is to nuance the understanding of the professional report genre in archaeology. I do so by analyzing factors shaping reporting as it takes place in the intersection between academic norms, professional values and market logics. I argue an improved genre understanding is crucial to diminish cultural issues of access to the report literature, and also as a basis for development of reporting practices. In the dissertation research I analyze (1) perceptions about the report genre in archaeology literature, (2) information policy regulating reporting in archaeology, (3) how report writers and county board professionals interpret the reporting and report auditing work tasks and (4) the frames of reference report writers bring into reporting. The aim of this paper is to explicate the research design consisting of four sub-studies, to briefly report on findings from study no. 4, and to discuss preliminary, partial results from study no. 2.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    McIsaac, Stephen Robert;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    In contemporary South Africa, spatial segregation, racism, and economic exclusion remain trenchant features of everyday life twenty-five years after the end of apartheid. Based on twenty months of ethnographic research in the township of Khayelitsha and Cape Town more broadly, this dissertation tracks different post-apartheid approaches to mental health care, which attempt to address these ongoing legacies. Through extensive fieldwork at a community-based organization that provides therapeutic support in isiXhosa, I argue that therapeutic practices by black South Africans de-stabilize and experiment with the normative confines of the psychotherapeutic encounter. Rather than treat individual psyches, therapists’ practices are oriented toward the relational space between generations, a political therapeutic driven by the affective force of the therapists’ own history of struggle toward a different future for black youth, who continue to be marked by the legacies of colonialism and apartheid (what I call “generational care” throughout the dissertation). Second, I argue that normative psychology continues to assume a nuclear family configuration as the norm against which all pathology is judged and therapeutic interventions practiced. I suggest this is particularly so for theories of attachment and infant development, which assume that only a particular configuration of the family—biological parents who unconditionally care for a child in the same physical space as them—is productive of “stable” subjects later in life. By following the history of psychiatry in South Africa, narratives of care from mental health professionals working on the Cape Flats, as well as policy and research agendas, I track how discourses of “cultural difference” evade processes of racialization and consequential racisms in normative psychological theories and interventions. I argue that different practical and conceptual therapeutic experiments are necessary, ones that imagine forms of care adequate to the lived afterlives of the settler-colonial project, and particularly ones for those related outside the nuclear family form.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Avalloni de Morais, Rene;
    Country: Canada

    Call Centers or Support Centers in different companies aggregate huge amount of audio data everyday. From all the conversations, few conversations demonstrate the disappointment of clients towards services, products or delivery. Finding the sentiment of the customer helps in determining whether the customer was satisfied with the service, product or not. However, manually analyzing the huge amount of audio data is time consuming, laborious, and burdensome. The aim of this research is to develop the deep learning based model which would enable to automatically evaluate the sentiment of a customer throughout a conversation with a call center agent. In this work, we developed Long Term Short Memory (LSTM) based deep learning models for customer audio call data analysis. The proposed pipeline consists of two sequential steps: a) Audio transcription: speech recognition of the conversations and document them in text; and b) Sentiment Analysis: conduct the sentiment analysis on the text data using Natural Language Processing (NLP). We compute spectrogram features from audio data and then fine-tune the LSTM based Deep Speech Model using customer call data. Deep Speech model can successfully transcribe the conversations between client and call center agent in a text form. Then we compute the 1-gram feature from text data which find the occurrence of the words responsible to identify the customer sentiments. We fed this feature into a LSTM based deep architecture which would enable to detect customer sentiments from text data. Recent advances in natural language understanding and generation facilitates to detect customer sentiments successfully as accurate as human experts. Both speech transcription and sentiment analysis part of the proposed tool are very generic in nature which could utilize for other audio data transcription and text sentiment analysis purposes. Tools were developed in python which can be easily transported and adapted in other programming environments.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Allen, Meaghan;
    Publisher: LSE Review of Books
    Country: United Kingdom

    In Byzantine Intersectionality: Sexuality, Gender and Race in the Middle Ages, Roland Betancourt offers a new study that challenges the way that scholars have historically viewed Byzantine society and culture, using the methodology of intersectionality to uncover marginalised identities and recover medieval conversations around sexual and reproductive consent, sexual shaming and bullying, sexual attraction and desire, trans and nonbinary gender identities and the depiction of racialised minorities. This is an exciting and radical new project with an ethical dimension and urgency, writes Meaghan Allen, that seeks to illuminate forgotten figures and lived experiences that ripple through into our present moment.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Zárate, Salvador Elias;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    My dissertation positions Black and Mexican migrant women workers’ reproductive labor as the foundation of Jim Crow era agriculture and extractive economies. My sites of analysis include racialized women’s reproductive labor in turpentine and lumber camps in Northwest Florida, the cotton fields of the San Joaquin Valley, and beet picking in Bracero era Salinas Valley. This dissertation argues that although women were contracted through relations of marriage and family to industries that produced their labor as non-value and which erased them as historical subjects, they created forms of sociality in excess to the demands of capital. Such an examination brings into conversation Critical Gender Studies, Black Studies, and Chicana/o Studies, alongside interventions by women of color feminists into Marxist labor theory, to reveal how Black and Mexican women workers created forms of life while negotiating the depletion their own. To explore the transmission of their life producing labor, I dovetail readings of plays, legal affidavits, and poems about turpentine debt bondage; coming-of-age stories about Black and Mexican migrant children’s reproductive labor in the cotton economy; oral histories about beet harvesting during the Bracero Program and the transnational labor of Mexican women on which it relied; and experimental ethnographies on Black and Mexican migrants’ gardening practices. Ultimately, this dissertation opens new lines of theoretical inquiry for exploring early twentieth century agriculture and extractive industries by centering the little explored histories of Black and Mexican women’s reproductive labor.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Wolfe, Hannah E.;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    This dissertation is the study of a series of media art installations that deal with embodied technology which allows humans to interact with computers in different contexts. It explores the social effects of ubiquitous technology and the role for embodied media arts as a critique of interactive digital technologies which are replacing physically present forms of communication with our environment and with each other. In these works I examined the affordances of different physical spaces and observed how the social dynamics were affected. To probe these systems, I am using affective computing (computational expression of emotion) and tangible computing (objects with computational power). Intimate spaces allow for the ability to touch and to hold technology. Here the emotive haptic and emotive sonic response of a robot changed the way that people interacted with and viewed the robot and each other. Whether someone was directly interacting with the robot or simply observing drastically changed the emotion they thought the robot was expressing. Social spaces allow for the ability to interact interpersonally with technology. I explore how interactions change when they are embodied and public, while examining gender roles, female agency, and the line between human and machine. Interactive environments allow for movement and for multiple people interacting with large amounts of information and therefore each other. Personal mobile technology, multimodal interfaces, and distributed interfaces were used to allow multiple people to interact with the system and each other. Through these works, I show that media artworks, which embody technology and give it emotive qualities, critique the way that technology is used and change the way that people interact with it.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Strathman, Nicole Dawn;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    At the turn of the twentieth century, photographers like Edward Curtis were creating romanticized images of Americans Indians. Far from merely serving as camera fodder, however, Native Americans during this period were independently producing their own photographic records. This dissertation offers a critical overview of how Native North Americans appropriated photography and integrated it into their ways of life in the second half of the nineteenth and the early twentieth centuries, both as patrons who commissioned portraits and as photographers who created collections. In this study, I investigate the practices through which Native-produced photographs have become entangled in a set of performative acts of remembrance that have helped sustain and generate tribal histories. The primary sources under investigation are early snapshots dating to approximately 1890 to 1940, created for and by indigenous peoples throughout the United States and Canada. By arguing that these photographs stand as counter-images to the hegemonic visual histories of their peoples, I demonstrate that Native-produced images undermine dominant narratives while simultaneously endorsing their own tribal histories. My goal is to prove that "Native American photography" as practiced by and for Native Americans is profoundly different than photography practiced by contemporary non-Natives.To help support these claims, I provide two case studies of amateur Native photographies that have become part of their cultural consciousness by virtue of being displayed in their respective community museums. Unlike most domestic images, the photographs taken by Jennie Ross Cobb (Cherokee) and George Johnston (Inland Tlingit) were neither bequeathed to family members nor gifted to friends. Instead, these photographers donated their images to aid in the foundation of new museums in their respective tribal communities. In the case of George Johnston, the eponymous museum in Teslin, Yukon Territory, was built to hold and preserve the photographs, while the pictures by Jennie Ross Cobb contributed to the efforts to valorize and restore the historic George M. Murrell Home in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, where they are now displayed. These localized, self-contained collections allow for an unprecedented look at how vernacular photographs work within indigenous communities to perform and recover memories.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2013
    Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Parker, David S;
    Publisher: History
    Country: Canada

    The exam from HIST315 (History) in December 2013

  • English
    Authors: 
    Northern Ireland, Department of Health;
    Publisher: UK Data Service

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The Health Survey Northern Ireland, 2011-2012 provides a source of information on a wide range of health issues relevant to Northern Ireland. The information collected is pursuing the development of policies aimed at improving the health and well-being of the Northern Ireland population. Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The Health Survey Northern Ireland was commissioned by the Department of Health in Northern Ireland and the Central Survey Unit (CSU) of the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA) carried out the survey on their behalf. This survey series has been running on a continuous basis since April 2010 with separate modules for different policy areas included in different financial years. It covers a range of health topics that are important to the lives of people in Northern Ireland today, and replaces the Northern Ireland Health and Social Wellbeing Survey (available from the UK Data Service under SNs 4589, 4590, 5710). Further information is available from the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency and the Department of Health (Northern Ireland) survey webpages. Main Topics:The 2011-2012 questionnaire asked questions on the following topics: basic household information general health and sexual health specific medical conditions changes made to improve health flu vaccinations physical activity home care and carers dietary information and food security child health and perceptions of child's weight smoking and drinking religion sexual identity smoke alarms self-completion of GHQ12, Warwick Edinburgh, cervical smear, breast screening, EQ5D Standard Measures: 12-item EQ5D health Questionnaire 14-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) 14-item Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale (WEMWBS) Simple random sample Face-to-face interview Self-completion Physical measurements

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Morando Pablo;
    Country: Greece

    Τα αρχαία ελληνικά ζωγραφισμένα αγγεία, λόγω των περιγραφικών εικόνων τους, αποτελούν μια τεράστια πηγή πληροφοριών για κάθε είδους θέματα σχετικά με τη λειτουργία και τη νοοτροπία της ελληνικής κοινωνίας.Με μια ανασκόπηση των απεικονίσεων και των λεπτομερειών που αναφέρονται σε αθλήματα και άλλες αθλητικές δραστηριότητες σε γλάστρες από τη Γεωμετρική περίοδο έως την Κλασική, σκοπεύω να δώσω μια επισκόπηση της ελληνικής προοπτικής και της άποψης για την αθλητική δραστηριότητα κατά τη διάρκεια αυτών των περιόδων και ρόλος που διαδραματίζουν οι αθλητικές δραστηριότητες και πώς σχετίζονται με το παρόν. Ancient Greek painted pots, due to their descriptive imagery, constitute a tremendous source of information about all sorts of matters regarding the functioning and mentality of Greek society. With a review of the depictions and details making reference to sports and other athletic activities on pots from the Geometric period to the Classical one, I intend to provide an overview of the Greek perspective and view towards athletic activity throughout these periods and the role played by athletic activities and how they relate to the present.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
4,224 Research products, page 1 of 423
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Börjesson, Lisa;
    Publisher: TextRelease

    Professional (i.e. extra-academic) contract archaeology is an internationally widespread practice contributing significantly to the archaeology literature. However, professional knowledge production in archaeology, and most notably the professional report genre, is at times described as problematic. The problem descriptions are ambiguous and can be grouped under at least three different topics: concerns for content quality and practical accessibility, concerns for the comparably low degree of analytical and theoretical synthesizing in reports and concerns for lack of mutual knowledge transfer between academic archaeologists and professional archaeologists. Technical issues of access are to an increasing extent being solved. Format standardizations are also developing. Hence the report genre becomes more accessible, and the content more readable and informative. Yet articulations of attitudes toward the genre in archaeology text books and journal articles remain focused on the genre’s problems. The aim of my ongoing dissertation research is to nuance the understanding of the professional report genre in archaeology. I do so by analyzing factors shaping reporting as it takes place in the intersection between academic norms, professional values and market logics. I argue an improved genre understanding is crucial to diminish cultural issues of access to the report literature, and also as a basis for development of reporting practices. In the dissertation research I analyze (1) perceptions about the report genre in archaeology literature, (2) information policy regulating reporting in archaeology, (3) how report writers and county board professionals interpret the reporting and report auditing work tasks and (4) the frames of reference report writers bring into reporting. The aim of this paper is to explicate the research design consisting of four sub-studies, to briefly report on findings from study no. 4, and to discuss preliminary, partial results from study no. 2.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    McIsaac, Stephen Robert;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    In contemporary South Africa, spatial segregation, racism, and economic exclusion remain trenchant features of everyday life twenty-five years after the end of apartheid. Based on twenty months of ethnographic research in the township of Khayelitsha and Cape Town more broadly, this dissertation tracks different post-apartheid approaches to mental health care, which attempt to address these ongoing legacies. Through extensive fieldwork at a community-based organization that provides therapeutic support in isiXhosa, I argue that therapeutic practices by black South Africans de-stabilize and experiment with the normative confines of the psychotherapeutic encounter. Rather than treat individual psyches, therapists’ practices are oriented toward the relational space between generations, a political therapeutic driven by the affective force of the therapists’ own history of struggle toward a different future for black youth, who continue to be marked by the legacies of colonialism and apartheid (what I call “generational care” throughout the dissertation). Second, I argue that normative psychology continues to assume a nuclear family configuration as the norm against which all pathology is judged and therapeutic interventions practiced. I suggest this is particularly so for theories of attachment and infant development, which assume that only a particular configuration of the family—biological parents who unconditionally care for a child in the same physical space as them—is productive of “stable” subjects later in life. By following the history of psychiatry in South Africa, narratives of care from mental health professionals working on the Cape Flats, as well as policy and research agendas, I track how discourses of “cultural difference” evade processes of racialization and consequential racisms in normative psychological theories and interventions. I argue that different practical and conceptual therapeutic experiments are necessary, ones that imagine forms of care adequate to the lived afterlives of the settler-colonial project, and particularly ones for those related outside the nuclear family form.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Avalloni de Morais, Rene;
    Country: Canada

    Call Centers or Support Centers in different companies aggregate huge amount of audio data everyday. From all the conversations, few conversations demonstrate the disappointment of clients towards services, products or delivery. Finding the sentiment of the customer helps in determining whether the customer was satisfied with the service, product or not. However, manually analyzing the huge amount of audio data is time consuming, laborious, and burdensome. The aim of this research is to develop the deep learning based model which would enable to automatically evaluate the sentiment of a customer throughout a conversation with a call center agent. In this work, we developed Long Term Short Memory (LSTM) based deep learning models for customer audio call data analysis. The proposed pipeline consists of two sequential steps: a) Audio transcription: speech recognition of the conversations and document them in text; and b) Sentiment Analysis: conduct the sentiment analysis on the text data using Natural Language Processing (NLP). We compute spectrogram features from audio data and then fine-tune the LSTM based Deep Speech Model using customer call data. Deep Speech model can successfully transcribe the conversations between client and call center agent in a text form. Then we compute the 1-gram feature from text data which find the occurrence of the words responsible to identify the customer sentiments. We fed this feature into a LSTM based deep architecture which would enable to detect customer sentiments from text data. Recent advances in natural language understanding and generation facilitates to detect customer sentiments successfully as accurate as human experts. Both speech transcription and sentiment analysis part of the proposed tool are very generic in nature which could utilize for other audio data transcription and text sentiment analysis purposes. Tools were developed in python which can be easily transported and adapted in other programming environments.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Allen, Meaghan;
    Publisher: LSE Review of Books
    Country: United Kingdom

    In Byzantine Intersectionality: Sexuality, Gender and Race in the Middle Ages, Roland Betancourt offers a new study that challenges the way that scholars have historically viewed Byzantine society and culture, using the methodology of intersectionality to uncover marginalised identities and recover medieval conversations around sexual and reproductive consent, sexual shaming and bullying, sexual attraction and desire, trans and nonbinary gender identities and the depiction of racialised minorities. This is an exciting and radical new project with an ethical dimension and urgency, writes Meaghan Allen, that seeks to illuminate forgotten figures and lived experiences that ripple through into our present moment.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Zárate, Salvador Elias;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    My dissertation positions Black and Mexican migrant women workers’ reproductive labor as the foundation of Jim Crow era agriculture and extractive economies. My sites of analysis include racialized women’s reproductive labor in turpentine and lumber camps in Northwest Florida, the cotton fields of the San Joaquin Valley, and beet picking in Bracero era Salinas Valley. This dissertation argues that although women were contracted through relations of marriage and family to industries that produced their labor as non-value and which erased them as historical subjects, they created forms of sociality in excess to the demands of capital. Such an examination brings into conversation Critical Gender Studies, Black Studies, and Chicana/o Studies, alongside interventions by women of color feminists into Marxist labor theory, to reveal how Black and Mexican women workers created forms of life while negotiating the depletion their own. To explore the transmission of their life producing labor, I dovetail readings of plays, legal affidavits, and poems about turpentine debt bondage; coming-of-age stories about Black and Mexican migrant children’s reproductive labor in the cotton economy; oral histories about beet harvesting during the Bracero Program and the transnational labor of Mexican women on which it relied; and experimental ethnographies on Black and Mexican migrants’ gardening practices. Ultimately, this dissertation opens new lines of theoretical inquiry for exploring early twentieth century agriculture and extractive industries by centering the little explored histories of Black and Mexican women’s reproductive labor.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Wolfe, Hannah E.;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    This dissertation is the study of a series of media art installations that deal with embodied technology which allows humans to interact with computers in different contexts. It explores the social effects of ubiquitous technology and the role for embodied media arts as a critique of interactive digital technologies which are replacing physically present forms of communication with our environment and with each other. In these works I examined the affordances of different physical spaces and observed how the social dynamics were affected. To probe these systems, I am using affective computing (computational expression of emotion) and tangible computing (objects with computational power). Intimate spaces allow for the ability to touch and to hold technology. Here the emotive haptic and emotive sonic response of a robot changed the way that people interacted with and viewed the robot and each other. Whether someone was directly interacting with the robot or simply observing drastically changed the emotion they thought the robot was expressing. Social spaces allow for the ability to interact interpersonally with technology. I explore how interactions change when they are embodied and public, while examining gender roles, female agency, and the line between human and machine. Interactive environments allow for movement and for multiple people interacting with large amounts of information and therefore each other. Personal mobile technology, multimodal interfaces, and distributed interfaces were used to allow multiple people to interact with the system and each other. Through these works, I show that media artworks, which embody technology and give it emotive qualities, critique the way that technology is used and change the way that people interact with it.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Strathman, Nicole Dawn;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    At the turn of the twentieth century, photographers like Edward Curtis were creating romanticized images of Americans Indians. Far from merely serving as camera fodder, however, Native Americans during this period were independently producing their own photographic records. This dissertation offers a critical overview of how Native North Americans appropriated photography and integrated it into their ways of life in the second half of the nineteenth and the early twentieth centuries, both as patrons who commissioned portraits and as photographers who created collections. In this study, I investigate the practices through which Native-produced photographs have become entangled in a set of performative acts of remembrance that have helped sustain and generate tribal histories. The primary sources under investigation are early snapshots dating to approximately 1890 to 1940, created for and by indigenous peoples throughout the United States and Canada. By arguing that these photographs stand as counter-images to the hegemonic visual histories of their peoples, I demonstrate that Native-produced images undermine dominant narratives while simultaneously endorsing their own tribal histories. My goal is to prove that "Native American photography" as practiced by and for Native Americans is profoundly different than photography practiced by contemporary non-Natives.To help support these claims, I provide two case studies of amateur Native photographies that have become part of their cultural consciousness by virtue of being displayed in their respective community museums. Unlike most domestic images, the photographs taken by Jennie Ross Cobb (Cherokee) and George Johnston (Inland Tlingit) were neither bequeathed to family members nor gifted to friends. Instead, these photographers donated their images to aid in the foundation of new museums in their respective tribal communities. In the case of George Johnston, the eponymous museum in Teslin, Yukon Territory, was built to hold and preserve the photographs, while the pictures by Jennie Ross Cobb contributed to the efforts to valorize and restore the historic George M. Murrell Home in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, where they are now displayed. These localized, self-contained collections allow for an unprecedented look at how vernacular photographs work within indigenous communities to perform and recover memories.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2013
    Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Parker, David S;
    Publisher: History
    Country: Canada

    The exam from HIST315 (History) in December 2013

  • English
    Authors: 
    Northern Ireland, Department of Health;
    Publisher: UK Data Service

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The Health Survey Northern Ireland, 2011-2012 provides a source of information on a wide range of health issues relevant to Northern Ireland. The information collected is pursuing the development of policies aimed at improving the health and well-being of the Northern Ireland population. Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The Health Survey Northern Ireland was commissioned by the Department of Health in Northern Ireland and the Central Survey Unit (CSU) of the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA) carried out the survey on their behalf. This survey series has been running on a continuous basis since April 2010 with separate modules for different policy areas included in different financial years. It covers a range of health topics that are important to the lives of people in Northern Ireland today, and replaces the Northern Ireland Health and Social Wellbeing Survey (available from the UK Data Service under SNs 4589, 4590, 5710). Further information is available from the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency and the Department of Health (Northern Ireland) survey webpages. Main Topics:The 2011-2012 questionnaire asked questions on the following topics: basic household information general health and sexual health specific medical conditions changes made to improve health flu vaccinations physical activity home care and carers dietary information and food security child health and perceptions of child's weight smoking and drinking religion sexual identity smoke alarms self-completion of GHQ12, Warwick Edinburgh, cervical smear, breast screening, EQ5D Standard Measures: 12-item EQ5D health Questionnaire 14-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) 14-item Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale (WEMWBS) Simple random sample Face-to-face interview Self-completion Physical measurements

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Morando Pablo;
    Country: Greece

    Τα αρχαία ελληνικά ζωγραφισμένα αγγεία, λόγω των περιγραφικών εικόνων τους, αποτελούν μια τεράστια πηγή πληροφοριών για κάθε είδους θέματα σχετικά με τη λειτουργία και τη νοοτροπία της ελληνικής κοινωνίας.Με μια ανασκόπηση των απεικονίσεων και των λεπτομερειών που αναφέρονται σε αθλήματα και άλλες αθλητικές δραστηριότητες σε γλάστρες από τη Γεωμετρική περίοδο έως την Κλασική, σκοπεύω να δώσω μια επισκόπηση της ελληνικής προοπτικής και της άποψης για την αθλητική δραστηριότητα κατά τη διάρκεια αυτών των περιόδων και ρόλος που διαδραματίζουν οι αθλητικές δραστηριότητες και πώς σχετίζονται με το παρόν. Ancient Greek painted pots, due to their descriptive imagery, constitute a tremendous source of information about all sorts of matters regarding the functioning and mentality of Greek society. With a review of the depictions and details making reference to sports and other athletic activities on pots from the Geometric period to the Classical one, I intend to provide an overview of the Greek perspective and view towards athletic activity throughout these periods and the role played by athletic activities and how they relate to the present.