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The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
46 Research products, page 1 of 5

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
  • Research software
  • Other research products
  • 2018-2022
  • Other ORP type
  • Rural Digital Europe

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  • English
    Authors: 
    Stancioff, C.E. (Universiteit Leiden);
    Publisher: Universiteit Leiden

    Processed interview data of the Kalinago Territory research belonging to Landscape, Land-Change & Well-Being in the Lesser Antilles. This reseach was carried out as part of European Research Council under the European Union’s Seventh Framework Program (FP7/2007-2013) NEXUS1492, ERC grant agreement no 319209.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Danish
    Authors: 
    Museet på Koldinghus;
    Publisher: Slots- og Kulturstyrelsen (www.slks.dk)

    This record describes ancient sites and monuments as well archaeological excavations undertaken by Danish museums. Excerpt of the Danish description of events:

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Pasternak, Gil;
    Country: United Kingdom

    This special issue of the journal Photography & Culture (volume 14, issue 3) calls for the development of research into the various local and global political circumstances that have influenced the absorption of historical photographs into the realm of digital heritage, alongside the study of the digital photographic heritagization practices triggered by this very process. Presenting case studies from Australia, Britain, Israel, Palestine, Russia and South Africa, it analyses how historical photographs, digital heritage, and cultural conflicts have become interlocked in multiple countries around the globe since the post-Cold War rising prevalence of digital technology, global interconnectedness, and liberal democracy. These related conditions, it is suggested, have informed the growing digital heritagization of historical photographs and the methods used for their digitization, safeguarding and dissemination. Therefore, as a whole, the special issue argues that the confluence of historical photographs and digital heritage must not be understood as a mere response to technological progress but as an articulation of politically-charged aspirations to capitalize on the common association of photographs with the past, to administer approaches to differing cultural values in a time of imposing liberal-democratic politics of consensus.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nyhan, Julianne; Hauswedell, Tessa; Terras, Melissa; Beals, Melodee; Bell, Emily;
    Publisher: University College London UCL

    Interview questionnaire about the selection criteria used by digital archives of historical newspapers. The corresponding article where the results of the survey are summarised and analysed is:Hauswedell, T., Nyhan, J., Beals, M.H. et al. Of global reach yet of situated contexts: an examination of the implicit and explicit selection criteria that shape digital archives of historical newspapers. Arch Sci 20, 139–165 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10502-020-09332-1

  • Open Access German
    Authors: 
    Jagusch, Gerald Wolfgang; Preuß, Nils;
    Publisher: TU Darmstadt

    Die Online-Umfrage "NFDI4Ing - Rückmeldung aus den Forschungscommunities" wurde vom Konsortium NFDI4Ing (Nationale Forschungsdateninfrastruktur für die Ingenieurwissenschaften, https://nfdi4ing.de) vom 21.08.2019 bis einschließlich 16.09.2019 durchgeführt. Zielgruppe waren die Leiter von ingenieurwissenschaftlichen Forschungsgruppen, im Sinne von Lehrstühlen / Professurenn / Fachgebieten an Hochschulen und Universitäten sowie Verbundprojekte (z.B. SFBs) und einzelne Forschungsabteilungen außeruniversitärer Forschungseinrichtungen (z.B. Forschungsbereiche eines Fraunhofer-Instituts). Es wurden alle ingenieurwissenschaftlichen Forschungseinrichtungen Deutschlands angeschrieben (Fachbereiche von Universitäten und Hochschulen, Verbundprojekte (SFBs, GRKs, Exzellenzcluster), Fraunhofer-, Leibniz-, Max-Planck-Institute, Helmholtz-Zentren, Ressortforschungseinrichtungen, Fachgesellschaften- und verbände). Insgesamt wurden 701 Fragebögen ausgefüllt, davon 618 vollständig.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Danish
    Authors: 
    Museum Nordsjælland;
    Publisher: Slots- og Kulturstyrelsen (www.slks.dk)

    This record describes ancient sites and monuments as well archaeological excavations undertaken by Danish museums. Excerpt of the Danish description of events: 2008-01-17: Lokaliteten mgl. data.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Salmoral, G, Cranfield University; Holman, I, Cranfield University; Ababio, B, Cranfield University; Knox, J, Cranfield University; Rey, D, Cranfield University;
    Publisher: UK Data Service

    The agricultural drought inventory for the UK is a subset of data from the UK Drought Inventory. This dataset contains qualitative drought data related to UK agriculture based on an extensive review of two weekly farming magazines in the UK: Farmers Weekly and Farmers Guardian for the 2018 summer drought. This inventory is a complement of the existing Historic droughts inventory of references from agricultural media 1975-2012 (Rey et al., 2019), also available in ReShare (see Related Resources). This dataset contains a total of 1,098 references. The inventory follows a standard format (based on the European Drought Impact Report Inventory, EDII), common to the other sectoral collection of references, that allows their combination for drought analysis and characterisation. Thus, it stores information on the start and end dates of the event and their location (local and regional based on NUTS regions) to characterise the temporal and spatial extents of the cited event. The events/entries are categorised as drivers, impacts, responses and includes a sample of text from the source. Entries for years different from 2018 are related to content about a previous drought (e.g., 1976) that is mentioned in 2018.Historic Droughts was a four year (2014-2018), £1.5m project funded by the UK Research Councils, aiming to develop a cross-disciplinary understanding of past drought episodes that have affected the United Kingdom (UK), with a view to developing improved tools for managing droughts in future. Drought and water scarcity (DWS) events are significant threats to livelihoods and wellbeing in many countries, including the UK. Parts of the UK are already water-stressed and are facing a wide range of pressures, including an expanding population and intensifying exploitation of increasingly limited water resources. In addition, many regions may become significantly drier in future due to environmental changes, all of which implies major challenges to water resource management. However, DWS events are not simply natural hazards. There are also a range of socio-economic and regulatory factors that may influence the course of droughts, such as water consumption practices and abstraction licensing regimes. Consequently, if DWS events are to be better managed, there is a need for a more detailed understanding of the links between hydrometeorological and social systems during droughts. With this research gap in mind, the Historic Droughts project aimed to develop an interdisciplinary understanding of drought from a range of different perspectives. Based on an analysis of information from a wide range of sectors (hydrometeorological, environmental, agricultural, regulatory, social and cultural), the project characterised and quantified the history of drought and water scarcity events since the late 19th century. The Historic Droughts project involved eight institutions across the UK: the British Geological Survey the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Cranfield University, the University of Exeter, HR Wallingford, Lancaster University, the Met Office, and the University of Oxford. Extensive review of two weekly farming magazines in the UK: Farmers Weekly and Farmers Guardian for 2018. The issues are in electronic format (in ProQuest, accessed via Cranfield University Library website). The search terms were: drought, dry weather/spell, rainfall/precipitation, soil moisture, water scarcity/stress/deficit. After all the references containing one or more of these terms were collected, the content was screening and only the relevant ones were included in the inventory (spreadsheet format).

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Danish
    Authors: 
    Museum Sønderjylland;
    Publisher: Slots- og Kulturstyrelsen (www.slks.dk)

    This record describes ancient sites and monuments as well archaeological excavations undertaken by Danish museums. Excerpt of the Danish description of events: 2011-08-30: Fortidsmindet blev fundet - der mangler fredningstekst.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Sanchez, A., Grupo de Analisis para el Desarollo (GRADE) (Peru); Woldehanna, T., Ethiopian Development Research Institute; Duc, L. Thuc, Vietnam Academy of Social Sciences (CAF-VASS); Boyden, J., University of Oxford, Queen Elizabeth House; Penny, M., Instituto de Investigacion Nutricional (IIN) (Peru); Galab, S., Centre for Economic and Social Studies (CESS) (India);
    Publisher: UK Data Service

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The Young Lives survey is an innovative long-term project investigating the changing nature of childhood poverty in four developing countries. The purpose of the project is to improve understanding of the causes and consequences of childhood poverty and examine how policies affect children's well-being, in order to inform the development of future policy and to target child welfare interventions more effectively. The study is being conducted in Ethiopia, India, Peru and Vietnam. These countries were selected because they reflect a range of cultural, geographical and social contexts and experience differing issues facing the developing world; high debt burden, emergence from conflict, and vulnerability to environmental conditions such as drought and flood. The Young Lives study aims to track the lives of 12,000 children over a 15-year period, surveyed once every 3-4 years. Round 1 of Young Lives surveyed two groups of children in each country, at 1 year old and 5 years old. Round 2 returned to the same children who were then aged 5 and 12 years old. Round 3 surveyed the same children again at aged 7-8 years and 14-15 years, Round 4 surveyed them at 12 and 19 years old, and Round 5 surveyed them at 15 and 22 years old. Thus the younger children are being tracked from infancy to their mid-teens and the older children through into adulthood, when some will become parents themselves. The survey consists of three main elements: a child questionnaire, a household questionnaire and a community questionnaire. The household data gathered is similar to other cross-sectional datasets (such as the World Bank's Living Standards Measurement Study). It covers a range of topics such as household composition, livelihood and assets, household expenditure, child health and access to basic services, and education. This is supplemented with additional questions that cover caregiver perceptions, attitudes, and aspirations for their child and the family. Young Lives also collects detailed time-use data for all family members, information about the child's weight and height (and that of caregivers), and tests the children for school outcomes (language comprehension and mathematics). An important element of the survey asks the children about their daily activities, their experiences and attitudes to work and school, their likes and dislikes, how they feel they are treated by other people, and their hopes and aspirations for the future. The community questionnaire provides background information about the social, economic and environmental context of each community. It covers topics such as ethnicity, religion, economic activity and employment, infrastructure and services, political representation and community networks, crime and environmental changes. The Young Lives survey is carried out by teams of local researchers, supported by the Principal Investigator and Data Manager in each country. Further information about the survey, including publications, can be downloaded from the Young Lives website. This study includes data and documentation for Round 5 only. Round 1 is available under SN 5307, Round 2 under SN 6852, Round 3 under SN 6853 and Round 4 under SN 7931.Latest edition:For the second edition (August 2022), the Peruvian younger cohort household level data file (pe_r5_ychh_youngerhousehold) has been updated to include the mother's health variables. Main Topics: Older Cohort Household Questionnaire (age 22): includes sections on: Parental background; Household education; Livelihoods and asset framework; Economic changes and recent life history; Socio-economic status; Public Programmes.Older Cohort Child Questionnaire (age 22): includes sections on: Mobility; Subjective Wellbeing; Education; General Perceptions; Employment, earnings and time-use; Feelings and Attitudes; Household decision-making; Marital and Living Arrangements; Gender roles and social norms; Fertility; Health and Nutrition; Computer and other digital devices and internet use and skills; Social Capital; Anthropometry.Older Cohort Self-Administered Questionnaire (age 22): includes sections on: Relationship with parents, Smoking, Violence, Alcohol, Sexual behaviour (administered in Peru only).Younger Cohort Household Questionnaire (age 15): includes sections: on Parental background; Household education and time use; Livelihoods and asset framework; Consumption; Social Capital; Economic changes and recent life history; Socio-economic status, Health; Anthropometry (for the study child and a sibling); Caregiver perceptions and attitudes.Younger Cohort Child Questionnaire (age 15): includes sections on Mobility; Time use and work activities; Education and job aspirations; Health; Social norms and gender roles; social networking; Marriage and parenthood expectation; Feelings and Attitudes; Computer, other digital devices and internet usage; Anthropometry.Younger Cohort Cognitive Tests (age 15): include Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (administered to the study child and a sibling); Mathematics test; Reading comprehension test. In Ethiopia only an additional English and Amharic reading test.Community Questionnaire: (administered in the main communities where Young Lives children live) includes sections on: General characteristics of the locality; Social environment; Access to services; Economy; Local prices; Social protection; Educational services; Health services; Migration.Mini-community questionnaire: (administered in communities into which one or study children moved) includes sections on: General characteristics of the locality; Social environment; Access to Services; Economy; Local prices. Purposive selection/case studies Interview Self-administered questionnaire

  • English
    Authors: 
    Rey, D, Cranfield University; Holman, I, Cranfield University; Knox, J, Cranfield University;
    Publisher: UK Data Service

    The agricultural drought inventory for the UK is a subset of data from the UK Drought Inventory. It contains qualitative drought data related to UK agriculture based on an extensive review of two weekly farming magazines in the UK: Farmers Weekly and Farmers Guardian for the period 1975-2012. For creating this dataset, we focused on the major drought events in that period (1975-76, 1988-92, 1995-97, 2003-06 and 2010-12). The agricultural inventory contains a total of 2,209 references. The inventory follows a standard format (based on the European Drought Impact Report Inventory, EDII), common to the other sectoral collection of references, that allows their combination for drought analysis and characterisation. Thus, it stores information on the start and end dates of the event and their location (local and regional based on NUTS regions) to characterise the temporal and spatial extents of the cited event. The events/entries are categorised as drivers, impacts, responses and includes a sample of text from the source. Historic Droughts was a four year (2014-2018), £1.5m project funded by the UK Research Councils, aiming to develop a cross-disciplinary understanding of past drought episodes that have affected the United Kingdom (UK), with a view to developing improved tools for managing droughts in future. Drought and water scarcity (DWS) events are significant threats to livelihoods and wellbeing in many countries, including the United Kingdom (UK). Parts of the UK are already water-stressed and are facing a wide range of pressures, including an expanding population and intensifying exploitation of increasingly limited water resources. In addition, many regions may become significantly drier in future due to environmental changes, all of which implies major challenges to water resource management. However, DWS events are not simply natural hazards. There are also a range of socio-economic and regulatory factors that may influence the course of droughts, such as water consumption practices and abstraction licensing regimes. Consequently, if DWS events are to be better managed, there is a need for a more detailed understanding of the links between hydrometeorological and social systems during droughts. With this research gap in mind, the Historic Droughts project aimed to develop an interdisciplinary understanding of drought from a range of different perspectives. Based on an analysis of information from a wide range of sectors (hydrometeorological, environmental, agricultural, regulatory, social and cultural), the project characterised and quantified the history of drought and water scarcity events since the late 19th century. The Historic Droughts project involved eight institutions across the UK: the British Geological Survey the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Cranfield University, the University of Exeter, HR Wallingford, Lancaster University, the Met Office, and the University of Oxford. Extensive review of two weekly farming magazines in the UK: Farmers Weekly and Farmers Guardian for the period 1975-2012. From December 2003 onwards, the issues are in electronic format (in ProQuest, accessed via Cranfield University Library website). For items before 2004 (not available electronically), issues in paper format were consulted at the British Library (London). The search terms were: drought, dry weather/spell, rainfall/precipitation, soil moisture, water scarcity/stress/deficit. After all the references containing one or more of these terms were collected, the content was screening and only the relevant ones were included in the inventory (spreadsheet format).