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The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
20 Research products, page 1 of 2

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
  • Publications
  • Research software
  • Other research products
  • 2013-2022
  • Open Access
  • Article
  • 0509 other social sciences
  • European Commission
  • DE

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Małgorzata Kalbarczyk;
    Publisher: Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
    Project: EC | SHARE-COHESION (870628), EC | SHARE_M4 (261982), EC | SERISS (654221), EC | DASISH (283646), EC | SHARE_LEAP (227822), EC | SHARE-PREP (211909), EC | SSHOC (823782), EC | SHARE-DEV3 (676536)

    The aging of the population, coupled with increasing divorce and remarriage rates, are changing the structure of potential non-financial support for older parents. The purpose of this study was to examine support provided to parents aged 50+ in stepfamilies and to determine if the difference existed between help provided by natural children and stepchildren. The primary objective was to investigate whether blood ties were a significant determinant of the support if the quality of the relationship between the parent and a natural child or a stepchild was taken into account. The secondary objective was to answer the question to what extent the reciprocal exchange motive of support was observed in stepfamilies. The probability of non-financial support from children and stepchildren was estimated based on the sixth wave of the SHARE (Survey on Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe) database for European countries. Children in stepfamilies provided less non-financial help to parents than those in intact families. Stepchildren were less likely to be in stepparents’ social networks, and stepparents provided less help with childcare for grandchildren than they did to their biological children. Relationship closeness and looking after grandchildren increased the probability of non-financial support to older parents, regardless of whether the donor was a natural child or a stepchild.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Danilo Giglitto; Luigina Ciolfi; Wolfgang Bosswick;
    Countries: United Kingdom, Ireland
    Project: EC | CultureLabs (770158)

    This article explores the needs and expectations of migrant and refugee communities in several European countries in relation to communicating and sharing their intangible cultural heritage (ICH) practices, and of cultural and civic institutions that plan to support this. Based on two empirical studies, we report on the perspectives of cultural institutions, NGOs that are active in cultural work, and representatives of migrant and refugee communities. This work sheds some light on the complex relationship between migrant communities and institutions with regard to ICH, and identifies the gaps and differences between these perspectives so as to produce guidelines and recommendations on how to bridge grassroots’ interests in ICH and cultural institutions, as well as organisations engaged in cultural work with migrant and refugee communities. The overall goal is to address the under-representation and marginalisation of many migrant and refugee communities in cultural heritage participation, production, and safeguarding and to propose ways to activate the potential of ICH.

  • Publication . Article . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Conal McCarthy; Philipp Schorch; Nicholas Thomas;
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | IndiGen (803302)
  • Publication . Preprint . Article . Other literature type . 2021
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Simone Rebora; Peter Boot; Federico Pianzola; Brigitte Gasser; J. Berenike Herrmann; Maria Kraxenberger; Moniek M. Kuijpers; Gerhard Lauer; Piroska Lendvai; Thomas C. Messerli; +1 more
    Publisher: Oxford University Press (OUP)
    Countries: Germany, Netherlands, Italy
    Project: SNSF | Mining Goodreads: a text ... (183194), SNSF | Forschungslogiken in den ... (183221), SNSF | Geteiltes Lesen. Literatu... (183012), EC | READIT (792849)

    AbstractProminent among the social developments that the web 2.0 has facilitated is digital social reading (DSR): on many platforms there are functionalities for creating book reviews, ‘inline’ commenting on book texts, online story writing (often in the form of fanfiction), informal book discussions, book vlogs, and more. In this article, we argue that DSR offers unique possibilities for research into literature, reading, the impact of reading and literary communication. We also claim that in this context computational tools are especially relevant, making DSR a field particularly suitable for the application of Digital Humanities methods. We draw up an initial categorization of research aspects of DSR and briefly examine literature for each category. We distinguish between studies on DSR that use it as a lens to study wider processes of literary exchange as opposed to studies for which the DSR culture is a phenomenon interesting in its own right. Via seven examples of DSR research, we discuss the chosen approaches and their connection to research questions in literary studies.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Kun Sun; Haitao Liu; Wenxin Xiong;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | WIDE (742545)

    AbstractScientific writings, as one essential part of human culture, have evolved over centuries into their current form. Knowing how scientific writings evolved is particularly helpful in understanding how trends in scientific culture developed. It also allows us to better understand how scientific culture was interwoven with human culture generally. The availability of massive digitized texts and the progress in computational technologies today provide us with a convenient and credible way to discern the evolutionary patterns in scientific writings by examining the diachronic linguistic changes. The linguistic changes in scientific writings reflect the genre shifts that took place with historical changes in science and scientific writings. This study investigates a general evolutionary linguistic pattern in scientific writings. It does so by merging two credible computational methods: relative entropy; word-embedding concreteness and imageability. It thus creates a novel quantitative methodology and applies this to the examination of diachronic changes in the Philosophical Transactions of Royal Society (PTRS, 1665–1869). The data from two computational approaches can be well mapped to support the argument that this journal followed the evolutionary trend of increasing professionalization and specialization. But it also shows that language use in this journal was greatly influenced by historical events and other socio-cultural factors. This study, as a “culturomic” approach, demonstrates that the linguistic evolutionary patterns in scientific discourse have been interrupted by external factors even though this scientific discourse would likely have cumulatively developed into a professional and specialized genre. The approaches proposed by this study can make a great contribution to full-text analysis in scientometrics.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jonas van der Straeten;
    Project: EC | GLOBAL-HOT (742631)

    Central Asia is among the world regions that are least explored in terms of their history of technology. This essay reviews a wide array of academic literature that can serve as a base for historical research on technology and material culture in the region. It furthermore explores some of the most promising conceptual avenues for such an endeavor. The metaphor of a borderland, it argues, can be used beyond its geographical meaning to conceptualize the region's technological landscape. This landscape has been shaped by the coexistence of traditional artisanal practices and material cultures, the industrial and architectural legacies of Soviet rule as well as the region's recent reemergence as a hub between Russia, China, Europe, and the Middle East. Based on case studies from different disciplines, this essay therefore discusses technology's role in creating borderlands or territoriality, statehood, production, and everyday life in Central Asia.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Julia Moses;
    Country: United Kingdom
    Project: EC | MARDIV (707072)

    Intermarriage was a key site for testing politics of difference within the multicultural German Empire. Across the German states in the mid-nineteenth century, marriage between members of different religions frequently proved impossible. Until various civil marriage laws were introduced between the 1840s and 1870s, marriage remained within the remit of the church. As a consequence, marrying across confessional lines was rarely permitted. The implications were clear: marriage was seen as the embodiment of one’s culture – defined primarily in confessional (alongside socio-economic) terms, and it was also viewed as a key transmitter of culture by producing new generations of faithful observers of particular denominations. As a country divided between three confessions, religion in mid- to late nineteenth-century Germany proved an important aspect of difference within the new German nation state. By the end of the nineteenth century, following the introduction of civil marriage, mass waves of migration, the growth of urbanization and the expansion of the German overseas empire, the connotation of ‘mixed marriage’ in Germany appeared to have shifted. It remained a code for crossing confessional lines, but its resonance had changed. By the late nineteenth century, ‘mixed marriage’ had come to characterize another kind of cultural mixing as well: that between races, both at home within Germany and abroad within its colonies and diasporic outposts. And, between 1905 and 1912, ‘mixed marriage’ between Germans and ‘natives’ had been banned in German Southwest Africa, East Africa and Samoa. Why and how was intermarriage a flashpoint in debates on German identity politics at the turn of the twentieth century? As this article shows, intermarriage in the German Empire mattered to families, broader communities, and legislators because it was a pivotal means through which social groups formed, interacted and maintained boundaries at a time when visions of Germany were expanding.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Naftali Weinberger; Seamus Bradley;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
    Country: United Kingdom
    Project: EC | IPMRB (792292)

    Philosophical discussions of disagreement typically focus on cases in which the disagreeing agents are aware that they are disagreeing and can pinpoint the proposition that they are disagreeing about. Scientific disagreements are not, in general, like this. Here we consider several case studies of disagreements that do not concern first-order factual claims about the scientific domain in question, but rather boil down to disputes regarding methodology. In such cases, it is often difficult to identify the point of contention in the dispute. Philosophers of science have a useful role to play in pinpointing the source of such disagreements, but must resist the temptation to trace scientific debates to disputes over higher-level philosophical accounts.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Margo Bargheer; Andrea C. Bertino;
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | HIRMEOS (731102)

    Die Sonderstellung der Monografie im Spektrum des wissenschaftlichen Publizierens stellt den Aufbau von Open-Access-Publikationsmodellen in den Geistes- und Sozialwissenschaften (im englischen HSS) vor besondere Herausforderungen. Der Artikel stellt dar, wie das EU-Projekt HIRMEOS (High Integration of Research Monographs in the European Open Science infrastructure) diese Herausforderungen anpackt. Vorgestellt werden Ziele, Partner, Arbeitspakete und Arbeitsmethoden des Projekts sowie die wichtigsten technischen Spezifikationen der implementierten Dienste und Werkzeuge für digitale Monografien. The peculiar position of the monograph in the range of scholarly publishing presents specific challenges for the building of Open Access publication structures in the humanities and in the social sciences (HSS). The article shows how the EU project HIRMEOS (High Integration of Research Monographs in the European Open Science infrastructure) meets these challenges. Objectives, partners, work packages and working methods of the project, as well as the most important technical specifications of the implemented services and tools for digital monographs are presented here.

  • Publication . Article . Preprint . 2018
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nadia Boukhelifa; Michael Bryant; Natasa Bulatovic; Ivan Čukić; Jean-Daniel Fekete; Milica Knežević; Jörg Lehmann; David I. Stuart; Carsten Thiel;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: France, United Kingdom
    Project: EC | CENDARI (284432)

    International audience; The CENDARI infrastructure is a research-supporting platform designed to provide tools for transnational historical research, focusing on two topics: medieval culture and World War I. It exposes to the end users modern Web-based tools relying on a sophisticated infrastructure to collect, enrich, annotate, and search through large document corpora. Supporting researchers in their daily work is a novel concern for infrastructures. We describe how we gathered requirements through multiple methods to understand historians' needs and derive an abstract workflow to support them. We then outline the tools that we have built, tying their technical descriptions to the user requirements. The main tools are the note-taking environment and its faceted search capabilities; the data integration platform including the Data API, supporting semantic enrichment through entity recognition; and the environment supporting the software development processes throughout the project to keep both technical partners and researchers in the loop. The outcomes are technical together with new resources developed and gathered, and the research workflow that has been described and documented.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
20 Research products, page 1 of 2
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Małgorzata Kalbarczyk;
    Publisher: Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
    Project: EC | SHARE-COHESION (870628), EC | SHARE_M4 (261982), EC | SERISS (654221), EC | DASISH (283646), EC | SHARE_LEAP (227822), EC | SHARE-PREP (211909), EC | SSHOC (823782), EC | SHARE-DEV3 (676536)

    The aging of the population, coupled with increasing divorce and remarriage rates, are changing the structure of potential non-financial support for older parents. The purpose of this study was to examine support provided to parents aged 50+ in stepfamilies and to determine if the difference existed between help provided by natural children and stepchildren. The primary objective was to investigate whether blood ties were a significant determinant of the support if the quality of the relationship between the parent and a natural child or a stepchild was taken into account. The secondary objective was to answer the question to what extent the reciprocal exchange motive of support was observed in stepfamilies. The probability of non-financial support from children and stepchildren was estimated based on the sixth wave of the SHARE (Survey on Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe) database for European countries. Children in stepfamilies provided less non-financial help to parents than those in intact families. Stepchildren were less likely to be in stepparents’ social networks, and stepparents provided less help with childcare for grandchildren than they did to their biological children. Relationship closeness and looking after grandchildren increased the probability of non-financial support to older parents, regardless of whether the donor was a natural child or a stepchild.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Danilo Giglitto; Luigina Ciolfi; Wolfgang Bosswick;
    Countries: United Kingdom, Ireland
    Project: EC | CultureLabs (770158)

    This article explores the needs and expectations of migrant and refugee communities in several European countries in relation to communicating and sharing their intangible cultural heritage (ICH) practices, and of cultural and civic institutions that plan to support this. Based on two empirical studies, we report on the perspectives of cultural institutions, NGOs that are active in cultural work, and representatives of migrant and refugee communities. This work sheds some light on the complex relationship between migrant communities and institutions with regard to ICH, and identifies the gaps and differences between these perspectives so as to produce guidelines and recommendations on how to bridge grassroots’ interests in ICH and cultural institutions, as well as organisations engaged in cultural work with migrant and refugee communities. The overall goal is to address the under-representation and marginalisation of many migrant and refugee communities in cultural heritage participation, production, and safeguarding and to propose ways to activate the potential of ICH.

  • Publication . Article . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Conal McCarthy; Philipp Schorch; Nicholas Thomas;
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | IndiGen (803302)
  • Publication . Preprint . Article . Other literature type . 2021
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Simone Rebora; Peter Boot; Federico Pianzola; Brigitte Gasser; J. Berenike Herrmann; Maria Kraxenberger; Moniek M. Kuijpers; Gerhard Lauer; Piroska Lendvai; Thomas C. Messerli; +1 more
    Publisher: Oxford University Press (OUP)
    Countries: Germany, Netherlands, Italy
    Project: SNSF | Mining Goodreads: a text ... (183194), SNSF | Forschungslogiken in den ... (183221), SNSF | Geteiltes Lesen. Literatu... (183012), EC | READIT (792849)

    AbstractProminent among the social developments that the web 2.0 has facilitated is digital social reading (DSR): on many platforms there are functionalities for creating book reviews, ‘inline’ commenting on book texts, online story writing (often in the form of fanfiction), informal book discussions, book vlogs, and more. In this article, we argue that DSR offers unique possibilities for research into literature, reading, the impact of reading and literary communication. We also claim that in this context computational tools are especially relevant, making DSR a field particularly suitable for the application of Digital Humanities methods. We draw up an initial categorization of research aspects of DSR and briefly examine literature for each category. We distinguish between studies on DSR that use it as a lens to study wider processes of literary exchange as opposed to studies for which the DSR culture is a phenomenon interesting in its own right. Via seven examples of DSR research, we discuss the chosen approaches and their connection to research questions in literary studies.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Kun Sun; Haitao Liu; Wenxin Xiong;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | WIDE (742545)

    AbstractScientific writings, as one essential part of human culture, have evolved over centuries into their current form. Knowing how scientific writings evolved is particularly helpful in understanding how trends in scientific culture developed. It also allows us to better understand how scientific culture was interwoven with human culture generally. The availability of massive digitized texts and the progress in computational technologies today provide us with a convenient and credible way to discern the evolutionary patterns in scientific writings by examining the diachronic linguistic changes. The linguistic changes in scientific writings reflect the genre shifts that took place with historical changes in science and scientific writings. This study investigates a general evolutionary linguistic pattern in scientific writings. It does so by merging two credible computational methods: relative entropy; word-embedding concreteness and imageability. It thus creates a novel quantitative methodology and applies this to the examination of diachronic changes in the Philosophical Transactions of Royal Society (PTRS, 1665–1869). The data from two computational approaches can be well mapped to support the argument that this journal followed the evolutionary trend of increasing professionalization and specialization. But it also shows that language use in this journal was greatly influenced by historical events and other socio-cultural factors. This study, as a “culturomic” approach, demonstrates that the linguistic evolutionary patterns in scientific discourse have been interrupted by external factors even though this scientific discourse would likely have cumulatively developed into a professional and specialized genre. The approaches proposed by this study can make a great contribution to full-text analysis in scientometrics.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jonas van der Straeten;
    Project: EC | GLOBAL-HOT (742631)

    Central Asia is among the world regions that are least explored in terms of their history of technology. This essay reviews a wide array of academic literature that can serve as a base for historical research on technology and material culture in the region. It furthermore explores some of the most promising conceptual avenues for such an endeavor. The metaphor of a borderland, it argues, can be used beyond its geographical meaning to conceptualize the region's technological landscape. This landscape has been shaped by the coexistence of traditional artisanal practices and material cultures, the industrial and architectural legacies of Soviet rule as well as the region's recent reemergence as a hub between Russia, China, Europe, and the Middle East. Based on case studies from different disciplines, this essay therefore discusses technology's role in creating borderlands or territoriality, statehood, production, and everyday life in Central Asia.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Julia Moses;
    Country: United Kingdom
    Project: EC | MARDIV (707072)

    Intermarriage was a key site for testing politics of difference within the multicultural German Empire. Across the German states in the mid-nineteenth century, marriage between members of different religions frequently proved impossible. Until various civil marriage laws were introduced between the 1840s and 1870s, marriage remained within the remit of the church. As a consequence, marrying across confessional lines was rarely permitted. The implications were clear: marriage was seen as the embodiment of one’s culture – defined primarily in confessional (alongside socio-economic) terms, and it was also viewed as a key transmitter of culture by producing new generations of faithful observers of particular denominations. As a country divided between three confessions, religion in mid- to late nineteenth-century Germany proved an important aspect of difference within the new German nation state. By the end of the nineteenth century, following the introduction of civil marriage, mass waves of migration, the growth of urbanization and the expansion of the German overseas empire, the connotation of ‘mixed marriage’ in Germany appeared to have shifted. It remained a code for crossing confessional lines, but its resonance had changed. By the late nineteenth century, ‘mixed marriage’ had come to characterize another kind of cultural mixing as well: that between races, both at home within Germany and abroad within its colonies and diasporic outposts. And, between 1905 and 1912, ‘mixed marriage’ between Germans and ‘natives’ had been banned in German Southwest Africa, East Africa and Samoa. Why and how was intermarriage a flashpoint in debates on German identity politics at the turn of the twentieth century? As this article shows, intermarriage in the German Empire mattered to families, broader communities, and legislators because it was a pivotal means through which social groups formed, interacted and maintained boundaries at a time when visions of Germany were expanding.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Naftali Weinberger; Seamus Bradley;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
    Country: United Kingdom
    Project: EC | IPMRB (792292)

    Philosophical discussions of disagreement typically focus on cases in which the disagreeing agents are aware that they are disagreeing and can pinpoint the proposition that they are disagreeing about. Scientific disagreements are not, in general, like this. Here we consider several case studies of disagreements that do not concern first-order factual claims about the scientific domain in question, but rather boil down to disputes regarding methodology. In such cases, it is often difficult to identify the point of contention in the dispute. Philosophers of science have a useful role to play in pinpointing the source of such disagreements, but must resist the temptation to trace scientific debates to disputes over higher-level philosophical accounts.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Margo Bargheer; Andrea C. Bertino;
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | HIRMEOS (731102)

    Die Sonderstellung der Monografie im Spektrum des wissenschaftlichen Publizierens stellt den Aufbau von Open-Access-Publikationsmodellen in den Geistes- und Sozialwissenschaften (im englischen HSS) vor besondere Herausforderungen. Der Artikel stellt dar, wie das EU-Projekt HIRMEOS (High Integration of Research Monographs in the European Open Science infrastructure) diese Herausforderungen anpackt. Vorgestellt werden Ziele, Partner, Arbeitspakete und Arbeitsmethoden des Projekts sowie die wichtigsten technischen Spezifikationen der implementierten Dienste und Werkzeuge für digitale Monografien. The peculiar position of the monograph in the range of scholarly publishing presents specific challenges for the building of Open Access publication structures in the humanities and in the social sciences (HSS). The article shows how the EU project HIRMEOS (High Integration of Research Monographs in the European Open Science infrastructure) meets these challenges. Objectives, partners, work packages and working methods of the project, as well as the most important technical specifications of the implemented services and tools for digital monographs are presented here.

  • Publication . Article . Preprint . 2018
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nadia Boukhelifa; Michael Bryant; Natasa Bulatovic; Ivan Čukić; Jean-Daniel Fekete; Milica Knežević; Jörg Lehmann; David I. Stuart; Carsten Thiel;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: France, United Kingdom
    Project: EC | CENDARI (284432)

    International audience; The CENDARI infrastructure is a research-supporting platform designed to provide tools for transnational historical research, focusing on two topics: medieval culture and World War I. It exposes to the end users modern Web-based tools relying on a sophisticated infrastructure to collect, enrich, annotate, and search through large document corpora. Supporting researchers in their daily work is a novel concern for infrastructures. We describe how we gathered requirements through multiple methods to understand historians' needs and derive an abstract workflow to support them. We then outline the tools that we have built, tying their technical descriptions to the user requirements. The main tools are the note-taking environment and its faceted search capabilities; the data integration platform including the Data API, supporting semantic enrichment through entity recognition; and the environment supporting the software development processes throughout the project to keep both technical partners and researchers in the loop. The outcomes are technical together with new resources developed and gathered, and the research workflow that has been described and documented.