Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
10 Research products, page 1 of 1

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
  • Publications
  • Research software
  • Other research products
  • Article
  • 0501 psychology and cognitive sciences
  • European Commission
  • EU
  • English
  • ZENODO

Relevance
arrow_drop_down
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Enora Gandon; Tetsushi Nonaka; Raphael Sonabend; John Endler;
    Project: EC | SKILL (793451), EC | SKILL (793451)

    Studies have documented that traditional motor skills (i.e. motor habits) are part of the cultural way of life that characterises each society. Yet, it is still unclear to what extent motor skills are inherited through culture. Drawing on ethnology and motor behaviour, we addressed this issue through a detailed description of traditional pottery skills. Our goal was to quantify the influence of three kinds of constraints: the transcultural constraints of wheelthrowing, the cultural constraints induced via cultural transmission, and the potters’ individual constraints. Five expert Nepalese potters were invited to produce three familiar pottery types, each in five specimens. A total of 31 different fashioning hand positions were identified. Most of them (14) were cross-cultural, ten positions were cultural, five positions were individual, and two positions were unique. Statistical tests indicated that the subset of positions used by the participants in this study were distinct from those of other cultural groups. Behaviours described in terms of fashioning duration, number of gestures, and hand position repertoires size highlighted both individual and cross-cultural traits. We also analysed the time series of the successive hand positions used throughout the fashioning of each vessel. Results showed, for each pottery type, strong reproducible sequences at the individual level and a clearly higher level of variability between potters. Overall, our findings confirm the existence of a cultural transmission in craft skills but also demonstrated that the skill is not fully determined by a cultural marking. We conclude that the influence of culture on craft skills should not be overstated, even if its role is significant given the fact that it reflects the socially transmitted part of the skill. Such research offers insights into archaeological problems in providing a representative view of how cultural constraints influence the motor skills implied in artefact manufacturing.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kun Sun; R. Harald Baayen;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | WIDE (742545), EC | WIDE (742545)

    Abstract Hyphenated compounds have largely been neglected in the studies of compounding, which have seldom analysed compounds in context. In this study, we argue that the hyphen use in compounds is strongly motivated. Hyphenation is used when words form a unit, which reduces the possibility of parsing them into separate units or other forms. The current study adopts a new perspective on contextual factors, namely, which part of speech (PoS) the compound as a whole belongs to and how people correctly parse a compound into a unit. This process can be observed and analysed by considering examples. This study therefore holds that hyphenation might have gradually become a compounding technique that differs from general compounding principles. To better understand hyphenated compounds and the motivation for using hyphenation, we conduct a quantitative investigation into their distribution frequency to explore how English hyphenated compounds have been used in over the last 200 years. Diachronic change in the frequency of the distribution for compounds has seldom been considered. This question is explored by using frequency data obtained from the three databases that contain hyphenated compounds. Diachronic analysis shows that the frequencies of tokens and types in hyphenated compounds have been increasing, and changes in both frequencies follow the S-curve model. Historical evidence shows that hyphenation in compounds, as an orthographic form, does not seem to disappear easily. Familiarity and economy, as suggested in the cognitive studies of compounding, cannot adequately explain this phenomenon. The three databases that we used provide cross-verification that suggests that hyphenation has evolved into a compounding technique. Language users probably unconsciously take advantage of the discriminative learning model to remind themselves that these combinations should be parsed differently. Thus the hyphenation compounding technique facilitates communication efficiency. Overall, this study significantly enhances our understanding of the nature of compounding, the motivations for using hyphenation, and its cognitive processing.

  • Publication . Conference object . Preprint . Article . Part of book or chapter of book . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Matej Ulčar; Marko Robnik-Šikonja;
    Project: EC | EMBEDDIA (825153), EC | EMBEDDIA (825153)

    Large pretrained masked language models have become state-of-the-art solutions for many NLP problems. The research has been mostly focused on English language, though. While massively multilingual models exist, studies have shown that monolingual models produce much better results. We train two trilingual BERT-like models, one for Finnish, Estonian, and English, the other for Croatian, Slovenian, and English. We evaluate their performance on several downstream tasks, NER, POS-tagging, and dependency parsing, using the multilingual BERT and XLM-R as baselines. The newly created FinEst BERT and CroSloEngual BERT improve the results on all tasks in most monolingual and cross-lingual situations 10 pages, accepted at TSD 2020 conference

  • Publication . Other literature type . Article . Presentation . 2019
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Salgado, A.; Costa, R.; Tasovac, T.;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | ELEXIS (731015), EC | ELEXIS (731015)

    This paper analyzes the application of usage labels in three representative lexicographic works, namely the Portuguese, Spanish, and French Academy Dictionaries as a starting point for creating a consistent classification of usage labels and their encoding in accordance with TEI Lex-0. The use of labels is not always entirely consistent within individual dictionaries and even less so across different lexicographic projects. This makes the tasks of accurately classifying and encoding them quite difficult. This difficulty is compounded by the differences and partial incompatibilities found in the lexicographic literature on the treatment of diasystemic information. We address the existing literature and the initial classification of TEI Lex-0, and argue for the need to introduce some changes to TEI Lex-0, most notably in terms of diatextual labels. Finally, we argue that the existing classifications based on examples rather than on clear and explicit definitions of classification categories will always lack in precision and lead to mutually incompatible encodings of different dictionaries. We propose a set of definitions for usage label categories that can be adopted by TEI Lex-0 and used in other similar attempts to create interoperable lexical resources. An agreement on usage label categories is a first and necessary step before proceeding in the direction of harmonizing and standardizing the actual values of usage labels across various dictionaries and across different languages.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gülşen Eryiğit; Cihat Eryiğit; Serpil Karabüklü; Meltem Kelepir; Aslı Özkul; Tuğba Pamay; Dilara Torunoğlu-Selamet; Hatice Kose;
    Project: EC | SIGN-HUB (693349), EC | SIGN-HUB (693349)

    This article describes the procedures employed during the development of the first comprehensive machine-readable Turkish Sign Language (TiD) resource: a bilingual lexical database and a parallel corpus between Turkish and TiD. In addition to sign language specific annotations (such as non-manual markers, classifiers and buoys) following the recently introduced TiD knowledge representation (Eryiğit et al. 2016), the parallel corpus contains also annotations of dependency relations, which makes it the first parallel treebank between a sign language and an auditory-vocal language.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Irene Buselli; Luca Oneto; Carlo Dambra; Christian Eduardo Verdonk Gallego; Miguel García Martínez; Anthony Smoker; Nnenna Ike; Tamara Pejovic; Patricia Ruiz Martino;
    Publisher: F1000 Research Limited
    Country: Sweden
    Project: EC | FARO (892542), EC | FARO (892542)

    Background: The air traffic management (ATM) system has historically coped with a global increase in traffic demand ultimately leading to increased operational complexity. When dealing with the impact of this increasing complexity on system safety it is crucial to automatically analyse the losses of separation (LoSs) using tools able to extract meaningful and actionable information from safety reports. Current research in this field mainly exploits natural language processing (NLP) to categorise the reports,with the limitations that the considered categories need to be manually annotated by experts and that general taxonomies are seldom exploited. Methods: To address the current gaps,authors propose to perform exploratory data analysis on safety reports combining state-of-the-art techniques like topic modelling and clustering and then to develop an algorithm able to extract the Toolkit for ATM Occurrence Investigation (TOKAI) taxonomy factors from the free-text safety reports based on syntactic analysis. TOKAI is a tool for investigation developed by EUROCONTROL and its taxonomy is intended to become a standard and harmonised approach to future investigations. Results: Leveraging on the LoS events reported in the public databases of the Comisión de Estudio y Análisis de Notificaciones de Incidentes de Tránsito Aéreo and the United Kingdom Airprox Board,authors show how their proposal is able to automatically extract meaningful and actionable information from safety reports,other than to classify their content according to the TOKAI taxonomy. The quality of the approach is also indirectly validated by checking the connection between the identified factors and the main contributor of the incidents. Conclusions: Authors' results are a promising first step toward the full automation of a general analysis of LoS reports supported by results on real-world data coming from two different sources. In the future,authors' proposal could be extended to other taxonomies or tailored to identify factors to be included in the safety taxonomies.

  • Publication . Article . Other literature type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Robert Lieck; Fabian C. Moss; Martin Rohrmeier;
    Publisher: Ubiquity Press
    Country: Switzerland
    Project: EC | PMSB (760081), EC | PMSB (760081)

    Pitch-class distributions are of central relevance in music information retrieval, computational musicology and various other fields, such as music perception and cognition. However, despite their structure being closely related to the cognitively and musically relevant properties of a piece, many existing approaches treat pitch-class distributions as fixed templates. In this paper, we introduce the Tonal Diffusion Model, which provides a more structured and interpretable statistical model of pitch-class distributions by incorporating geometric and algebraic structures known from music theory as well as insights from music cognition. Our model explains the pitch-class distributions of musical pieces by assuming tones to be generated through a latent cognitive process on the Tonnetz, a well-established representation for harmonic relations. Specifically, we assume that all tones in a piece are generated by taking a sequence of interval steps on the Tonnetz starting from a unique tonal origin. We provide a description in terms of a Bayesian generative model and show how the latent variables and parameters can be efficiently inferred. The model is quantitatively evaluated on a corpus of 248 pieces from the Baroque, Classical, and Romantic era and describes the empirical pitch-class distributions more accurately than conventional template-based models. On three concrete musical examples, we demonstrate that our model captures relevant harmonic characteristics of the pieces in a compact and interpretable way, also reflecting stylistic aspects of the respective epoch. Paper with appendix

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Stéphanie Bertrand; Stéphanie Bertrand; Martha Vassiliadi; Paul Zikas; Efstratios Geronikolakis; George Papagiannakis; George Papagiannakis;
    Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
    Project: EC | UViMCA (893454), EC | UViMCA (893454)

    The primary mission of cultural institutions, including heritage sites and museums, is to perform and perpetuate Cultural Heritage (CH) by ideally transforming audiences into stewards of that heritage. In recent years, these institutions have increasingly turned to Mixed Reality (MR) technologies to expand and democratize public access to Cultural Heritage - a trend that is called upon to accelerate with COVID-19 - because these technologies provide opportunities for more remote outreach, and moreover, can make partial remains or ruins more relatable to the public. But as emerging evaluations indicate, existing MR intangible and tangible Digital Cultural Heritage (DCH) applications are largely proving inadequate to engaging audiences beyond an initial fascination with the immersive 3D visualization of heritage sites and artefacts owing in part to misguided storytelling or non-compelling narratives. They fail to effectively communicate the significance of Cultural Heritage to audiences and impress upon them its value in a lasting way due to their overreliance on an education-entertainment-touristic consumption paradigm. Building on the recent case made for Literature-based MR Presence, this article examines how the literary tradition of travel narratives can be recruited to enhance presence and embodiment, and further elicit aesthetic experiences in Digital Cultural Heritage applications by drawing on recent findings from the fields of Extended Reality (XR), cognitive literary science and new museology. The projected effects of this innovative approach are not limited to an increase in audience engagement on account of a greater sense of presence and embodiment. This approach is also expected to prompt a different kind of public involvement characterized by a personal valuation of the heritage owing to aesthetic experience. As the paper ultimately discusses, this response is more compatible both with MR applications' default mode of usership, and with newly emerging conceptions of a user-centered museum (e.g., the Museum 3.0), thereby providing a narrative roadmap for future Virtual Museum (VM) applications better suited to the primary mission of transmitting and perpetuating Cultural Heritage. © Bertrand, Vassiliadi, Zikas, Geronikolakis and Papagiannakis.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Yu Ying Chuang; Marie Lenka Vollmer; Elnaz Shafaei-Bajestan; Susanne Gahl; Peter Hendrix; R. Harald Baayen;
    Publisher: Springer US
    Project: EC | WIDE (742545), EC | WIDE (742545)

    Pseudowords have long served as key tools in psycholinguistic investigations of the lexicon. A common assumption underlying the use of pseudowords is that they are devoid of meaning: Comparing words and pseudowords may then shed light on how meaningful linguistic elements are processed differently from meaningless sound strings. However, pseudowords may in fact carry meaning. On the basis of a computational model of lexical processing, linear discriminative learning (LDL Baayen et al., Complexity, 2019, 1–39, 2019), we compute numeric vectors representing the semantics of pseudowords. We demonstrate that quantitative measures gauging the semantic neighborhoods of pseudowords predict reaction times in the Massive Auditory Lexical Decision (MALD) database (Tucker et al., 2018). We also show that the model successfully predicts the acoustic durations of pseudowords. Importantly, model predictions hinge on the hypothesis that the mechanisms underlying speech production and comprehension interact. Thus, pseudowords emerge as an outstanding tool for gauging the resonance between production and comprehension. Many pseudowords in the MALD database contain inflectional suffixes. Unlike many contemporary models, LDL captures the semantic commonalities of forms sharing inflectional exponents without using the linguistic construct of morphemes. We discuss methodological and theoretical implications for models of lexical processing and morphological theory. The results of this study, complementing those on real words reported in Baayen et al., (Complexity, 2019, 1–39, 2019), thus provide further evidence for the usefulness of LDL both as a cognitive model of the mental lexicon, and as a tool for generating new quantitative measures that are predictive for human lexical processing.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rob Boddice;
    Publisher: Universidad de los Andes
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | IDEM (742470), EC | IDEM (742470)

    This article briefly appraises the state of the art in the history of emotions, looking to its theoretical and methodological underpinnings and some of the notable scholarship in the contemporary field. The predominant focus, however, lies on the future direction of the history of emotions, based on a convergence of the humanities and neurosciences, and according to important observations about the biocultural status of human beings. While the article stops short of exhorting historians to become competent neuroscientists themselves, it does demand that historians of emotions take note of the implications of social neuroscientific research in particular, with a view to capturing the potential of the emotions to unlock the history of experience, and with a mind to unlocking the political importance of work in this area, namely, the shifting ground of what it means —how it feels— to be human.