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25 Research products, page 1 of 3

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
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  • Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO)

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  • English
    Authors: 
    United States Department Of Education. National Center For Education Statistics;
    Publisher: ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research
    Project: NWO | Learning More from Empiri... (2300130468)

    This data collection provides the second wave of data in a longitudinal, multi-cohort study of American youth conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) on behalf of the National Center for Education Statistics. The first wave of data was collected in 1980 (ICPSR 7896) and the third wave was collected in 1984 (ICPSR 8443). Student identification numbers included in each record permit data from these surveys to be merged with other High School and Beyond files. The base-year (1980) study incorporated student data from both cohorts into one file. Due to the more complex design of the First Follow-Up and a resulting increase in the volume of available data, separate files have been created for the two cohorts. The sophomore cohort portion of this collection replicates nearly all of the types of data gathered in the base-year study (ICPSR 7896), including students' behavior and experiences in the secondary school setting, outside employment, educational and occupational aspirations and expectations, personal and family background, and personal attitudes and beliefs. Also, the same cognitive test was administered in the base-year and follow-up surveys. The senior cohort portion, in contrast, emphasizes postsecondary education and work experiences. Education data include the amount and type of school completed, school financing, aspirations, and non-school training. Information is also provided on labor force participation and aspirations, military service, and financial status. The senior cohort did not take the cognitive test for the follow-up survey. Both cohorts provide demographic data such as age, race, sex, and ethnic background. The Transcripts Survey provides information on individual students such as the type of high school program, the student's grade point average, attendance, class rank and size, and participation in special education programs, plus course-oriented data such as the year a course was taken, the type of course, credit earned, and grades received. The Offerings and Enrollments Survey file contains data on each school in the sample and include variables such as size and type of institution, type of schedule used, ethnic composition of the faculty and student body, busing, types of programs and specific courses offered, school facilities, number of handicapped students, and school staffing. In addition, information is provided on academic and disciplinary policies, and perceived problems in the school. The Local Labor Market Indicators file contains economic and labor market data for the geographical area of each school in the sample, given both by county and by Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. The School Questionnaire file incorporates data elements from both the Base-Year School Questionnaire and the First Follow-up School Questionnaire, along with other information from sampling files, into a single record for each school. Topics include institutional characteristics such as total enrollment, average daily attendance rates, dropout rates, remedial programs, provisions for handicapped and disadvantaged students, participation in federal programs, teacher retention and absenteeism, per-pupil expenditures, school rules and policies, and ownership and funding of nonpublic schools. The base-year High School and Beyond Survey (ICPSR 7896) used a stratified, disproportionate probability sample of 1,122 schools selected from a sampling frame of 24,725 high schools. Within each school, 36 seniors and 36 sophomores were randomly chosen. For the First Follow-Up, the National Opinion Research Center attempted to survey all 1980 sophomores and a subsample of 1980 seniors who participated in the base-year survey. Supplementary questionnaires were utilized for those 1980 sophomores who were not currently attending any school, had transferred to other schools, or had graduated early. The Transcripts Survey includes every secondary-school course taken by a sub-sample of the sophomore cohort. The Course Offerings and Enrollments Survey contains data from schools that were selected as first-stage sample units (clusters) for the sampling of students in the base-year survey, and in which sophomore High School and Beyond students were actively enrolled during the 1981-1982 academic year. For the Local Labor Market Indicators file, economic variables were derived from data provided by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Bureau of Economic Analysis. For the School Questionnaire file, follow-up data were requested from all base-year schools that were still in existence as independent institutions and that had members of the 1980 sophomore cohort currently enrolled. Follow-up data were not collected from schools that had closed, merged with other schools, or had no 10th or 12th grade students during the base year, nor from schools to which students transferred as individuals. However, in 17 instances students from a base-year school were transferred en masse to a new school, and school questionnaires were sought from these new schools. These 17 schools do not have weights as their selection probabilities are unknown. Datasets: DS0: Study-Level Files DS1: Sophomore Cohort First Follow-Up Data DS2: SAS Control Cards for Sophomore First Follow-up Data DS3: User's Manual for Sophomore First Follow-up Data DS4: Senior Cohort First Follow-Up Data DS5: SAS Control Cards for Senior First Follow-up Data DS6: Sophomore Cohort Transcripts Survey Data DS7: Sophomore Cohort Transcripts Survey CSSC Codes DS8: Sophomore Cohort Transcripts Survey SPSS Cards for Record Sophomore Cohort Type 1 DS9: Sophomore Cohort Transcripts Survey SPSS Cards for Record Sophomore Cohort Type 2 DS10: Sophomore Cohort Transcripts Survey SAS Control Cards DS11: Course Offerings and Enrollments Data DS12: Course Offerings and Enrollments CSSC Codes DS13: Course Offerings and Enrollments SPSS Cards for Record Type 1 DS14: Course Offerings and Enrollments SPSS Cards for Record Type 2 DS15: Local Labor Market Indicators Data DS16: Local Labor Market Indicators SAS Control Cards DS17: School Questionnaire Data DS18: SAS Control Cards for School Questionnaire Data There are two distinct types of records in the Transcripts and the Offerings and Enrollments files: for each case, there is a Type 1 record that contains information for a single student or school. Immediately following each Type 1 record are one or more Type 2 records, each of which provides data on a single course taken by the student or offered by the school. Because the number of courses may vary, the length of the combined Type 2 records varies as well. Therefore these two files are written in variable blocked format. In both of these files the total number of records greatly exceeds the number of cases: the Transcripts file has a total of 471,330 records, and the Offerings and Enrollments file has 142,290 records. The universe for this collection consists of all persons in the United States who were high school sophomores or seniors in 1980. High School and Beyond (HS&B) Series

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    van Zuijlen, Mitchell; Pont, S.C. (Sylvia); Wijntjes, M.W.A. (Maarten);
    Publisher: 4TU.Centre for Research Data
    Country: Netherlands
    Project: NWO | Visual communication of m... (26743)

    A collection of around 11.000 painted faces, from 6 galleries, and a datafile with statistics for each face. Each face is present as a crop from the original painting, a crop with the background removed and a crop with the background, eyes and mouth removed.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lauretano, Vittoria; Littler, Kate; Polling, M; Zachos, James C; Lourens, Lucas Joost;
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Project: NWO | Evolution of astronomical... (5600)

    Recent studies have shown that the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO) was preceded by a series of short-lived global warming events, known as hyperthermals. Here we present high-resolution benthic stable carbon and oxygen isotope records from ODP Sites 1262 and 1263 (Walvis Ridge, SE Atlantic) between ~54 and ~52 million years ago, tightly constraining the character, timing, and magnitude of six prominent hyperthermal events. These events, which include Eocene Thermal Maximum (ETM) 2 and 3, are studied in relation to orbital forcing and long-term trends. Our findings reveal an almost linear relationship between d13C and d18O for all these hyperthermals, indicating that the eccentricity-paced co-variance between deep-sea temperature changes and extreme perturbations in the exogenic carbon pool persisted during these events towards the onset of the EECO, in accord with previous observations for the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) and ETM2. The covariance of d13C and d18O during H2 and I2, which are the second pulses of the "paired" hyperthermal events ETM2-H2 and I1-I2, deviates with respect to the other events. We hypothesize that this could relate to a relatively higher contribution of an isotopically heavier source of carbon, such as peat or permafrost, and/or to climate feedbacks/local changes in circulation. Finally, the d18O records of the two sites show a systematic offset with on average 0.2 per mil heavier values for the shallower Site 1263, which we link to a slightly heavier isotopic composition of the intermediate water mass reaching the northeastern flank of the Walvis Ridge compared to that of the deeper northwestern water mass at Site 1262.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    van Zuijlen, Mitchell; Lin, Hubert; Bala, Kavita; Pont, S.C. (Sylvia); Wijntjes, M.W.A. (Maarten);
    Country: Netherlands
    Project: NWO | Visual communication of m... (26743)

    Materials In Paintings (MIP): An interdisciplinary dataset for perception, art history, and computer vision.Download the README.txt first to help you decide what you want/need to download!In this dataset, we capture the painterly depictions of materials to enable the study of depiction and perception of materials through the artists' eye. We annotated a dataset of 19k paintings with 200k+ bounding boxes from which polygon segments were automatically extracted. Each bounding box was assigned a coarse label (e.g., fabric) and a fine-grained label (e.g., velvety, silky).Note that the data can be browed and explored on https://materialsinpaintings.tudelft.nl. If you only want to download a few paintings, using that website might be faster.

  • Other research product . 2017
    Open Access Czech
    Authors: 
    Kocour, Matěj;
    Publisher: Západočeská univerzita v Plzni
    Country: Czech Republic
    Project: NWO | Towards inline 2D surface... (12750)

    Práce se věnuje vzniku, průběhu a důsledkům čtyř posloupných válek v Africe na Zlatonosném pobřeží. Ve válkách se zajímavě kloubily zájmy afrických království a obchodní rivalita evropských států v regionu, jmenovitě Anglie a Spojených provincií. Práce války popisuje hlavně z evropské perspektivy, a zároveň je v jejím rámci i celkově popsaná koexistence Evropanů, žijících v pevnostech na pobřeží Guinejského zálivu a domorodých Afričanů, způsob, jakým se Evropané v Africe angažovali a fungování místní politiky domorodých států a evropských obchodních společností. Obhájeno The thesis follows the origin, the course and the consequences of four successive wars in Africa on the Gold Coast. In these wars, there an interesting intertwining of local African polities and trading rivalry of European states in the region, namely England and United provinces. The thesis describes the wars mainly from European perspective, and within its frameworks, it also describes the general coexistence of Europeans, living on the trading forts in Guinea bay and native Africans, the way how Europeans engaged themselves in Africa and the way local politics and politics of the European trading companies worked.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sluijs, Appy; Bijl, Peter K; Schouten, Stefan; Röhl, Ursula; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Brinkhuis, Henk;
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Project: EC | DINOPRO (259627), NWO | Biotic, climatic and geoc... (2300137050)

    A brief (~150 kyr) period of widespread global average surface warming marks the transition between the Paleocene and Eocene epochs, ~56 million years ago. This so-called "Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum" (PETM) is associated with the massive injection of 13C-depleted carbon, reflected in a negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE). Biotic responses include a global abundance peak (acme) of the subtropical dinoflagellate Apectodinium. Here we identify the PETM in a marine sedimentary sequence deposited on the East Tasman Plateau at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1172 and show, based on the organic paleothermometer TEX86, that southwest Pacific sea surface temperatures increased from ~26 °C to ~33°C during the PETM. Such temperatures before, during and after the PETM are >10 °C warmer than predicted by paleoclimate model simulations for this latitude. In part, this discrepancy may be explained by potential seasonal biases in the TEX86 proxy in polar oceans. Additionally, the data suggest that not only Arctic, but also Antarctic temperatures may be underestimated in simulations of ancient greenhouse climates by current generation fully coupled climate models. An early influx of abundant Apectodinium confirms that environmental change preceded the CIE on a global scale. Organic dinoflagellate cyst assemblages suggest a local decrease in the amount of river run off reaching the core site during the PETM, possibly in concert with eustatic rise. Moreover, the assemblages suggest changes in seasonality of the regional hydrological system and storm activity. Finally, significant variation in dinoflagellate cyst assemblages during the PETM indicates that southwest Pacific climates varied significantly over time scales of 103 - 104 years during this event, a finding comparable to similar studies of PETM successions from the New Jersey Shelf.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    van Nieukerken, Erik J.; Gilrein, Daniel Owen; Eiseman, Charles S.;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: NWO | GRMHD simulations of thin... (27728)

    Specimen data of Stigmellamultispicata and other Ulmus mining Nepticulidae : Explanation note: The 288 records are the records of specimens examined and records obtained from online sources, of the taxa treated in this paper and supplement the presented Material examined.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Salabarnada, Ariadna; Escutia, Carlota; Röhl, Ursula; Nelson, C Hans; McKay, Robert M; Jiménez-Espejo, Francisco Jose; Bijl, Peter K; Hartman, Julian D; Ikehara, Minoru; Strother, Stephanie L; +6 more
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Project: NWO | The Dawn of a Greenhouse ... (10684), NWO | Reconstructing the the ev... (7456)

    Antarctic ice sheet and Southern Ocean paleoceanographic configurations during the late Oligocene are not well resolved. They are however important to understand the influence of high-latitude Southern Hemisphere feedbacks on global climate under CO2 scenarios (between 400 and 750 ppm) projected by the IPCC for this century, assuming unabated CO2 emissions. Sediments recovered by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) at Site U1356, offshore of the Wilkes Land margin in East Antarctica, provide an opportunity to study ice sheet and paleoceanographic configurations during the late Oligocene (26-25 Ma). Our study, based on a combination of sediment facies analysis, magnetic susceptibility, density, and X-Ray Fluorescence geochemical data, shows that glacial and interglacial sediments are continuously reworked by bottom-currents, with maximum velocities occurring during the interglacial periods. Glacial sediments record poorly ventilated, low-oxygenation bottom water conditions, interpreted to result from a northward shift of westerly winds and surface oceanic fronts. Interglacial sediments record more oxygenated and ventilated bottom water conditions and strong current velocities, which suggests enhanced mixing of the water masses as a result of a southward shift of the Polar Front. Intervals with preserved carbonated nannofossils within some of the interglacial facies are interpreted to form under warmer paleoclimatic conditions when less corrosive warmer northern component water (e.g. North Atlantic sourced deep water) had a greater influence on the Site. Spectral analysis on the late Oligocene sediment interval show that the glacial-interglacial cyclicity and related displacements of the Southern Ocean frontal systems between 26-25 Ma were forced mainly by obliquity. The paucity of iceberg rafted debris (IRD) throughout the studied interval contrasts with earlier Oligocene and post-Miocene Climate Optimum sections from Site U1356 and with late Oligocene strata from the Ross Sea, which contain IRD and evidence for coastal glaciers and sea ice. These observations, supported by elevated sea surface paleotemperatures, the absence of sea-ice, and reconstructions of fossil pollen between 26 and 25 Ma at Site U1356, suggest that open ocean water conditions prevailed. Combined, these evidences suggest that glaciers or ice caps likely occupied the topographic highs and lowlands of the now marine Wilkes Subglacial Basin (WSB). Unlike today, the continental shelf was not over-deepened and thus ice sheets in the WSB were likely land-based and marine-based ice sheet expansion was likely limited to coastal regions. Supplement to: Salabarnada, Ariadna; Escutia, Carlota; Röhl, Ursula; Nelson, C Hans; McKay, Robert M; Jiménez-Espejo, Francisco Jose; Bijl, Peter K; Hartman, Julian D; Strother, Stephanie L; Salzmann, Ulrich; Evangelinos, Dimitris; López-Quirós, Adrián; Flores, José Abel; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Ikehara, Minoru; Brinkhuis, Henk (2018): Paleoceanography and ice sheet variability offshore Wilkes Land, Antarctica – Part 1: Insights from late Oligocene astronomically paced contourite sedimentation. Climate of the Past, 14(7), 991-1014

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Agnieszka Płonka;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: NWO | Full waveform inversion f... (8807)

    This dataset should provide complete synthetic seismograms and software (python tools for random media generation, signal comparison and histogram stacking) that were used in the publication: Płonka, A., Blom, N., and Fichtner, A.: The imprint of crustal density heterogeneities on regional seismic wave propagation, Solid Earth, 7, 1591-1608, doi:10.5194/se-7-1591-2016, 2016.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Warden, Lisa; Moros, Matthias; Neumann, Thomas; Shennan, Ian; Timpson, Adrian; Manning, Katie; Sollai, Martina; Wacker, Lukas; Perner, Kerstin; Häusler, Katharina; +8 more
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Project: NWO | MaMaLoc: Magnetic Marker ... (27140)

    The transition from hunter-gatherer-fisher groups to agrarian societies is arguably the most significant change in human prehistory. In the European plain there is evidence for fully developed agrarian societies by 7,500 cal. yr BP, yet a well-established agrarian society does not appear in the north until 6,000 cal. yr BP for unknown reasons. Here we show a sudden increase in summer temperature at 6,000 cal. yr BP in northern Europe using a well-dated, high resolution record of sea surface temperature (SST) from the Baltic Sea. This temperature rise resulted in hypoxic conditions across the entire Baltic sea as revealed by multiple sedimentary records and supported by marine ecosystem modeling. Comparison with summed probability distributions of radiocarbon dates from archaeological sites indicate that this temperature rise coincided with both the introduction of farming, and a dramatic population increase. The evidence supports the hypothesis that the boundary of farming rapidly extended north at 6,000 cal. yr BP because terrestrial conditions in a previously marginal region improved.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
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Include:
The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
25 Research products, page 1 of 3
  • English
    Authors: 
    United States Department Of Education. National Center For Education Statistics;
    Publisher: ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research
    Project: NWO | Learning More from Empiri... (2300130468)

    This data collection provides the second wave of data in a longitudinal, multi-cohort study of American youth conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) on behalf of the National Center for Education Statistics. The first wave of data was collected in 1980 (ICPSR 7896) and the third wave was collected in 1984 (ICPSR 8443). Student identification numbers included in each record permit data from these surveys to be merged with other High School and Beyond files. The base-year (1980) study incorporated student data from both cohorts into one file. Due to the more complex design of the First Follow-Up and a resulting increase in the volume of available data, separate files have been created for the two cohorts. The sophomore cohort portion of this collection replicates nearly all of the types of data gathered in the base-year study (ICPSR 7896), including students' behavior and experiences in the secondary school setting, outside employment, educational and occupational aspirations and expectations, personal and family background, and personal attitudes and beliefs. Also, the same cognitive test was administered in the base-year and follow-up surveys. The senior cohort portion, in contrast, emphasizes postsecondary education and work experiences. Education data include the amount and type of school completed, school financing, aspirations, and non-school training. Information is also provided on labor force participation and aspirations, military service, and financial status. The senior cohort did not take the cognitive test for the follow-up survey. Both cohorts provide demographic data such as age, race, sex, and ethnic background. The Transcripts Survey provides information on individual students such as the type of high school program, the student's grade point average, attendance, class rank and size, and participation in special education programs, plus course-oriented data such as the year a course was taken, the type of course, credit earned, and grades received. The Offerings and Enrollments Survey file contains data on each school in the sample and include variables such as size and type of institution, type of schedule used, ethnic composition of the faculty and student body, busing, types of programs and specific courses offered, school facilities, number of handicapped students, and school staffing. In addition, information is provided on academic and disciplinary policies, and perceived problems in the school. The Local Labor Market Indicators file contains economic and labor market data for the geographical area of each school in the sample, given both by county and by Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. The School Questionnaire file incorporates data elements from both the Base-Year School Questionnaire and the First Follow-up School Questionnaire, along with other information from sampling files, into a single record for each school. Topics include institutional characteristics such as total enrollment, average daily attendance rates, dropout rates, remedial programs, provisions for handicapped and disadvantaged students, participation in federal programs, teacher retention and absenteeism, per-pupil expenditures, school rules and policies, and ownership and funding of nonpublic schools. The base-year High School and Beyond Survey (ICPSR 7896) used a stratified, disproportionate probability sample of 1,122 schools selected from a sampling frame of 24,725 high schools. Within each school, 36 seniors and 36 sophomores were randomly chosen. For the First Follow-Up, the National Opinion Research Center attempted to survey all 1980 sophomores and a subsample of 1980 seniors who participated in the base-year survey. Supplementary questionnaires were utilized for those 1980 sophomores who were not currently attending any school, had transferred to other schools, or had graduated early. The Transcripts Survey includes every secondary-school course taken by a sub-sample of the sophomore cohort. The Course Offerings and Enrollments Survey contains data from schools that were selected as first-stage sample units (clusters) for the sampling of students in the base-year survey, and in which sophomore High School and Beyond students were actively enrolled during the 1981-1982 academic year. For the Local Labor Market Indicators file, economic variables were derived from data provided by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Bureau of Economic Analysis. For the School Questionnaire file, follow-up data were requested from all base-year schools that were still in existence as independent institutions and that had members of the 1980 sophomore cohort currently enrolled. Follow-up data were not collected from schools that had closed, merged with other schools, or had no 10th or 12th grade students during the base year, nor from schools to which students transferred as individuals. However, in 17 instances students from a base-year school were transferred en masse to a new school, and school questionnaires were sought from these new schools. These 17 schools do not have weights as their selection probabilities are unknown. Datasets: DS0: Study-Level Files DS1: Sophomore Cohort First Follow-Up Data DS2: SAS Control Cards for Sophomore First Follow-up Data DS3: User's Manual for Sophomore First Follow-up Data DS4: Senior Cohort First Follow-Up Data DS5: SAS Control Cards for Senior First Follow-up Data DS6: Sophomore Cohort Transcripts Survey Data DS7: Sophomore Cohort Transcripts Survey CSSC Codes DS8: Sophomore Cohort Transcripts Survey SPSS Cards for Record Sophomore Cohort Type 1 DS9: Sophomore Cohort Transcripts Survey SPSS Cards for Record Sophomore Cohort Type 2 DS10: Sophomore Cohort Transcripts Survey SAS Control Cards DS11: Course Offerings and Enrollments Data DS12: Course Offerings and Enrollments CSSC Codes DS13: Course Offerings and Enrollments SPSS Cards for Record Type 1 DS14: Course Offerings and Enrollments SPSS Cards for Record Type 2 DS15: Local Labor Market Indicators Data DS16: Local Labor Market Indicators SAS Control Cards DS17: School Questionnaire Data DS18: SAS Control Cards for School Questionnaire Data There are two distinct types of records in the Transcripts and the Offerings and Enrollments files: for each case, there is a Type 1 record that contains information for a single student or school. Immediately following each Type 1 record are one or more Type 2 records, each of which provides data on a single course taken by the student or offered by the school. Because the number of courses may vary, the length of the combined Type 2 records varies as well. Therefore these two files are written in variable blocked format. In both of these files the total number of records greatly exceeds the number of cases: the Transcripts file has a total of 471,330 records, and the Offerings and Enrollments file has 142,290 records. The universe for this collection consists of all persons in the United States who were high school sophomores or seniors in 1980. High School and Beyond (HS&B) Series

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    van Zuijlen, Mitchell; Pont, S.C. (Sylvia); Wijntjes, M.W.A. (Maarten);
    Publisher: 4TU.Centre for Research Data
    Country: Netherlands
    Project: NWO | Visual communication of m... (26743)

    A collection of around 11.000 painted faces, from 6 galleries, and a datafile with statistics for each face. Each face is present as a crop from the original painting, a crop with the background removed and a crop with the background, eyes and mouth removed.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lauretano, Vittoria; Littler, Kate; Polling, M; Zachos, James C; Lourens, Lucas Joost;
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Project: NWO | Evolution of astronomical... (5600)

    Recent studies have shown that the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO) was preceded by a series of short-lived global warming events, known as hyperthermals. Here we present high-resolution benthic stable carbon and oxygen isotope records from ODP Sites 1262 and 1263 (Walvis Ridge, SE Atlantic) between ~54 and ~52 million years ago, tightly constraining the character, timing, and magnitude of six prominent hyperthermal events. These events, which include Eocene Thermal Maximum (ETM) 2 and 3, are studied in relation to orbital forcing and long-term trends. Our findings reveal an almost linear relationship between d13C and d18O for all these hyperthermals, indicating that the eccentricity-paced co-variance between deep-sea temperature changes and extreme perturbations in the exogenic carbon pool persisted during these events towards the onset of the EECO, in accord with previous observations for the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) and ETM2. The covariance of d13C and d18O during H2 and I2, which are the second pulses of the "paired" hyperthermal events ETM2-H2 and I1-I2, deviates with respect to the other events. We hypothesize that this could relate to a relatively higher contribution of an isotopically heavier source of carbon, such as peat or permafrost, and/or to climate feedbacks/local changes in circulation. Finally, the d18O records of the two sites show a systematic offset with on average 0.2 per mil heavier values for the shallower Site 1263, which we link to a slightly heavier isotopic composition of the intermediate water mass reaching the northeastern flank of the Walvis Ridge compared to that of the deeper northwestern water mass at Site 1262.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    van Zuijlen, Mitchell; Lin, Hubert; Bala, Kavita; Pont, S.C. (Sylvia); Wijntjes, M.W.A. (Maarten);
    Country: Netherlands
    Project: NWO | Visual communication of m... (26743)

    Materials In Paintings (MIP): An interdisciplinary dataset for perception, art history, and computer vision.Download the README.txt first to help you decide what you want/need to download!In this dataset, we capture the painterly depictions of materials to enable the study of depiction and perception of materials through the artists' eye. We annotated a dataset of 19k paintings with 200k+ bounding boxes from which polygon segments were automatically extracted. Each bounding box was assigned a coarse label (e.g., fabric) and a fine-grained label (e.g., velvety, silky).Note that the data can be browed and explored on https://materialsinpaintings.tudelft.nl. If you only want to download a few paintings, using that website might be faster.

  • Other research product . 2017
    Open Access Czech
    Authors: 
    Kocour, Matěj;
    Publisher: Západočeská univerzita v Plzni
    Country: Czech Republic
    Project: NWO | Towards inline 2D surface... (12750)

    Práce se věnuje vzniku, průběhu a důsledkům čtyř posloupných válek v Africe na Zlatonosném pobřeží. Ve válkách se zajímavě kloubily zájmy afrických království a obchodní rivalita evropských států v regionu, jmenovitě Anglie a Spojených provincií. Práce války popisuje hlavně z evropské perspektivy, a zároveň je v jejím rámci i celkově popsaná koexistence Evropanů, žijících v pevnostech na pobřeží Guinejského zálivu a domorodých Afričanů, způsob, jakým se Evropané v Africe angažovali a fungování místní politiky domorodých států a evropských obchodních společností. Obhájeno The thesis follows the origin, the course and the consequences of four successive wars in Africa on the Gold Coast. In these wars, there an interesting intertwining of local African polities and trading rivalry of European states in the region, namely England and United provinces. The thesis describes the wars mainly from European perspective, and within its frameworks, it also describes the general coexistence of Europeans, living on the trading forts in Guinea bay and native Africans, the way how Europeans engaged themselves in Africa and the way local politics and politics of the European trading companies worked.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sluijs, Appy; Bijl, Peter K; Schouten, Stefan; Röhl, Ursula; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Brinkhuis, Henk;
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Project: EC | DINOPRO (259627), NWO | Biotic, climatic and geoc... (2300137050)

    A brief (~150 kyr) period of widespread global average surface warming marks the transition between the Paleocene and Eocene epochs, ~56 million years ago. This so-called "Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum" (PETM) is associated with the massive injection of 13C-depleted carbon, reflected in a negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE). Biotic responses include a global abundance peak (acme) of the subtropical dinoflagellate Apectodinium. Here we identify the PETM in a marine sedimentary sequence deposited on the East Tasman Plateau at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1172 and show, based on the organic paleothermometer TEX86, that southwest Pacific sea surface temperatures increased from ~26 °C to ~33°C during the PETM. Such temperatures before, during and after the PETM are >10 °C warmer than predicted by paleoclimate model simulations for this latitude. In part, this discrepancy may be explained by potential seasonal biases in the TEX86 proxy in polar oceans. Additionally, the data suggest that not only Arctic, but also Antarctic temperatures may be underestimated in simulations of ancient greenhouse climates by current generation fully coupled climate models. An early influx of abundant Apectodinium confirms that environmental change preceded the CIE on a global scale. Organic dinoflagellate cyst assemblages suggest a local decrease in the amount of river run off reaching the core site during the PETM, possibly in concert with eustatic rise. Moreover, the assemblages suggest changes in seasonality of the regional hydrological system and storm activity. Finally, significant variation in dinoflagellate cyst assemblages during the PETM indicates that southwest Pacific climates varied significantly over time scales of 103 - 104 years during this event, a finding comparable to similar studies of PETM successions from the New Jersey Shelf.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    van Nieukerken, Erik J.; Gilrein, Daniel Owen; Eiseman, Charles S.;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: NWO | GRMHD simulations of thin... (27728)

    Specimen data of Stigmellamultispicata and other Ulmus mining Nepticulidae : Explanation note: The 288 records are the records of specimens examined and records obtained from online sources, of the taxa treated in this paper and supplement the presented Material examined.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Salabarnada, Ariadna; Escutia, Carlota; Röhl, Ursula; Nelson, C Hans; McKay, Robert M; Jiménez-Espejo, Francisco Jose; Bijl, Peter K; Hartman, Julian D; Ikehara, Minoru; Strother, Stephanie L; +6 more
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Project: NWO | The Dawn of a Greenhouse ... (10684), NWO | Reconstructing the the ev... (7456)

    Antarctic ice sheet and Southern Ocean paleoceanographic configurations during the late Oligocene are not well resolved. They are however important to understand the influence of high-latitude Southern Hemisphere feedbacks on global climate under CO2 scenarios (between 400 and 750 ppm) projected by the IPCC for this century, assuming unabated CO2 emissions. Sediments recovered by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) at Site U1356, offshore of the Wilkes Land margin in East Antarctica, provide an opportunity to study ice sheet and paleoceanographic configurations during the late Oligocene (26-25 Ma). Our study, based on a combination of sediment facies analysis, magnetic susceptibility, density, and X-Ray Fluorescence geochemical data, shows that glacial and interglacial sediments are continuously reworked by bottom-currents, with maximum velocities occurring during the interglacial periods. Glacial sediments record poorly ventilated, low-oxygenation bottom water conditions, interpreted to result from a northward shift of westerly winds and surface oceanic fronts. Interglacial sediments record more oxygenated and ventilated bottom water conditions and strong current velocities, which suggests enhanced mixing of the water masses as a result of a southward shift of the Polar Front. Intervals with preserved carbonated nannofossils within some of the interglacial facies are interpreted to form under warmer paleoclimatic conditions when less corrosive warmer northern component water (e.g. North Atlantic sourced deep water) had a greater influence on the Site. Spectral analysis on the late Oligocene sediment interval show that the glacial-interglacial cyclicity and related displacements of the Southern Ocean frontal systems between 26-25 Ma were forced mainly by obliquity. The paucity of iceberg rafted debris (IRD) throughout the studied interval contrasts with earlier Oligocene and post-Miocene Climate Optimum sections from Site U1356 and with late Oligocene strata from the Ross Sea, which contain IRD and evidence for coastal glaciers and sea ice. These observations, supported by elevated sea surface paleotemperatures, the absence of sea-ice, and reconstructions of fossil pollen between 26 and 25 Ma at Site U1356, suggest that open ocean water conditions prevailed. Combined, these evidences suggest that glaciers or ice caps likely occupied the topographic highs and lowlands of the now marine Wilkes Subglacial Basin (WSB). Unlike today, the continental shelf was not over-deepened and thus ice sheets in the WSB were likely land-based and marine-based ice sheet expansion was likely limited to coastal regions. Supplement to: Salabarnada, Ariadna; Escutia, Carlota; Röhl, Ursula; Nelson, C Hans; McKay, Robert M; Jiménez-Espejo, Francisco Jose; Bijl, Peter K; Hartman, Julian D; Strother, Stephanie L; Salzmann, Ulrich; Evangelinos, Dimitris; López-Quirós, Adrián; Flores, José Abel; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Ikehara, Minoru; Brinkhuis, Henk (2018): Paleoceanography and ice sheet variability offshore Wilkes Land, Antarctica – Part 1: Insights from late Oligocene astronomically paced contourite sedimentation. Climate of the Past, 14(7), 991-1014

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Agnieszka Płonka;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: NWO | Full waveform inversion f... (8807)

    This dataset should provide complete synthetic seismograms and software (python tools for random media generation, signal comparison and histogram stacking) that were used in the publication: Płonka, A., Blom, N., and Fichtner, A.: The imprint of crustal density heterogeneities on regional seismic wave propagation, Solid Earth, 7, 1591-1608, doi:10.5194/se-7-1591-2016, 2016.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Warden, Lisa; Moros, Matthias; Neumann, Thomas; Shennan, Ian; Timpson, Adrian; Manning, Katie; Sollai, Martina; Wacker, Lukas; Perner, Kerstin; Häusler, Katharina; +8 more
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Project: NWO | MaMaLoc: Magnetic Marker ... (27140)

    The transition from hunter-gatherer-fisher groups to agrarian societies is arguably the most significant change in human prehistory. In the European plain there is evidence for fully developed agrarian societies by 7,500 cal. yr BP, yet a well-established agrarian society does not appear in the north until 6,000 cal. yr BP for unknown reasons. Here we show a sudden increase in summer temperature at 6,000 cal. yr BP in northern Europe using a well-dated, high resolution record of sea surface temperature (SST) from the Baltic Sea. This temperature rise resulted in hypoxic conditions across the entire Baltic sea as revealed by multiple sedimentary records and supported by marine ecosystem modeling. Comparison with summed probability distributions of radiocarbon dates from archaeological sites indicate that this temperature rise coincided with both the introduction of farming, and a dramatic population increase. The evidence supports the hypothesis that the boundary of farming rapidly extended north at 6,000 cal. yr BP because terrestrial conditions in a previously marginal region improved.