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2,285 Research products, page 1 of 229

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  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Publisher: Sarajevo : INSAM Institute for Contemporary Artistic Music
    Country: Serbia

    The Editorial Board of the INSAM Journal of Contemporary Music, Art and Technology decided that both issues of 2022 will be dedicated to one main theme, namely, “Fighting for the attention: Music and art on social media”. We can say that this call for papers went very successfully, as we are now presenting to you INSAM Journal No. 9. In a year which has seen many grave turbulences on socio-economic and political levels on a global scale, we have once again confirmed the importance of social media for communication and the spreading of news, and we have also seen the limitations of these tools. Turning to music and art on social media, our Main Theme section consists of five intriguing papers, Beyond the Main Theme section has two articles, (Inter)Views bring three exciting pieces, and the Reviews one festival report.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Athanassopoulos, Effie;
    Publisher: Universität Tübingen
    Country: Germany

    This paper explores the link between archaeology and the digital humanities, especially the adoption of 3D modeling technology, which is becoming an integral part of archaeological practice. Here we present a case study, a sample of 3D models from a large collection of well-preserved medieval ceramics from the excavations of the Sanctuary of Zeus at Nemea, Greece. This growing digital collection can illustrate the advantages, potential, and challenges presented by the incorporation of 3D technology into archaeological practice. 3D modeling technology can facilitate documentation, interpretation, and publication of archaeological datasets. However, the longevity of these datasets remains uncertain and require extensive dialogue and collaboration, as storage space requirements, support of current digital infrastructure, and long-term data accessibility and preservation are matters that do not have standardized solutions. More effort needs to be invested in preserving these large datasets before 3D modeling can become fully incorporated into archaeological practice.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Meadows, Lucas;
    Country: Canada

    This study begins with a discussion regarding the military crises of third and early fourth century Roman Empire and how they appear to have missed Sicily entirely, resulting in the island entering a period of prosperity, especially in the rural regions. The direct link between the establishment of Constantinople as capital of the Empire and Sicily’s subsequent economic boom is also examined. Within this historical context, the relationship between the mosaics of North Africa and those of Sicily begins with a survey of the richly-decorated Villa Romana del Casale near modern-day Piazza Armerina. The extensive collections of mosaics adorning this villa are examined in depth and grouped thematically. Finally, comparisons of the motifs, and the methodologies used for creating these mosaics are made with similar, and in some cases even identical works found in North Africa, especially around Carthage. From this, it can be determined that not only were the mosaics of Piazza Armerina influenced by North African design, but they may have even been made by North African mosaicists themselves.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Angela Petrillo; Valeria Catanese; Serena Micheletti;
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | CLIC (776758)

    Il flyer presenta le attività dell'Historic Urban Landscape Workshop svoltosi i a Salerno il 26-27 novembre 2018. Il prodotto, sviluppato includendo gli elementi fondamentali della Visual Identity del progetto e nel rispetto degli obblighi di dissemination e communication previsti dall'Annotated Model Grant Agreement, dettaglia le presentazioni di best practices di riuso adattivo del patrimonio culturale italiano presso la Fondazione EBRIS di Salerno.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sousa, Carlos A Mendes;
    Publisher: PANGAEA

    Data tables containing macroscopic facies description of subsurface data acquisition campaigns carried out in the Ria Formosa: 1) 41 manual holes with an Eijkelkamp Auger (code RFM); 2) 5 mechanical bores per roto-percussion with a 6t mobile drilling rig (code RF). The manual boreholes were photographed and described in situ, registering stratigraphy, colour, textural class, sedimentary structures, visible organic matter, and presence of bioclasts. The drilling depth oscillated between 1.55m and 8.6m. Mechanical boreholes were recovered and analysed in laboratory, described as the manual boreholes. Drilling depth oscillated between and between 11m and 26.5m. The boreholes were sampled, on average, every 0.6m (mechanical, in the laboratory) and 0.8m (manual, in the field). Selected samples were used for carbon-14 dating, and for textural and micropalaeontological analysis. Table is an export output of subsurface dataset created with Rockworks15. Borehole location is in decimal Lat. Long. WGS84 Datum. Data is published as part of the SIHER research project (PTDC/CTE-GIX112236/2009).

  • English
    Authors: 
    Office for National Statistics;
    Publisher: UK Data Service

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.BackgroundThe Labour Force Survey (LFS) is a unique source of information using international definitions of employment and unemployment and economic inactivity, together with a wide range of related topics such as occupation, training, hours of work and personal characteristics of household members aged 16 years and over. It is used to inform social, economic and employment policy. The LFS was first conducted biennially from 1973-1983. Between 1984 and 1991 the survey was carried out annually and consisted of a quarterly survey conducted throughout the year and a 'boost' survey in the spring quarter (data were then collected seasonally). From 1992 quarterly data were made available, with a quarterly sample size approximately equivalent to that of the previous annual data. The survey then became known as the Quarterly Labour Force Survey (QLFS). From December 1994, data gathering for Northern Ireland moved to a full quarterly cycle to match the rest of the country, so the QLFS then covered the whole of the UK (though some additional annual Northern Ireland LFS datasets are also held at the UK Data Archive). Further information on the background to the QLFS may be found in the documentation.Household datasetsUp to 2015, the LFS household datasets were produced twice a year (April-June and October-December) from the corresponding quarter's individual-level data. From January 2015 onwards, they are now produced each quarter alongside the main QLFS. The household datasets include all the usual variables found in the individual-level datasets, with the exception of those relating to income, and are intended to facilitate the analysis of the economic activity patterns of whole households. It is recommended that the existing individual-level LFS datasets continue to be used for any analysis at individual level, and that the LFS household datasets be used for analysis involving household or family-level data. From January 2011, a pseudonymised household identifier variable (HSERIALP) is also included in the main quarterly LFS dataset instead.Change to coding of missing values for household seriesFrom 1996-2013, all missing values in the household datasets were set to one '-10' category instead of the separate '-8' and '-9' categories. For that period, the ONS introduced a new imputation process for the LFS household datasets and it was necessary to code the missing values into one new combined category ('-10'), to avoid over-complication. This was also in line with the Annual Population Survey household series of the time. The change was applied to the back series during 2010 to ensure continuity for analytical purposes. From 2013 onwards, the -8 and -9 categories have been reinstated.LFS DocumentationThe documentation available from the Archive to accompany LFS datasets largely consists of the latest version of each volume alongside the appropriate questionnaire for the year concerned. However, LFS volumes are updated periodically by ONS, so users are advised to check the ONS LFS User Guidance page before commencing analysis.Additional data derived from the QLFSThe Archive also holds further QLFS series: End User Licence (EUL) quarterly datasets; Secure Access datasets (see below); two-quarter and five-quarter longitudinal datasets; quarterly, annual and ad hoc module datasets compiled for Eurostat; and some additional annual Northern Ireland datasets.End User Licence and Secure Access QLFS Household datasetsUsers should note that there are two discrete versions of the QLFS household datasets. One is available under the standard End User Licence (EUL) agreement, and the other is a Secure Access version. Secure Access household datasets for the QLFS are available from 2009 onwards, and include additional, detailed variables not included in the standard EUL versions. Extra variables that typically can be found in the Secure Access versions but not in the EUL versions relate to: geography; date of birth, including day; education and training; household and family characteristics; employment; unemployment and job hunting; accidents at work and work-related health problems; nationality, national identity and country of birth; occurrence of learning difficulty or disability; and benefits. For full details of variables included, see data dictionary documentation. The Secure Access version (see SN 7674) has more restrictive access conditions than those made available under the standard EUL. Prospective users will need to gain ONS Accredited Researcher status, complete an extra application form and demonstrate to the data owners exactly why they need access to the additional variables. Users are strongly advised to first obtain the standard EUL version of the data to see if they are sufficient for their research requirements.Changes to variables in QLFS Household EUL datasetsIn order to further protect respondent confidentiality, ONS have made some changes to variables available in the EUL datasets. From July-September 2015 onwards, 4-digit industry class is available for main job only, meaning that 3-digit industry group is the most detailed level available for second and last job.Review of imputation methods for LFS Household data - changes to missing valuesA review of the imputation methods used in LFS Household and Family analysis resulted in a change from the January-March 2015 quarter onwards. It was no longer considered appropriate to impute any personal characteristic variables (e.g. religion, ethnicity, country of birth, nationality, national identity, etc.) using the LFS donor imputation method. This method is primarily focused to ensure the 'economic status' of all individuals within a household is known, allowing analysis of the combined economic status of households. This means that from 2015 larger amounts of missing values ('-8'/-9') will be present in the data for these personal characteristic variables than before. Therefore if users need to carry out any time series analysis of households/families which also includes personal characteristic variables covering this time period, then it is advised to filter off 'ioutcome=3' cases from all periods to remove this inconsistent treatment of non-responders. Occupation data for 2021 and 2022 data filesThe ONS have identified an issue with the collection of some occupational data in 2021 and 2022 data files in a number of their surveys. While they estimate any impacts will be small overall, this will affect the accuracy of the breakdowns of some detailed (four-digit Standard Occupational Classification (SOC)) occupations, and data derived from them. None of ONS' headline statistics, other than those directly sourced from occupational data, are affected and you can continue to rely on their accuracy. For further information on this issue, please see: https://www.ons.gov.uk/news/statementsandletters/occupationaldatainonssurveys. Main Topics:The LFS household datasets cover:characteristics of the household: number of people of working age; number of people over working age; number of children aged 0 to 4; number of children aged 5 to 15; number of dependent children (i.e. those in full-time education) aged 16 to 18economic activity in the household: number of people in employment; number of people in full-time employment; number of people in part-time employment; unemployed; economically inactive; students; sick or disabled; economically inactive but would like to work and are not seeking work because they do not believe there is work available ('discouraged workers'); care of dependants Compilation/Synthesis

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Pilarczyk-Palaitis, Anna Ewa;
    Publisher: Toruń : Nicolaus Copernicus University
    Country: Lithuania

    The last century of Lithuanian history and the resulting dynamics of political and demographic change have radically transformed the role, meaning and forms of interpretation of Polish heritage in Lithuania. The purpose of the article is to observe the main directions of changes taking place within the cultural memory of Poles living in Lithuania – the largest national minority group in Lithuania. The report presents the processes of changing topicality of Polish heritage in Lithuania in three main areas of active cultural memory: history, art and religion. The first area is represented by objects related to Józef Piłsudski, the second one by the Pohulanka Theatre (now the Russian Drama Theatre) in Vilnius and objects related to Adam Mickiewicz, and the third one by objects related to the cult of Divine Mercy. The article analyses official communication of these memory objects (published by the objects’ owners or official managers) as well as memory practices and rituals carried out in these objects and described on social media and in news articles published in Lithuania in 2017–2019. Observing various types of storage media, in this case, some selected objects of cultural heritage and rituals and texts accompanying them, it is possible to notice processes of variability, exchange, erasing, redefining memory and hence the dynamics of changes in the Polish collective identity in modern Lithuania. The analysis of the formal ritualization and communication of these objects has enabled noticing several interesting trends, above all an occurrence of the phenomenon of polylogue of narratives and the process of universalization of Polish heritage in Lithuania and thus Lithuanian and Polish collective memory approaching each other. The following analysis is valuable as a starting point for reflection on the transformation of the ethnic identity of Poles in Lithuania. [...]

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rafter, Patrick A; Herguera, Juan-Carlos; Southon, John R;
    Publisher: PANGAEA

    For over a decade, oceanographers have debated the interpretation and reliability of sediment microfossil records indicating extremely low seawater radiocarbon (14C) during the last deglaciation-observations that suggest a major disruption in marine carbon cycling coincident with rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Possible flaws in these records include poor age model controls, utilization of mixed, infaunal foraminifera species possibly influenced by changing porewater chemistry, and bioturbation. We have addressed these concerns using a glacial-interglacial record of epifaunal benthic foraminifera 14C on an ideal sedimentary age model (wood calibrated to atmosphere 14C). Our results affirm – with important caveats – the fidelity of these microfossil archives and confirm previous observations of highly depleted seawater 14C at intermediate depths in the deglacial northeast Pacific

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Peng, Tianxin;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    This MA thesis traces how “ethnic Koreans” in northeastern China (chaoxianzu) reshaped their perception(s) of “ethnicity” over the course of the great political and social upheavals from Manchukuo to the People’s Republic of China. By looking into less-explored memoirs and oral histories, this research is interested in dissecting the interrelations between memory-formation and ethnic imagination. Chapter 1 lays the theoretical groundwork for my memory-centered approach, through which I historicize the ethnic Koreans’ conceptualization(s) of “ethnicity” as a process, rather than a self-evident precondition. Chapter 2 reveals the ethnic Koreans’ ambiguous and fluid sense of ethnicity under Manchukuo’s ideology of minzu xiehe (concordia of ethnos). Chapter 3 examines the cultural construction of “Korean ethnicity” advocated by the Chinese Communist Party during the Chinese civil war. Chapter 4 investigates the contestations between the Party-state’s revolutionary narrative and the bottom-up ethnic discourse in the early socialist era. This thesis argues that memory comes to be a mediator reifying the fluid, contingent, and sometimes-contested process of ethnic imagination in between the boundaries of nation-states.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    September, Aramis;
    Country: Finland

    The purpose of this thesis was to analyse representations of the horse in art history and examine ways in which representations of the horse could be used to posit new positive representations of power. The theoretical section explored the lineage of horse imagery in art history; this section also explored power imagery as well. The portrayal of the horse in Western art was analysed from the Renaissance onwards in order to have a firm historical understanding. From this base of understanding, the potential for new image creation was discussed. Paintings and statues were the primary focus of the thesis for its analysis. Possibilities for new and more positive images of power were explored through visuals featuring horses. The analysis suggested that because of the horse’s roots in art history as well as its powerful physical strength, status as a prey animal, and its gentle sensitivity, the horse was an image eminently suited for use in positing new and positive non-toxic images of power. Further, the analysis suggested that these new explorations stand in opposition to power images and power conceptualisations based in toxic masculinity and patriarchy. This contrast of new imagery and socially constructed expectations provided the starting point for critiquing current power imagery and moving beyond toxic imagery.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
2,285 Research products, page 1 of 229
  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Publisher: Sarajevo : INSAM Institute for Contemporary Artistic Music
    Country: Serbia

    The Editorial Board of the INSAM Journal of Contemporary Music, Art and Technology decided that both issues of 2022 will be dedicated to one main theme, namely, “Fighting for the attention: Music and art on social media”. We can say that this call for papers went very successfully, as we are now presenting to you INSAM Journal No. 9. In a year which has seen many grave turbulences on socio-economic and political levels on a global scale, we have once again confirmed the importance of social media for communication and the spreading of news, and we have also seen the limitations of these tools. Turning to music and art on social media, our Main Theme section consists of five intriguing papers, Beyond the Main Theme section has two articles, (Inter)Views bring three exciting pieces, and the Reviews one festival report.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Athanassopoulos, Effie;
    Publisher: Universität Tübingen
    Country: Germany

    This paper explores the link between archaeology and the digital humanities, especially the adoption of 3D modeling technology, which is becoming an integral part of archaeological practice. Here we present a case study, a sample of 3D models from a large collection of well-preserved medieval ceramics from the excavations of the Sanctuary of Zeus at Nemea, Greece. This growing digital collection can illustrate the advantages, potential, and challenges presented by the incorporation of 3D technology into archaeological practice. 3D modeling technology can facilitate documentation, interpretation, and publication of archaeological datasets. However, the longevity of these datasets remains uncertain and require extensive dialogue and collaboration, as storage space requirements, support of current digital infrastructure, and long-term data accessibility and preservation are matters that do not have standardized solutions. More effort needs to be invested in preserving these large datasets before 3D modeling can become fully incorporated into archaeological practice.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Meadows, Lucas;
    Country: Canada

    This study begins with a discussion regarding the military crises of third and early fourth century Roman Empire and how they appear to have missed Sicily entirely, resulting in the island entering a period of prosperity, especially in the rural regions. The direct link between the establishment of Constantinople as capital of the Empire and Sicily’s subsequent economic boom is also examined. Within this historical context, the relationship between the mosaics of North Africa and those of Sicily begins with a survey of the richly-decorated Villa Romana del Casale near modern-day Piazza Armerina. The extensive collections of mosaics adorning this villa are examined in depth and grouped thematically. Finally, comparisons of the motifs, and the methodologies used for creating these mosaics are made with similar, and in some cases even identical works found in North Africa, especially around Carthage. From this, it can be determined that not only were the mosaics of Piazza Armerina influenced by North African design, but they may have even been made by North African mosaicists themselves.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Angela Petrillo; Valeria Catanese; Serena Micheletti;
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | CLIC (776758)

    Il flyer presenta le attività dell'Historic Urban Landscape Workshop svoltosi i a Salerno il 26-27 novembre 2018. Il prodotto, sviluppato includendo gli elementi fondamentali della Visual Identity del progetto e nel rispetto degli obblighi di dissemination e communication previsti dall'Annotated Model Grant Agreement, dettaglia le presentazioni di best practices di riuso adattivo del patrimonio culturale italiano presso la Fondazione EBRIS di Salerno.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sousa, Carlos A Mendes;
    Publisher: PANGAEA

    Data tables containing macroscopic facies description of subsurface data acquisition campaigns carried out in the Ria Formosa: 1) 41 manual holes with an Eijkelkamp Auger (code RFM); 2) 5 mechanical bores per roto-percussion with a 6t mobile drilling rig (code RF). The manual boreholes were photographed and described in situ, registering stratigraphy, colour, textural class, sedimentary structures, visible organic matter, and presence of bioclasts. The drilling depth oscillated between 1.55m and 8.6m. Mechanical boreholes were recovered and analysed in laboratory, described as the manual boreholes. Drilling depth oscillated between and between 11m and 26.5m. The boreholes were sampled, on average, every 0.6m (mechanical, in the laboratory) and 0.8m (manual, in the field). Selected samples were used for carbon-14 dating, and for textural and micropalaeontological analysis. Table is an export output of subsurface dataset created with Rockworks15. Borehole location is in decimal Lat. Long. WGS84 Datum. Data is published as part of the SIHER research project (PTDC/CTE-GIX112236/2009).

  • English
    Authors: 
    Office for National Statistics;
    Publisher: UK Data Service

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.BackgroundThe Labour Force Survey (LFS) is a unique source of information using international definitions of employment and unemployment and economic inactivity, together with a wide range of related topics such as occupation, training, hours of work and personal characteristics of household members aged 16 years and over. It is used to inform social, economic and employment policy. The LFS was first conducted biennially from 1973-1983. Between 1984 and 1991 the survey was carried out annually and consisted of a quarterly survey conducted throughout the year and a 'boost' survey in the spring quarter (data were then collected seasonally). From 1992 quarterly data were made available, with a quarterly sample size approximately equivalent to that of the previous annual data. The survey then became known as the Quarterly Labour Force Survey (QLFS). From December 1994, data gathering for Northern Ireland moved to a full quarterly cycle to match the rest of the country, so the QLFS then covered the whole of the UK (though some additional annual Northern Ireland LFS datasets are also held at the UK Data Archive). Further information on the background to the QLFS may be found in the documentation.Household datasetsUp to 2015, the LFS household datasets were produced twice a year (April-June and October-December) from the corresponding quarter's individual-level data. From January 2015 onwards, they are now produced each quarter alongside the main QLFS. The household datasets include all the usual variables found in the individual-level datasets, with the exception of those relating to income, and are intended to facilitate the analysis of the economic activity patterns of whole households. It is recommended that the existing individual-level LFS datasets continue to be used for any analysis at individual level, and that the LFS household datasets be used for analysis involving household or family-level data. From January 2011, a pseudonymised household identifier variable (HSERIALP) is also included in the main quarterly LFS dataset instead.Change to coding of missing values for household seriesFrom 1996-2013, all missing values in the household datasets were set to one '-10' category instead of the separate '-8' and '-9' categories. For that period, the ONS introduced a new imputation process for the LFS household datasets and it was necessary to code the missing values into one new combined category ('-10'), to avoid over-complication. This was also in line with the Annual Population Survey household series of the time. The change was applied to the back series during 2010 to ensure continuity for analytical purposes. From 2013 onwards, the -8 and -9 categories have been reinstated.LFS DocumentationThe documentation available from the Archive to accompany LFS datasets largely consists of the latest version of each volume alongside the appropriate questionnaire for the year concerned. However, LFS volumes are updated periodically by ONS, so users are advised to check the ONS LFS User Guidance page before commencing analysis.Additional data derived from the QLFSThe Archive also holds further QLFS series: End User Licence (EUL) quarterly datasets; Secure Access datasets (see below); two-quarter and five-quarter longitudinal datasets; quarterly, annual and ad hoc module datasets compiled for Eurostat; and some additional annual Northern Ireland datasets.End User Licence and Secure Access QLFS Household datasetsUsers should note that there are two discrete versions of the QLFS household datasets. One is available under the standard End User Licence (EUL) agreement, and the other is a Secure Access version. Secure Access household datasets for the QLFS are available from 2009 onwards, and include additional, detailed variables not included in the standard EUL versions. Extra variables that typically can be found in the Secure Access versions but not in the EUL versions relate to: geography; date of birth, including day; education and training; household and family characteristics; employment; unemployment and job hunting; accidents at work and work-related health problems; nationality, national identity and country of birth; occurrence of learning difficulty or disability; and benefits. For full details of variables included, see data dictionary documentation. The Secure Access version (see SN 7674) has more restrictive access conditions than those made available under the standard EUL. Prospective users will need to gain ONS Accredited Researcher status, complete an extra application form and demonstrate to the data owners exactly why they need access to the additional variables. Users are strongly advised to first obtain the standard EUL version of the data to see if they are sufficient for their research requirements.Changes to variables in QLFS Household EUL datasetsIn order to further protect respondent confidentiality, ONS have made some changes to variables available in the EUL datasets. From July-September 2015 onwards, 4-digit industry class is available for main job only, meaning that 3-digit industry group is the most detailed level available for second and last job.Review of imputation methods for LFS Household data - changes to missing valuesA review of the imputation methods used in LFS Household and Family analysis resulted in a change from the January-March 2015 quarter onwards. It was no longer considered appropriate to impute any personal characteristic variables (e.g. religion, ethnicity, country of birth, nationality, national identity, etc.) using the LFS donor imputation method. This method is primarily focused to ensure the 'economic status' of all individuals within a household is known, allowing analysis of the combined economic status of households. This means that from 2015 larger amounts of missing values ('-8'/-9') will be present in the data for these personal characteristic variables than before. Therefore if users need to carry out any time series analysis of households/families which also includes personal characteristic variables covering this time period, then it is advised to filter off 'ioutcome=3' cases from all periods to remove this inconsistent treatment of non-responders. Occupation data for 2021 and 2022 data filesThe ONS have identified an issue with the collection of some occupational data in 2021 and 2022 data files in a number of their surveys. While they estimate any impacts will be small overall, this will affect the accuracy of the breakdowns of some detailed (four-digit Standard Occupational Classification (SOC)) occupations, and data derived from them. None of ONS' headline statistics, other than those directly sourced from occupational data, are affected and you can continue to rely on their accuracy. For further information on this issue, please see: https://www.ons.gov.uk/news/statementsandletters/occupationaldatainonssurveys. Main Topics:The LFS household datasets cover:characteristics of the household: number of people of working age; number of people over working age; number of children aged 0 to 4; number of children aged 5 to 15; number of dependent children (i.e. those in full-time education) aged 16 to 18economic activity in the household: number of people in employment; number of people in full-time employment; number of people in part-time employment; unemployed; economically inactive; students; sick or disabled; economically inactive but would like to work and are not seeking work because they do not believe there is work available ('discouraged workers'); care of dependants Compilation/Synthesis

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Pilarczyk-Palaitis, Anna Ewa;
    Publisher: Toruń : Nicolaus Copernicus University
    Country: Lithuania

    The last century of Lithuanian history and the resulting dynamics of political and demographic change have radically transformed the role, meaning and forms of interpretation of Polish heritage in Lithuania. The purpose of the article is to observe the main directions of changes taking place within the cultural memory of Poles living in Lithuania – the largest national minority group in Lithuania. The report presents the processes of changing topicality of Polish heritage in Lithuania in three main areas of active cultural memory: history, art and religion. The first area is represented by objects related to Józef Piłsudski, the second one by the Pohulanka Theatre (now the Russian Drama Theatre) in Vilnius and objects related to Adam Mickiewicz, and the third one by objects related to the cult of Divine Mercy. The article analyses official communication of these memory objects (published by the objects’ owners or official managers) as well as memory practices and rituals carried out in these objects and described on social media and in news articles published in Lithuania in 2017–2019. Observing various types of storage media, in this case, some selected objects of cultural heritage and rituals and texts accompanying them, it is possible to notice processes of variability, exchange, erasing, redefining memory and hence the dynamics of changes in the Polish collective identity in modern Lithuania. The analysis of the formal ritualization and communication of these objects has enabled noticing several interesting trends, above all an occurrence of the phenomenon of polylogue of narratives and the process of universalization of Polish heritage in Lithuania and thus Lithuanian and Polish collective memory approaching each other. The following analysis is valuable as a starting point for reflection on the transformation of the ethnic identity of Poles in Lithuania. [...]

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rafter, Patrick A; Herguera, Juan-Carlos; Southon, John R;
    Publisher: PANGAEA

    For over a decade, oceanographers have debated the interpretation and reliability of sediment microfossil records indicating extremely low seawater radiocarbon (14C) during the last deglaciation-observations that suggest a major disruption in marine carbon cycling coincident with rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Possible flaws in these records include poor age model controls, utilization of mixed, infaunal foraminifera species possibly influenced by changing porewater chemistry, and bioturbation. We have addressed these concerns using a glacial-interglacial record of epifaunal benthic foraminifera 14C on an ideal sedimentary age model (wood calibrated to atmosphere 14C). Our results affirm – with important caveats – the fidelity of these microfossil archives and confirm previous observations of highly depleted seawater 14C at intermediate depths in the deglacial northeast Pacific

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Peng, Tianxin;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    This MA thesis traces how “ethnic Koreans” in northeastern China (chaoxianzu) reshaped their perception(s) of “ethnicity” over the course of the great political and social upheavals from Manchukuo to the People’s Republic of China. By looking into less-explored memoirs and oral histories, this research is interested in dissecting the interrelations between memory-formation and ethnic imagination. Chapter 1 lays the theoretical groundwork for my memory-centered approach, through which I historicize the ethnic Koreans’ conceptualization(s) of “ethnicity” as a process, rather than a self-evident precondition. Chapter 2 reveals the ethnic Koreans’ ambiguous and fluid sense of ethnicity under Manchukuo’s ideology of minzu xiehe (concordia of ethnos). Chapter 3 examines the cultural construction of “Korean ethnicity” advocated by the Chinese Communist Party during the Chinese civil war. Chapter 4 investigates the contestations between the Party-state’s revolutionary narrative and the bottom-up ethnic discourse in the early socialist era. This thesis argues that memory comes to be a mediator reifying the fluid, contingent, and sometimes-contested process of ethnic imagination in between the boundaries of nation-states.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    September, Aramis;
    Country: Finland

    The purpose of this thesis was to analyse representations of the horse in art history and examine ways in which representations of the horse could be used to posit new positive representations of power. The theoretical section explored the lineage of horse imagery in art history; this section also explored power imagery as well. The portrayal of the horse in Western art was analysed from the Renaissance onwards in order to have a firm historical understanding. From this base of understanding, the potential for new image creation was discussed. Paintings and statues were the primary focus of the thesis for its analysis. Possibilities for new and more positive images of power were explored through visuals featuring horses. The analysis suggested that because of the horse’s roots in art history as well as its powerful physical strength, status as a prey animal, and its gentle sensitivity, the horse was an image eminently suited for use in positing new and positive non-toxic images of power. Further, the analysis suggested that these new explorations stand in opposition to power images and power conceptualisations based in toxic masculinity and patriarchy. This contrast of new imagery and socially constructed expectations provided the starting point for critiquing current power imagery and moving beyond toxic imagery.