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  • Authors: (Ifpo), Institut Français du Proche-Orient;

    24x36 mm, gélatine plan-film.

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  • Authors: (ifpo), Institut Français Du Proche-Orient;

    24x36 mm, gélatine plan-film.

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  • Authors: (ifpo), Institut Français Du Proche-Orient;

    24x36 mm, film.

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  • Authors: (Ifpo), Institut Français du Proche-Orient;

    24x36mm, gélatine plan-film. Le lieu de prise de vue est incertain.

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  • Authors: (ifpo), Institut Français Du Proche-Orient;

    10x15 cm, gélatine plan-film

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  • Authors: (ifpo), Institut Français Du Proche-Orient;

    24x36 mm, gélatine plan-film.

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  • image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
    Authors: Picton Phillipps, Christina J.V.;

    Knowledge of the convict period in New South Wales has been substantially expanded and enriched through a number of revisionist scholarly studies in the last quarter of the twentieth century. The cumulative result has been the establishment of a number of new orthodoxies. These studies have drawn on a number of analytic frameworks including feminism and cliometrics, successfully challenging the previous historiography. The rich archival sources in New South Wales have been utilised to reformulate the convict period by a number of scholars, demonstrating the complexity of life in the penal colony. Academic divisions between what are regarded as "Australian" history and "British" history have imposed their own agendas on writing about transportation. This study challenges. this imposition through an examination of petitioners' approaches to the home and colonial administrations. A lacuna in the scholarly studies has been a lack of attention to transportation's consequences for married couples and their children. This study seeks to narrow that gap through these petitions. The findings of the study demonstrate the continuation of links between those who were transported and those who remained in Britain. It is argued that these findings have important implications for future research within Britain, and that what is disclosed by these petitions and the individuals who were involved in on-going communications cannot be restricted either to Australian or convict histories. Our knowledge of what transportation meant to individuals in the periphery as well as those in the metropole is diminished if the focus remains firmly on the settler community. Supplementary material from contemporary sources as well as the official records passing between the two administrations has been utilised and these supplementary sources suggest that there was a broad qivision between official publicly stated policy and practice in respect of transportees' family circumstances. Chapter One establishes the architecture of the thesis and explains the methodology adopted. Chapter Two offers a reinterpretation of the colony's formation in 1788 and inserts the "convict audience" of that day into the historiography. Chapter Three examines two petitioners writing from different gaols in Britain prior to their expected transportation. A resolution of the division between cliometrics and this more qualitative humanist approach is proposed. Chapter Four is a study of petitioners in Britain and a study of the process required for a reunion and reconstitution of family units in New South Wales. Chapter Five seeks to a resiting of male convicts as family members through an examination of a number of contemporary sources. Chapter Six examines the petitions raised by husbands and fathers for their wives and families to be given free passages to the colony. Chapter Seven provides case studies of three transportees and their experiences of the petitioning process. In Chapter Eight the focus broadens out from married men to examine and provide a revision of convicts' correspondence with their relatives and friends in Britain. Such correspondence has previously provided the basis for nationalist interpretations; the revision here suggests that such interpretations are anachronistic. Chapter Nine is an extended metaphor drawing the material together to the conclusions of the study.

    image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/ Edinburgh Research A...arrow_drop_down
    image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
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      image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/ Edinburgh Research A...arrow_drop_down
      image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
  • Authors: (Ifpo), Institut Français du Proche-Orient;

    24x36 mm, gélatine plan-film.

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  • Authors: BMRB International; National Centre for Volunteering;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The aims of this survey series are to ascertain : the proportion of the population who are involved in voluntary activity in the UK; the type of people most likely to volunteer; the types of activities in which volunteers are engaged; the motivations for volunteering; the benefits and drawbacks of voluntary work. The 1997 survey was carried out by BMRB International on behalf of the National Centre for Volunteering (formerly the Volunteer Centre). The need to compare trends in voluntary activity over time required that the survey was to a large extent a repeat of the previous surveys conducted by SCPR in 1981 and 1991, although some new topics were covered. A research project was carried out by the National Centre for Social Research in partnership with the Institute for Volunteering Research in 2006/7, as a follow-up to the Citizenship Survey, 2005. The resulting study, the National Survey of Volunteering and Charitable Giving, 2006-2007, is held at the UKDA under SN 5793. Main Topics: The survey covered the following subjects : working status; voluntary activity connected with work; marital status, disabilities and caring responsibilities; formal volunteering; organisation or group helped most, and most in past year (current and previous volunteers); barriers to volunteering and attitudes of irregular or former volunteers; informal volunteering; attitudes towards voluntary workers, and our society's attitudes towards them; receipt of voluntary help; donations. Users should note, a few variables on the questionnaire are not included in the dataset if they were used to create derived variables. There are many derived variables included (particularly in Section 4 of the questionnaire). Comparison of the topline and the questionnaire of the technical report is recommended for Section 4. Multi-stage stratified random sample CAPI was used. Face-to-face interview

    CESSDAarrow_drop_down
    CESSDA
    Other ORP type . 1999
    Data sources: B2FIND
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      CESSDAarrow_drop_down
      CESSDA
      Other ORP type . 1999
      Data sources: B2FIND
  • Authors: Navickas, Katrina;

    This article examines the women's protest camps at RAF Greenham Common cruise missile base, Berkshire, England, between 1981 and 1990. Using new evidence from government correspondence in the Home Office archives, it argues that the legal status of the common and its history were key determinants of how the protest camps were policed and repeatedly evicted. The processes of eviction were determined by the complex layers of landownership, common rights, and legislation relating to commons and roadside verges. Protesters developed spatial and legal tactics during the processes of eviction, while sharing broader imaginings of an ideal of commons as publicly accessible to all. This article places Greenham Common in the context of the Conservative government's reaction to other protest and social movements in the countryside that ultimately shaped the formation of public order legislation in 1986 and 1994. © 2023 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY), https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Peer reviewed

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Advanced search in Research products
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The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
  • Authors: (Ifpo), Institut Français du Proche-Orient;

    24x36 mm, gélatine plan-film.

    0
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  • Authors: (ifpo), Institut Français Du Proche-Orient;

    24x36 mm, gélatine plan-film.

    0
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  • Authors: (ifpo), Institut Français Du Proche-Orient;

    24x36 mm, film.

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    popularityAverage
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  • Authors: (Ifpo), Institut Français du Proche-Orient;

    24x36mm, gélatine plan-film. Le lieu de prise de vue est incertain.

    0
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  • Authors: (ifpo), Institut Français Du Proche-Orient;

    10x15 cm, gélatine plan-film

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  • Authors: (ifpo), Institut Français Du Proche-Orient;

    24x36 mm, gélatine plan-film.

    0
    citations0
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  • image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
    Authors: Picton Phillipps, Christina J.V.;

    Knowledge of the convict period in New South Wales has been substantially expanded and enriched through a number of revisionist scholarly studies in the last quarter of the twentieth century. The cumulative result has been the establishment of a number of new orthodoxies. These studies have drawn on a number of analytic frameworks including feminism and cliometrics, successfully challenging the previous historiography. The rich archival sources in New South Wales have been utilised to reformulate the convict period by a number of scholars, demonstrating the complexity of life in the penal colony. Academic divisions between what are regarded as "Australian" history and "British" history have imposed their own agendas on writing about transportation. This study challenges. this imposition through an examination of petitioners' approaches to the home and colonial administrations. A lacuna in the scholarly studies has been a lack of attention to transportation's consequences for married couples and their children. This study seeks to narrow that gap through these petitions. The findings of the study demonstrate the continuation of links between those who were transported and those who remained in Britain. It is argued that these findings have important implications for future research within Britain, and that what is disclosed by these petitions and the individuals who were involved in on-going communications cannot be restricted either to Australian or convict histories. Our knowledge of what transportation meant to individuals in the periphery as well as those in the metropole is diminished if the focus remains firmly on the settler community. Supplementary material from contemporary sources as well as the official records passing between the two administrations has been utilised and these supplementary sources suggest that there was a broad qivision between official publicly stated policy and practice in respect of transportees' family circumstances. Chapter One establishes the architecture of the thesis and explains the methodology adopted. Chapter Two offers a reinterpretation of the colony's formation in 1788 and inserts the "convict audience" of that day into the historiography. Chapter Three examines two petitioners writing from different gaols in Britain prior to their expected transportation. A resolution of the division between cliometrics and this more qualitative humanist approach is proposed. Chapter Four is a study of petitioners in Britain and a study of the process required for a reunion and reconstitution of family units in New South Wales. Chapter Five seeks to a resiting of male convicts as family members through an examination of a number of contemporary sources. Chapter Six examines the petitions raised by husbands and fathers for their wives and families to be given free passages to the colony. Chapter Seven provides case studies of three transportees and their experiences of the petitioning process. In Chapter Eight the focus broadens out from married men to examine and provide a revision of convicts' correspondence with their relatives and friends in Britain. Such correspondence has previously provided the basis for nationalist interpretations; the revision here suggests that such interpretations are anachronistic. Chapter Nine is an extended metaphor drawing the material together to the conclusions of the study.

    image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/ Edinburgh Research A...arrow_drop_down
    image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    visibility4
    visibilityviews4
    downloaddownloads1,860
    Powered by Usage counts
    more_vert
      image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/ Edinburgh Research A...arrow_drop_down
      image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
  • Authors: (Ifpo), Institut Français du Proche-Orient;

    24x36 mm, gélatine plan-film.

    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    more_vert
  • Authors: BMRB International; National Centre for Volunteering;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The aims of this survey series are to ascertain : the proportion of the population who are involved in voluntary activity in the UK; the type of people most likely to volunteer; the types of activities in which volunteers are engaged; the motivations for volunteering; the benefits and drawbacks of voluntary work. The 1997 survey was carried out by BMRB International on behalf of the National Centre for Volunteering (formerly the Volunteer Centre). The need to compare trends in voluntary activity over time required that the survey was to a large extent a repeat of the previous surveys conducted by SCPR in 1981 and 1991, although some new topics were covered. A research project was carried out by the National Centre for Social Research in partnership with the Institute for Volunteering Research in 2006/7, as a follow-up to the Citizenship Survey, 2005. The resulting study, the National Survey of Volunteering and Charitable Giving, 2006-2007, is held at the UKDA under SN 5793. Main Topics: The survey covered the following subjects : working status; voluntary activity connected with work; marital status, disabilities and caring responsibilities; formal volunteering; organisation or group helped most, and most in past year (current and previous volunteers); barriers to volunteering and attitudes of irregular or former volunteers; informal volunteering; attitudes towards voluntary workers, and our society's attitudes towards them; receipt of voluntary help; donations. Users should note, a few variables on the questionnaire are not included in the dataset if they were used to create derived variables. There are many derived variables included (particularly in Section 4 of the questionnaire). Comparison of the topline and the questionnaire of the technical report is recommended for Section 4. Multi-stage stratified random sample CAPI was used. Face-to-face interview

    CESSDAarrow_drop_down
    CESSDA
    Other ORP type . 1999
    Data sources: B2FIND
    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    more_vert
      CESSDAarrow_drop_down
      CESSDA
      Other ORP type . 1999
      Data sources: B2FIND
  • Authors: Navickas, Katrina;

    This article examines the women's protest camps at RAF Greenham Common cruise missile base, Berkshire, England, between 1981 and 1990. Using new evidence from government correspondence in the Home Office archives, it argues that the legal status of the common and its history were key determinants of how the protest camps were policed and repeatedly evicted. The processes of eviction were determined by the complex layers of landownership, common rights, and legislation relating to commons and roadside verges. Protesters developed spatial and legal tactics during the processes of eviction, while sharing broader imaginings of an ideal of commons as publicly accessible to all. This article places Greenham Common in the context of the Conservative government's reaction to other protest and social movements in the countryside that ultimately shaped the formation of public order legislation in 1986 and 1994. © 2023 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY), https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Peer reviewed

    0
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    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
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    more_vert