Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
11 Research products, page 1 of 2

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
  • Other research products
  • Danish
  • Roskilde Universitetscenter's Digitale Arkiv

10
arrow_drop_down
Relevance
arrow_drop_down
  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Jepsen, Louise Nygård;
    Country: Denmark

    This project aims to examine the historical source that mappa mundi is. The project is based on a literature study of primarily four carefully chosen writers. The writers are respectively historian of cartography David Woodward, Professor of Renaissance Jerry Brotton, Professor of History Evelyn Edson and Art Historian Naomi Reed Kline. The project is based on a variety of topics through which the use of the Hereford map as a historian source is highlighted and discussed. The premise of the study is a critical position in relation to the conclusions drawn by the chosen authors. The intention is to challenge the inferences made to reality. The conclusion of this report is that interpretations are based on the respective methods and their various viewpoints.

  • Other research product . 2016
    Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Petersen, Katherina; Thomsen, Anna; Lindhardtsen, Jesper; Frøkjær-Rubbås, Malthe;
    Country: Denmark

    The subject of this research project is to perform a comparative analysis of a section of the Danish media coverage in three different newspapers of the Israel/Palestine conflict, aiming to highlight an evolution or change, in the discourses used in these papers. The comparative analysis is based upon empirical material of eighteen newspaper editorials, discussing three chosen historical events, during the Israel/Palestine conflict. The historical events which the articles will represent, are the six-day war, the first intifada, and the second intifada. The reasoning behind the selection of these historical events is a necessity, for a broad perspective of the conflict, to make discursive changes more apparent. Additionally the chosen events are all substantial and well documented, and it is through these events that the change of discourse will be presented. To answer the research question thoroughly, a combination of the two distinctive theories relating the study of discourse will be used. The theories are Norman Fairclough’s ‘Critical discourse analysis’ and the ‘Discourse theory’ of Ernesto Laclau and Chantal Mouffe. Both offer an extensive look into the dynamic and complex structures of discourses, and will together provide a set of nuanced methods to complete the analysis. The overall scientific field in which these theories exist, is within the area of social constructivism which also relates to the theory of power by Michael Foucault. The analysis of the various discursive structures of the historical period in question, will focus on describing the more specific types of discourse of the different media outlets, separately and in unison, by shifting incorporations of the theories that have been presented. The precise method for this analytical procedure will be to locate and underline how certain phrases and specific usages of language are in a dynamic relationship with what they aim to represent, and how discourses in general seem to undergo striking, even insidious transformations through their use. Finally, the analysis of this paper attempts to answer the more difficult question, relating the causes behind these discursive transformations, and attributes them to the acknowledgement of discourses in general, as fundamentally transformative properties, where the use of language by its conception, is inevitably changing and dynamic in nature.

  • Other research product . 2014
    Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Gormsen, Maties Loehr; Larsen, Anna Sofie Lamm; Johansen, Jasmin Alexandra; Hilt, Marcus Christian; Jørgensen, Rasmus Buhl; Glenstrup, Frederik;
    Country: Denmark

    This paper investigates the study of Neuromarketing, it includes how methods within this study are developed and used, and if these can be used in an unethical way. To illustrate how neuromarketing got approved as a study, the history of neuroscience through a psychological perspective and the history of marketing will be presented. Furthermore the philosopher Immanuel Kants’ (1724-1804) thoughts of moral will be hold up against the methods of Neuromarketing. In continuation of this, the paper will include an experiment where subjects are presented for a Coca-Cola Christmas commercial. While they watch the commercial they are wearing a Neurosky Mindwave EEG-scanner. This is done to measure how much, and where they pay attention through the commercial, to determine that the effects of Neuromarketing works. The experiment is build around the hypothetico-deductive method. Lawsons design method from the book How designers think, are used during the design process. In this method; analysis, synthesis and evaluation are steps to reach the final design product, which in this case is a short movie to inform of the marketing strategy, Neuromarketing. Through the empirical data and the theories it is concluded that, it is possible to measure attention on the subjects during a commercial. Also the knowledge used in Neuromarketing possibly would not be ethical correct according to Immanuel Kants thoughts of moral.

  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Rasmussen, Emma; Hinnerskov, Joakim Hey; Sejsbo, Ask Harup; Kinch, Gustav Weber;
    Country: Denmark

    This paper revolves around the development of an LSTM multiclass classifier, constructed using Keras as framework and CRISP-DM as project process, with the purpose of classifying natural language into varying degrees of toxicity. The model takes a starting point in an existing toxic comment classification challenge from Kaggle.com, and makes a first iteration, engineered towards the requirements in the challenge. In this first iteration, several measures are taken to avoid common pitfalls of neural networks. The model is then held up against principles of freedom of speech including The Harm Principle and The Offence Principle by John Stuart Mill and Joel Feinberg respectively. After evaluating upon the models performance in the light of these principles, a second iteration is constructed with some design changes. For reasons i.a. related to the dataset, this operation is less successful. The paper concludes that it is possible to make a good multiclassification tool for shallow NLP problem, but gets less efficient in later iterations as we try to apply it to more concrete purposes.

  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Wiendel Rasmussen, Andreas; Meyer-Juhlin, Andreas; Ryttergaard, Emil;
    Country: Denmark

    In this project we have sought to explore how the National Museum's special exhibition Europe meets the World produces and disseminates the history of Europe and how the exhibition contributes to the discussion of a common European identity. As a basis for our theoretical understanding, we have availed ourselves of theories concerning identity and collective memory, narrative, the viewer's relationship to the exhibition and a conceptualization of the museum's presentation forms by virtue of museum theory and practice. We then compare the exhibition's various presentation forms and methods of the exhibition Kulturkontakte - Leben in Europe, which is a permanent exhibition at the Museum Europäischer Culture in Dahlem, Germany. Through these different perspectives about museums produce the form of European history; we can conclude that there exists a weighted relationship between the degree of the museum's narrative-related discourse and the viewer's interpretative framework. Through the National Museum's master narrative-related articulation is the space of negotiation that would have to be established between viewer and display impaired. In connection with the exhibition's contribution to the debate on a common European identity, it can be concluded that the identity is subject to the condition of a common understanding of the museum's historical production, which thus expresses itself in a collective memory. By virtue of the National Museum production, the contribution to the debate based on whether the chosen form rightly includes and relates to people living in modern and contemporary Europe.

  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Stechmann, Aksel; Stie-Svendsen, Jeppe;
    Country: Denmark

    This paper examines how Russian President Vladimir Putin incorporates the use of history in his speeches and articles with regards to how he positions Russia in its relation to Ukraine. The analysis is structured around three central places of remembrance (danish: erindringssteder): The Kyivan Rus which focuses on the close historical relation between Ukraine and Russia; the heritage of the Sovietunion in relation to how the union defined the borders of Soviet-Ukraine; World War II, ukrainian nationalism and its relation to nazism which centers around how Putin relates nazism to the current ukrainian political elite. The analysis concludes that Putin primarily utilizes the three places of remembrance to legitimize Russia's current invasion of Ukraine. Putin finds the distribution of territories during the soviet era to have been theft, and a complete violation of Russia's integrity. Furthermore, he seeks to protect ethnic russians within the borders of Ukraine from a genocide, instigated by ukrainian nationalists and neo-nazis, who continue the tradition of atrocities commited during World War II. Finally, Putin perceives Ukrainians and Russians as a single people, basing his claim on common history, language, and culture. Thus he implies that ukrainians should unite under Russia, as Russia is the more legitimate state.

  • Other research product . 2016
    Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Riis, Kasper Rydahl; Nielsen, Christian Lund; Deiborg, Mikkel;
    Country: Denmark

    This thesis examines how the university directive of 2003 changed the thoughts about and the processes on RUC. The theoretical framework is mainly Actor-Network Theory, which is used to help understand the network in which the actors are battling to give the object RUC meaning. The thesis does however also include Discourse Theory by Laclau and Mouffe to locate prevailing discourses about RUC. The thesis concludes that the university directive itself did not have a major influence on decision-making on RUC during the transition under rector Henrik Toft Jensen. However with the new rector Poul Holm in 2006 the possible fears of the directive was affirmed, as it enabled rector to make decisions based on intuition rather than democratic processes. The result was a step away from democracy and a leap towards business-like management. Poul Holm lasted a little more than two years, leaving an environment of distrust behind at the university, to be sorted his successors; Henning Salling-Olesen and Ib Poulsen who it seemed managed to find the middle ground between nurturing the university democracy and satisfying the political actors. Therefore the university law in itself did not harm RUC, however the consequence thereof started the biggest crisis at RUC in recent years.

  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Andersen, Mette Specht; Berthelsen, Jonas Juul; Philipsen, Emil; Præstegaard, Mads Christian;
    Country: Denmark

    This projects subject is the development of the secular rule through the secular clergy in the high middle ages with a focus on England. Our interest is what part the educated secular clergy played in the change from a vassal rule to a bureaucratic rule. To this we use the 4. Lateran Council canons to show the direct link to the Roman-Catholic Church, and how the Gregorian Reforms was a part of creating a professional clergy within the church. Combining this with The Dialogue Concerning the Exchequer as well as a wide variety of historians on the subject we wish to show what was the mind of the secular clergy and how he influenced the change in rule of man. On this we conclude the fol-lowing: The clergy was an significant part in the process which kept the secular power centralized and paved the way for the formation of the state.

  • Other research product . 2015
    Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Manniche, Rasmus Mathias; Madsen, Rasmus Helmgaard; Buhl, Frederik; Mortensen, Josefine Liv Rye Hovmand;
    Country: Denmark

    This study examines how learning games can be used to increase motivation in history classes, and convey historical knowledge about different time periods of Denmark, and their transitions, for 5th grade students. Based on game theories and empirical data gathered from interviews with a 5th grade class and an education supervisor of the Danish National Museum, a game concept for a learning game has been developed as a supplement to the traditional method of teaching history. The paper concludes through extensive interviews with the target group, that students lack motiva-tion because of their history book and the traditional way of teaching history. This study furthermore concludes that by implementing game elements, which the students know and find entertaining, it is possible to increase their motivation for history lessons.

  • Other research product . 2014
    Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Skov, Cecilie; Andersen, Simone Maja; Mortensen, Annagrethe Heuser; Haugaard, Oscar; Lindhardtsen, Jesper Krogh; Torndal, Stefanie; Hallas, Kenneth; Glemø, Nikolaj Hattens;
    Country: Denmark

    The project seeks to answer a number of questions, concerning the Danish Viking re-enactment community. The members of the Danish Viking re-enactment community seek to re-enact, interpret and experience the Viking age. The re-enactors use the insight they acquire through books, archaeological relics and their own reflections to create historical ‘accurate’ recreations of settlements, markets and battlefields. Each of these recreations depict vastly different aspects of the real Viking community, which is most notorious for its (in) famous raids. The raids abroad are among such subjects, which the re-enactors do not wish to re-enact. They do, however wish to re-enact essential parts of the everyday life as they imagine it could have been, including, artisanship, trading and combat. These three re-acted professions divide the re-enactment community respectively. The concept Authenticity, defined as both the historical accuracy and the individual experience of interconnection between the “constructed world” and the “real world”, plays a crucial role in re-enactment. In order to achieve both of these distinctive definitions, re-enactors go to great lengths to ensure their equipment and ‘roles’ are accounted for historically, in order to not only show historical accuracy, but to create the proper environment in which the re-enactors can experience moments of aforementioned interconnection between past and present. Members of Danish Viking re-enactment community form identities due to their involvement with the Viking age. A select few have converted to the old Scandinavian Asa-belief in order to narrow the gap between modern age and the Viking age. Through the re-enactors engagement with traditions and customs of the Viking age, three different layers of identity are affected; individual identities, collective identities in the groups and Danish national identity. History is in re-enactment interpreted, not as distant events disconnected from the present due to their distance in time, but as tangible narratives, connectable to the present through studies, involvement and reflectivity.