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114 Research products, page 1 of 12

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
  • Other research products
  • 2012-2021
  • Open Access
  • Other ORP type
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  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Leyssen, Mieke; Traub, Myriam; Ossenbruggen, Jacco; Hardman, Lynda;
    Publisher: CWI
    Country: Netherlands

    Cultural heritage institutes often make use of tags to facilitate searching their collections. While professionals associated with these institutes are able to add high quality descriptions to objects in the collections, both their time and their areas of expertise are limited. As a result, online tagging by non-professional users is more frequently becoming deployed to increase the number of tags. When these users are asked to tag objects in the collection, they can be confronted with tags submitted by other users. These tags may be of varying quality and present in differing numbers, both of which may influence users' tagging behavior. We report on a study on the impact of presenting different types of tags on the quality and quantity of tags added by users. We conclude that there is no difference in the quality and quantity of added tags in all experimental conditions, with the exception of the condition in which incorrect tags were presented. In this condition, the quality of the tags added by users decreased. We discuss the implications of these findings on the design of tagging interfaces.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2013
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ribbens, C.R.; de Boer, V.; van Doornik, J.; Buitinck, L.; Marx, M.; Veken, T.;
    Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
    Country: Netherlands
  • Open Access Dutch; Flemish
    Authors: 
    Ribbens, Kees;
    Country: Netherlands

    The book was original published in French: Putain de guerre! (2009)

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Stultiens, Andrea;
    Country: Netherlands

    Reflection on the process towards and around the publication 'Ebifananyi VII, Staying Alive - documenting the Uganda Cancer Institute' by medical historian Marissa Mika

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hagedoorn, Berber; van Gorp, Jasmijn; Keilbach, Judith; Müller, Eggo; Mustata, Dana; Badenoch, Alexander;
    Country: Netherlands
  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2019
    Open Access Dutch; Flemish
    Authors: 
    Tissen, L.N.M.;
    Country: Netherlands
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    van Driel, Mels F.;
    Country: Netherlands

    Introduction. Understanding the physiology of penile erection is important for all who work in the field of sexual medicine. Aim. The aim of this study was to highlight and analyze historical aspects of the scientific understanding of penile erection. Methods. (i) Review of the chapters on the physiology of erection out of the author's collection of books dealing with male sexual functioning published in the German, French, Dutch, and English language in between 1780 and 1940. (ii) Review of the topic "physiology of penile erection" of relevant chapters of Classical writings on erectile dysfunction. An annotated collection of original texts from three millennia, including the study of all relevant references mentioned in these books. Main Outcome Measure. The main outcome measure used for the study was the scientific understanding of the physiology of penile erection. Results. In Antiquity, Galen considered penile erection as the result the accumulation of air. His ideas so dominated medieval medicine that nearly everyone then alive was a Galenist. The beginning of the Renaissance shows meaningful examples of experimental scientific work on the penis. Da Vinci correctly concluded that erections were caused by blood, and in the 18th century, Von Haller from Switzerland was the first who explained that erections were under the control of the nervous system. In the 19th century, a mindset that emphasized on experimentation determined a new direction, namely experimental physiology. Animal studies clarified that stimulation of the nervi erigentes-induced small muscle relaxation in the corpora cavernosa. Nearly all were published in the German language. That may be one of the reasons that the existence of the concept of smooth muscle relaxation remained controversial until the first World Congress on Impotence in 1984 in Paris. Conclusions. As the Renaissance's innovative research defined neural and vascular physiologic phenomena responsible for penile erection. The concepts from animal experimentations in Europe in the 19th century significantly contributed to the current understanding of penile erection.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Harmsen, Wouter; de Groot, Janke; Harkema, Albert; van Dusseldorp, Ingeborg; De Bruin, Jonathan; Van den Brand, Sofie; Van de Schoot, Rens; Leerstoel Schoot; Research & Data Management Services; Methodology and statistics for the behavioural and social sciences;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Netherlands

    In a time of exponential growth of new evidence supporting clinical decision making, combined with a labor-intensive process of selecting this evidence, there is a need for methods to speed up current processes in order to keep medical guidelines up-to-date. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance and feasibility of active learning to support the selection of relevant publications within the context of medical guideline development.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Chatterjee, Avishek; Nardi, Cosimo; Oberije, Cary; Lambin, Philippe;
    Country: Netherlands

    Background: Searching through the COVID-19 research literature to gain actionable clinical insight is a formidable task, even for experts. The usefulness of this corpus in terms of improving patient care is tied to the ability to see the big picture that emerges when the studies are seen in conjunction rather than in isolation. When the answer to a search query requires linking together multiple pieces of information across documents, simple keyword searches are insufficient. To answer such complex information needs, an innovative artificial intelligence (AI) technology named a knowledge graph (KG) could prove to be effective. Methods: We conducted an exploratory literature review of KG applications in the context of COVID-19. The search term used was "covid-19 knowledge graph". In addition to PubMed, the first five pages of search results for Google Scholar and Google were considered for inclusion. Google Scholar was used to include non-peer-reviewed or non-indexed articles such as pre-prints and conference proceedings. Google was used to identify companies or consortiums active in this domain that have not published any literature, peer-reviewed or otherwise. Results: Our search yielded 34 results on PubMed and 50 results each on Google and Google Scholar. We found KGs being used for facilitating literature search, drug repurposing, clinical trial mapping, and risk factor analysis. Conclusions: Our synopses of these works make a compelling case for the utility of this nascent field of research.

  • Other research product . InteractiveResource . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Philip Verhagen; Bjørn P. Bartholdy;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Netherlands

    This is part 2 of the Rchon statistics course. The purpose of this tutorial is to extend the application of R from basic data analysis and visualisation to formal statistical testing. In this tutorial, we will treat the following statistical testing methods: t-test ANOVA Further testing methods (including chi square test, Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis test) will be treated in part 3 and 4 of this course. Follow the instructions in Instructions Tutorial 2.pdf to start the tutorial. This course was originally created for Archon Research School of Archaeology by Philip Verhagen (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam) and Bjørn P. Bartholdy (University of Leiden), and consists of an instruction, a tutorial, a test and four datafiles. All content is CC BY-NC-SA: it can be freely distributed and modified under the condition of proper attribution and non-commercial use. How to cite: Verhagen, P. & B.P. Bartholdy, 2021. Rchon statistics course, part 2. Amsterdam, ARCHON Research School of Archaeology. doi: 10.5281/zenodo.5155471

Advanced search in Research products
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The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
114 Research products, page 1 of 12
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Leyssen, Mieke; Traub, Myriam; Ossenbruggen, Jacco; Hardman, Lynda;
    Publisher: CWI
    Country: Netherlands

    Cultural heritage institutes often make use of tags to facilitate searching their collections. While professionals associated with these institutes are able to add high quality descriptions to objects in the collections, both their time and their areas of expertise are limited. As a result, online tagging by non-professional users is more frequently becoming deployed to increase the number of tags. When these users are asked to tag objects in the collection, they can be confronted with tags submitted by other users. These tags may be of varying quality and present in differing numbers, both of which may influence users' tagging behavior. We report on a study on the impact of presenting different types of tags on the quality and quantity of tags added by users. We conclude that there is no difference in the quality and quantity of added tags in all experimental conditions, with the exception of the condition in which incorrect tags were presented. In this condition, the quality of the tags added by users decreased. We discuss the implications of these findings on the design of tagging interfaces.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2013
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ribbens, C.R.; de Boer, V.; van Doornik, J.; Buitinck, L.; Marx, M.; Veken, T.;
    Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
    Country: Netherlands
  • Open Access Dutch; Flemish
    Authors: 
    Ribbens, Kees;
    Country: Netherlands

    The book was original published in French: Putain de guerre! (2009)

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Stultiens, Andrea;
    Country: Netherlands

    Reflection on the process towards and around the publication 'Ebifananyi VII, Staying Alive - documenting the Uganda Cancer Institute' by medical historian Marissa Mika

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hagedoorn, Berber; van Gorp, Jasmijn; Keilbach, Judith; Müller, Eggo; Mustata, Dana; Badenoch, Alexander;
    Country: Netherlands
  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2019
    Open Access Dutch; Flemish
    Authors: 
    Tissen, L.N.M.;
    Country: Netherlands
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    van Driel, Mels F.;
    Country: Netherlands

    Introduction. Understanding the physiology of penile erection is important for all who work in the field of sexual medicine. Aim. The aim of this study was to highlight and analyze historical aspects of the scientific understanding of penile erection. Methods. (i) Review of the chapters on the physiology of erection out of the author's collection of books dealing with male sexual functioning published in the German, French, Dutch, and English language in between 1780 and 1940. (ii) Review of the topic "physiology of penile erection" of relevant chapters of Classical writings on erectile dysfunction. An annotated collection of original texts from three millennia, including the study of all relevant references mentioned in these books. Main Outcome Measure. The main outcome measure used for the study was the scientific understanding of the physiology of penile erection. Results. In Antiquity, Galen considered penile erection as the result the accumulation of air. His ideas so dominated medieval medicine that nearly everyone then alive was a Galenist. The beginning of the Renaissance shows meaningful examples of experimental scientific work on the penis. Da Vinci correctly concluded that erections were caused by blood, and in the 18th century, Von Haller from Switzerland was the first who explained that erections were under the control of the nervous system. In the 19th century, a mindset that emphasized on experimentation determined a new direction, namely experimental physiology. Animal studies clarified that stimulation of the nervi erigentes-induced small muscle relaxation in the corpora cavernosa. Nearly all were published in the German language. That may be one of the reasons that the existence of the concept of smooth muscle relaxation remained controversial until the first World Congress on Impotence in 1984 in Paris. Conclusions. As the Renaissance's innovative research defined neural and vascular physiologic phenomena responsible for penile erection. The concepts from animal experimentations in Europe in the 19th century significantly contributed to the current understanding of penile erection.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Harmsen, Wouter; de Groot, Janke; Harkema, Albert; van Dusseldorp, Ingeborg; De Bruin, Jonathan; Van den Brand, Sofie; Van de Schoot, Rens; Leerstoel Schoot; Research & Data Management Services; Methodology and statistics for the behavioural and social sciences;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Netherlands

    In a time of exponential growth of new evidence supporting clinical decision making, combined with a labor-intensive process of selecting this evidence, there is a need for methods to speed up current processes in order to keep medical guidelines up-to-date. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance and feasibility of active learning to support the selection of relevant publications within the context of medical guideline development.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Chatterjee, Avishek; Nardi, Cosimo; Oberije, Cary; Lambin, Philippe;
    Country: Netherlands

    Background: Searching through the COVID-19 research literature to gain actionable clinical insight is a formidable task, even for experts. The usefulness of this corpus in terms of improving patient care is tied to the ability to see the big picture that emerges when the studies are seen in conjunction rather than in isolation. When the answer to a search query requires linking together multiple pieces of information across documents, simple keyword searches are insufficient. To answer such complex information needs, an innovative artificial intelligence (AI) technology named a knowledge graph (KG) could prove to be effective. Methods: We conducted an exploratory literature review of KG applications in the context of COVID-19. The search term used was "covid-19 knowledge graph". In addition to PubMed, the first five pages of search results for Google Scholar and Google were considered for inclusion. Google Scholar was used to include non-peer-reviewed or non-indexed articles such as pre-prints and conference proceedings. Google was used to identify companies or consortiums active in this domain that have not published any literature, peer-reviewed or otherwise. Results: Our search yielded 34 results on PubMed and 50 results each on Google and Google Scholar. We found KGs being used for facilitating literature search, drug repurposing, clinical trial mapping, and risk factor analysis. Conclusions: Our synopses of these works make a compelling case for the utility of this nascent field of research.

  • Other research product . InteractiveResource . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Philip Verhagen; Bjørn P. Bartholdy;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Netherlands

    This is part 2 of the Rchon statistics course. The purpose of this tutorial is to extend the application of R from basic data analysis and visualisation to formal statistical testing. In this tutorial, we will treat the following statistical testing methods: t-test ANOVA Further testing methods (including chi square test, Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis test) will be treated in part 3 and 4 of this course. Follow the instructions in Instructions Tutorial 2.pdf to start the tutorial. This course was originally created for Archon Research School of Archaeology by Philip Verhagen (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam) and Bjørn P. Bartholdy (University of Leiden), and consists of an instruction, a tutorial, a test and four datafiles. All content is CC BY-NC-SA: it can be freely distributed and modified under the condition of proper attribution and non-commercial use. How to cite: Verhagen, P. & B.P. Bartholdy, 2021. Rchon statistics course, part 2. Amsterdam, ARCHON Research School of Archaeology. doi: 10.5281/zenodo.5155471